Archives and Special Collections
92 Snell Library
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Boston, MA 02115
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Archives and Special Collections Finding Aids

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Collection Overview
Title:The Oral History Center records
Date:1978-1998
Location Code:64/2-3; 71/3; 55/1; FF1/D10
Reference Code:M73
Extent:17.15 cubic ft. (24 boxes)
Scope and Content Abstract:The records of the Oral History Center document their efforts between 1978 and 1998 to collect the stories of groups often overlooked by history, including women, children, immigrants, and minorities, in the Cambridge and Boston area. Records include correspondence, reports, plans and proposals, project files, funding information, lesson plans, publicity materials, oral history audio recordings and transcriptions, video recordings, photographs, and slides. Series 1 documents the administrative operations of the Oral History Center. Series 2 contains information concerning the Oral History Center's move to Northeastern University and the relationship between the two organizations. Series 3 contains information about projects in which the Oral History Center acted as either a consultant or in collaboration with another organization. Series 4 deals with workshops that the Oral History Center sponsored, took part in, or attended. Series 5 covers the oral history projects of the Oral History Center and includes transcripts, photographs, slides, and planning documentation. Series 6 contains audio-visual documentation of the Oral History Center's projects, including the oral history interviews for the projects documented in Series 5.
Historical Abstract:In 1978, Cindy Cohen began "From Hearing My Mother Talk," an oral history project involving interviews with 11 women in Cambridge, Massachusetts on the theme of transitions in women's lives. Cohen received funding from the Cambridge Arts Council, which published her work in 1979. This oral history project inspired Cohen to initiate the "Cambridge Women's Oral History Project" in 1980. Its success led to multiple related projects, including "Let Life Be Yours," "Transitions in Women's Lives," and the "Cambridge Women's Quilt Project." In 1981, an advisory committee was created to form the Cambridge Social Resource Center, and in 1983, the Cambridge Oral History Center was incorporated in Massachusetts. The Center's mission was to "collect, preserve, and make accessible material related to the social history of Cambridge groups that have not usually had their experiences documented." In 1987, the Center's name changed to The Oral History Center, citing visible work outside of Cambridge. Other projects involved folk arts of Palestinian and Jewish women in Boston as well as violence among youth in Roxbury, Boston, Massachusetts. In 1994, the Center shifted focus and began to train educators and cultural organizational leaders in collecting oral histories. In 1995, the Center became affiliated with Northeastern University and moved onto its campus. In 1998, the Oral History Center ceased operations.
Language and Scripts:Materials predominantly in English with some interviews and presentations in Spanish, Portuguese, and Hatian Creole.
System of Arrangement:Organized into 6 series: 1. Administrative; 2. Northeastern University; 3. Consultancies; 4. Workshops; 5. Projects and 6. Audiovisual.
Subjects and Contributors:
  • Cohen, Cynthia
  • Metz, Kristen
  • McKenna, Jennifer
  • Pratt, Carrie
  • Thompson, William

  • Cambridge (Mass.) Oral History Center
  • Oral History Center (Boston, Mass.)
  • Northeastern University (Boston, Mass.). Center for Innovation in Urban Education

  • African Americans -- Massachusetts -- Boston
  • African Americans -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge
  • African American women -- Massachusetts -- Boston
  • African American women -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge
  • Aged women -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge
  • Azoreans -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge
  • Cambridge (Mass.) -- History
  • Folk art -- Massachusetts
  • Folklore -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge
  • Haitians -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge
  • Hispanic American women -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge
  • History -- Study and teaching (Elementary) -- Massachusetts
  • Jewish women -- Massachusetts -- Boston
  • Oral history
  • Oral history -- Methodology
  • Quilt makers -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge
  • Palestinian women -- Massachusetts -- Boston
  • Roxbury (Boston, Mass.) -- History
  • Storytelling -- Massachusetts
  • Women -- Massachusetts -- Boston
  • Women -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge
  • Youth and violence -- Massachusetts -- Boston

Conditions Governing Access:The collection is unrestricted.
Technical Access:Archives staff must make research copies of audio and audio-visual materials prior to use.
Immediate Source of Acquisition:The Oral History Center records are made up of two donations made 22 July 1999 by William Thompson on behalf of the Board of Trustees of the Oral History Center for Community Education and Action and 17 August 2006 by Kimberley Sansoucy of the Cambridge Women's Commission.
Conditions Governing Reproduction and Use:Copyright restrictions may apply.
Processor:Finding aid prepared by Stein Helmrich, September 2002. Updated by Anna J. Cook, August 2010.

Scope and Content Note

The records of the Oral History Center document the efforts between 1978 and 1998 to collect the stories of groups often overlooked by history, including women, children, immigrants, and minorities, in the Cambridge and Boston area. Records include correspondence, reports, plans and proposals, project files, funding information, lesson plans, publicity materials, oral history audio recordings and transcriptions, video recordings, photographs, and slides.

The collection is organized into six series. The first series documents the administrative operations of the Oral History Center. The second series contains information concerning the move to Northeastern University and the relationship between the two organizations. The third series contains information about projects in which the Oral History Center acted as either a consultant or in collaboration with another organization. The fourth series deals with workshops that the Oral History Center sponsored, took part in, or attended. The fifth and largest series covers the oral history projects of the Oral History Center and includes transcripts, photographs, slides, and planning documentation. The sixth series contains audio-visual documentation of the Oral History Center's projects, including the oral history interviews for the projects documented in Series 5. The collection also contains oversized artwork, such as posters, quilts, and pieces of displays associated with the projects.

Historical Note

In 1976, while working in a battered women's shelter in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, Cindy Cohen realized the powerful affect that a person's stories could have on other people. Two years later Cohen began From Hearing My Mother Talk, a project about women's folk tales. Working with teenage girls, Cohen interviewed 11 women in Cambridge, Massachusetts on the theme of transitions in women's lives. Cohen received funding from the Cambridge Arts Council, which published her work in 1979. This oral history project inspired Cohen to initiate the Cambridge Women's Oral History Project in the fall of 1980, with funding from the Cambridge Arts Council.

The Cambridge Women's Oral History Project involved training Cambridge high-school-aged girls to interview older generations of Cambridge women, so that they could gain a better understanding of women's history. The success of the group spawned multiple related projects, for which Cambridge Women's Oral History Project acted as an umbrella. Projects included Let Life Be Yours, Transitions In Women's Lives, and the Cambridge Women's Quilt Project. This project brought younger and older women together to sew quilt patches documenting their stories. The projects Common Threads, A Patchwork of Our Lives, and Stories In Fabric followed upon the success of the Cambridge Women's Quilt Project.

With the scope of the Cambridge Women's Oral History Project growing, Cohen's work became more than an individual project. Beginning in 1981, an advisory committee was created to take steps to form the Cambridge Social Resource Center.

During 1982, the group accepted applications for the founding members of the Center. On March 4, 1983, the Cambridge Oral History Center was incorporated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. On 13 June1984, the center received non-profit status from the federal government. The Cambridge Oral History Center's initial stated purpose was to "collect, preserve, and make accessible material related to the social history of Cambridge groups that have not usually had their experiences documented.

Lifelines was the first major project of the Cambridge Oral History Center. Unlike the previous projects, it was not related to Cohen's work with Cambridge women. Instead, "Lifelines" was a collaboration with the Cambridge Public Schools. The center trained teachers in the methods for collecting oral histories, and then helped teachers to implement oral history projects with their students.

By 1986, the Cambridge Oral History Center's growth necessitated organizational change. The Board of Directors was strengthened, a new committee structure was put in place, a new organizational statement of purpose was written, and the director was paid on a full-time basis. In 1987, the corporation's name was officially changed to The Oral History Center, citing the Cambridge Oral History Center's visible work outside of Cambridge.

Highlighting the Oral History Center's rapid and influential growth, the Massachusetts Council on the Arts and Humanities honored them in 1987. It named the Oral History Center to a list of 34 organizations designated as "leaders in enriching cultural life of the Commonwealth.

In 1988, the center began another major project, A Passion For Life, focusing on the folk arts of Palestinian and Jewish women currently living in Boston. Concurrent projects included The King Connection and People Are Stories, along with the ongoing Lifelines project.

In November 1988, the Oral History Center move to 186 Hampshire St. from 57 Inman St. in Cambridge. Coincidentally, the Oral History Center suffered financial difficulties. Numerous federal and state budget cuts, due to the recession, limited the availability of funding for cultural and arts programs. In addition to financial difficulties, it underwent structural changes. By 1989, Cohen's title as founder/director was changed to co-director with Kristen Metz, while Jennifer McKenna became the executive director. Between January and June of 1990, Cohen further reduced her role to consultant for the Oral History Center, directing only the A Passion For Life project. McKenna left in June 1990, and Kristen Metz became executive director for the next three years.

Metz immediately oversaw two important projects of the Oral History Center, a collaboration with Head Start in Jamaica Plain and another with Youth Build Boston. From the Youth Build Boston project emerged the fourth major project, Griots of Roxbury, in 1991. Griots used oral histories to explain the problem of youth violence. Griots was also the Oral History Center's first major project to be focused entirely outside of Cambridge.

On 19 June 1992, the Oral History Center celebrated its tenth anniversary. Less than a year later, it moved to 25 West St. in the Downtown Crossing section of Boston. Metz stepped down in September 1993; the Oral History Center's education director, Carrie Pratt, and a board member, William Thompson, became the acting directors.

With the birth of the Learning From Our Lives project in 1994, the Oral History Center experienced a major shift in focus. This program was an extended series of workshops designed to train educators and cultural organizational leaders in the model of collecting oral histories. At this time, the center decided that "its mission of building and strengthening communities through telling of life stories" could be better fulfilled through training others to collect oral histories, rather than by conducting oral histories.

At the same time, the Oral History Center sought an affiliation with a more recognizable educational institution. In 1994, it became affiliated with the Center for Innovation in Urban Education at Northeastern University. The institute's mission of providing new and creative ways to educate urban youths was a perfect compliment for the Oral History Center. On June 26, 1995, the Oral History Center moved onto Northeastern University's campus.

After 1998, the Oral History Center ceased its operations due to lack of funds.

Cambridge Women's Oral History Project: ca. 1978-1985

Although it began as an individual project, the Cambridge Women's Oral History Project eventually became the umbrella for nine interconnected projects between approximately 1978 and 1985. The projects continued to be exhibited after 1985.

From Hearing My Mother Talk: Stories of Cambridge Women, 1978-1980

From Hearing My Mother Talk was Cindy Cohen's original oral history project, sponsored by the Cambridge Arts Council. Cohen interviewed 11 elderly women in Cambridge and then compiled their stories into a book. Published in 1979, the book featured a woodcutting on the cover by Bonnie Acker. The image of three women later became the logo of the Cambridge Women's Oral History Project and the Oral History Center.

Cambridge Women's Oral History Project: Sep. 1980-Aug. 1981

Cohen's second project funded through the Cambridge Arts Council, the Cambridge Women's Oral History Project was a more ambitious version of From Hearing My Mother Talk. In the Cambridge Women's Oral History Project Cohen taught and oversaw 30 Cambridge high-school-aged girls interviewing older Cambridge women. The purpose of the project was to allow the girls to "explore the theme of transitions in women's lives by interviewing older women." The girls compiled 50 hours of taped interviews in English, Spanish, Haitian Creole, and Portuguese, representing four minority communities in Cambridge: African-American, Latino, Haitian, and Azorean.

Let Life Be Yours: Voices of Cambridge Working Women, 1981

Let Life Be Yours was a thirty minute slide-tape show of the Cambridge Women's Oral History Project. The show was based on the interviews of 26 Cambridge women and was available in English, Spanish, Haitian-Creole, and Portuguese. The show was co- produced by Cohen and directed by Cindy Marshall. First shown in the King School cafeteria in July 1981, the show was eventually shown in over 500 community and educational settings, including as far away as Belize. These showings were often used as the basis for community discussions and forums.

Transitions in Women's Lives: Community Education Program, 1981-1982

Transitions in Women's Lives was the educational program coinciding with Let Life Be Yours. Initially it translated the Cambridge Women's Oral History Project for a slide-tape show into Spanish, Haitian Creole, and Portuguese. It then conducted community forums in connection with the viewings of Let Life Be Yours. Another part of Transitions in Women's Lives was the "Azorean Letters," a set of six fictional letters in Portuguese and English that explored change and choice in the lives of Azorean women in Cambridge. Also part of Transitions in Women's Lives was a poem written in Spanish and English by Marjorie Agosin, entitled "Deja que La Vida Sea Tuya," or "Let Life Be Yours."

The Way Things Were: Jest Us, 1982-1983

The Way Things Were represented the African American portion of Let Life Be Yours. It began as a part of Transitions in Women's Lives but soon became a separate project. The Way Things Were was a collaboration with Jest Us, a club for African American teens in Central Square Cambridge. Members of Jest Us interviewed four African American women for their project. The stories were compiled into a book, and an exhibit was created in 1982 for the Patchwork of Our Lives Exhibit, described below.

Cambridge Women's Quilt Project: 1982

Following the Cambridge Women's Oral History Project, the Cambridge Women's Quilt Project involved 60 Cambridge women from ages eight to 80. The project included interviews with the older women and the creation of quilt patches documenting their stories. In all, 52 blocks were created for the quilt. The quilt became the signature of the Cambridge Women's Oral History Project. It was shown at the International Women's Conference in Nairobi, Kenya in 1985 and was the inspiration for multiple projects, including ones in Belize, Central America, and Soweto, South Africa. From 1989 to 1990, the quilt toured the United States as the paradigm of contemporary urban folklore for the Museum of Our National Heritage's exhibit, "New Roots, New Folks." As with the Cambridge Women's Oral History Project, the Cambridge Women's Quilt Project was directly continued through other projects.

Common Threads: 1982-1985

A continuation of the Cambridge Women's Quilt Project, Common Threads was "created to highlight the skills and the stories of traditional fabric artists in diverse cultural communities." Its original goal was to document the quilt and identify traditional fabric artists. However, only the quilt catalogue and postcards were completed. These were presented in fall 1982 as part of the Patchwork of Our Lives exhibit. In November 1983, an exhibit including a slide-tape show, the quilt catalogue and postcards, and documentation of traditional fabric artists was shown at the Field Branch of the Cambridge Public Library.

A Patchwork of Our Lives: Women's Stories in Words and Fabric, 1982

The Patchwork of Our Lives project unfolded in three parts. First, Betsy Rose led a group of youths, who had participated in the Cambridge Women's Quilt Project, in creating a song about making the women's quilt and its stories, entitled "A Patchwork of Our Lives." In addition, the first section of the Common Threads project in fall 1982 was called A Patchwork of Our Lives. Lastly, the exhibit in which both the Cambridge Women's Quilt Project song and "Common Threads" catalogue were presented was entitled "A Patchwork of Our Lives." This exhibit was held from September 20, 1982 until October 31, 1982 at Gallery 57 in the Cambridge City Hall Annex. The exhibit presented the "tangible results of the Cambridge Women's Oral History Project and the Cambridge Women's Quilt Project." This included performances of the song "A Patchwork of Our Lives," the Cambridge Women's Quilt, excerpts from the Cambridge Women's Oral History Project, showings of Let Life Be Yours, translations from The Way Things Were, community forums, and an exhibition of the Azorean letters from The Way Things Were.

Stories in Fabric: 1984-1985

This project was a follow up to the Cambridge Women's Quilt Project, inspired by a visit from two Chilean women. The project was done in the Chilean style of "arpillera," small quilted tapestries. The two Chilean women had produced their own arpilleras documenting their struggles under the Chilean dictatorship. Project coordinator Lyndsay French interviewed Cambridge women and young girls for the project. French then helped them to make individual tapestries depicting their stories. An exhibit containing the tapestries, excerpts of the interviews, and photographs of the participants was first shown along with the Common Threads project at the Field Branch of the Cambridge Public Library in 1983. In 1985, it was brought with the Cambridge women's quilt to the International Women's Conference in Nairobi, Kenya.

Lifelines: ca. 1985-1991

Lifelines was the first major project undertaken by the Cambridge Oral History Center not directly related to the Cambridge Women's Oral History Project. The project was a collaboration with the Cambridge Public Schools that "involved the students and teachers in the magic of telling, eliciting, and shaping stories." The Cambridge Oral History Center trained teachers in Cambridge to collect oral histories. The student projects of Lifelines were "focused on the life experiences of people most often excluded from traditional texts; such as women, working people, ethnic 'minorities,' immigrants and older people." In addition to the student projects, Lifelines produced two main works. The first was the book The Mango Tree: Stories Told by Children in the Cambridge Public Schools, an anthology of student writings and oral histories collected during the first two years of the project. The project also generated a curriculum packet that became the Oral History Center's model for using oral history in the classroom. During the course of the Lifelines project, four curriculum packets were produced.

A Passion For Life: Stories and Folk Arts of Palestinian and Jewish Women, Jul. 1988-May 1990

A Passion For Life consisted of oral history interviews of eight Jewish and Palestinian women living in Boston, whose lives involved some type of folk art tradition. The purpose of Passion For Life was to help the women, from cultures of long-standing conflict, find a common bond without hiding the fact that they had important differences. A Passion For Life was exhibited extensively to the public, and a quilt was attempted but never finished.

Griots of Roxbury: ca. 1991-1996

In 1990, the Oral History Center collaborated with Youth Build Boston. This inspired the Griots project. Originally titled the Roxbury Oral History Project, a staff member renamed the project during the planning stages. "A 'griot' was the oral historian and educator in any given African society; the griot's role was to teach people to know themselves." Griots took a unique approach to the issue of violence among youth in order to form a better understanding of the issues and to create strategies to solve them. Hazel Bright, director of the project, met on a regular basis with 25 Roxbury youths, ages 17 to 20, to discuss the violence they faced and to teach them to conduct oral history interviews. In turn, they interviewed five generations of Roxbury residents about their youth in Roxbury and how violence played a role in it. The exhibit "You Got A Story To Tell" was based on the Griots interviews with youths, ages 14 to 24, and shown in January 1994. The Griots project was also displayed in the Dillaway-Thomas House in Roxbury.

Chronology
1979Cindy Cohen publishes "From Hearing My Mother Talk"
1980Cohen begins the Cambridge Women's Oral History Project.
1981An advisory group is established to create the Cambridge Social Resource Center.
1982The Cambridge Women's Quilt Project is initiated.
1983On March 4, the Cambridge Oral History Center is incorporated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.
1984On June 13, the Cambridge Oral History Center receives non-profit tax exempt status from the federal government.
1985The Lifelines project begins.
1986During organizational restructuring, the center is renamed the Oral History Center.
1987Recognized by the Massachusetts Cultural Council as a leader in cultural life in the state.
1988The A Passion for Life project is initiated; The Oral History Center moves from its home of 57 Inman St. to 186 Hampshire St., both in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
1990Founder/Director Cindy Cohen leaves the Oral History Center.
1991The Griots of Roxbury project is started.
1992On June 19, the Oral History Center celebrates its tenth anniversary.
1993In March, the Oral History Center moves to a new location at 25 West St., Boston; Executive director Kristen Metz leaves in September.
1994The Oral History Center changes its focus from the implementation of oral history projects to training others in collection oral histories.
1995On June 26, the Oral History Center moves on to the campus of Northeastern University.
1998Operations suspended.
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Series:

1. Administrative, 1981-1997
Volume:2 cubic ft.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical
Summary:

The first series documents the administration of the Oral History Center. Included are records documenting the Board of Directors, finances, planning, fund raising, promotions, committees, and personnel. Folders on individuals consist of their notes, correspondence, and other work while associated with the Oral History Center. There is also information dealing with the background, its evolving mission, and plans for the future. There are also photographs and slides, mostly dealing with the annual Oral History Festival held by the Oral History Center.
BoxTitleDate
Board of Directors
1Board Developmentn.d., 1985-1993
1Correspondence1993-1997
1Individual Informationn.d., 1990-1993
1Meetings1984-1987
1Member Lists1987-1998
1Notesn.d., 1990-1996
1Plan for the Oral History Center1991
1Responsibilitiesn.d., 1988
1Board/Staff Retreat (2 folders)1989-1994
1Brochuresn.d.
1Brochure Planning Notesn.d., 1990
1Bus and Subway Advertisement1990-1992
Cynthia Cohen
1Notes and Correspondencen.d., 1986-1996
1Writings1983-1995
1Community Builders1990
1Community Programn.d., 1986-1987
1Computer Information Systemsn.d., 1989
1Correspondencen.d., 1983-1997
1Creation of Center1981-1982
1East Cambridge River Festival Slides1982
1Abouali Farmanfarmaian1992
Financial
1Annual Information (7 folders)1988-1994
1Correspondence, General Information, and Notesn.d., 1987-1992
1Insurance Policy1993
Taxes
1Automatic Data Processingn.d., 1996
1Federal 990EZ Forms1991-1993
1IRS Correspondence1983-1996
1Massachusetts Annual Reports1992-1994
1State and Local Correspondencen.d., 1984-1996
Funding
1Correspondence and Notesn.d., 1986-1994, 1997
1Direct Solicitationn.d., 1989
1Donation Letter Requests and Phone Scriptsn.d., 1986-1997
1Donor Listsn.d., 1989-1991
1Emergency Fund Driven.d., 1989-1992
1House Partiesn.d., 1989-1991
1Individual Donors (2 folders)n.d., 1989-1997
1Loansn.d., 1987-1996
1Major Donor Campaigns (4 folders)1989-1992
1Matching Grants and Giftsn.d., 1989-1997
1Requests for General Operating Support1983-1998
1Lotus Philanthropy Programn.d., 1989-1993
1Massachusetts Cultural Council (2 folders)1991-1996
2Patricia Goudvisn.d., 1991
2Marketing Committeen.d., 1992
2Jennifer McKennan.d., 1989-1991, 1997
2Kieran Mead-Wardn.d., 1992
2Deborah Meccan.d.
2Noe Medinan.d.
2Meetings1982-1989
2Kristin Metzn.d., 1989-1990
2Mission Statement and Background Informationn.d., 1989-1990
2National Dissemination of Curriculum Guiden.d., 1990
2Newsletters1988-1995
2Offshoot Projectsn.d., 1988-1989
Oral History Center
2Informational Postern.d.
21Logon.d.
21Recognition Awards1987, 1990
2Photographsn.d., 1989
Oral History Festival
2General1987
2Photographs1988
2, 23Slides (2 folders)1987, 1988
2Organizational Planning Committeen.d., 1989-1990
Personnel
2Consultanciesn.d., 1987-1992
2Correspondence, Job Descriptions, Notesn.d., 1988-1992, 1996
2Policyn.d., 1988-1992
2Florinda Plan.d., 1991-1996
2Plan for Stability, Growth, and Effectiveness1986
2Planning Framework for Next Five Years1995
2Planning Retreat1987
2Carrie Pratt1991-1996
2Program Quotesn.d., 1987-1992
2Publicityn.d., 1992
2Questionnairen.d.
2Resource Center (6 folders)n.d., 1978-1994
2Resource Guides Listing the Centern.d., 1991-1994
2Vera Rosenbluthn.d., 1992
2Steering Committeen.d.,1991-1992
2Julia Surbinn.d., 1991-1992
2Tenth Anniversary Celebration1991-1992
Tufts University
2Experimental College1991
2Management and Community Development Institute1993
University of Massachusetts - Amherst
2Arts Extension Servicen.d.
2Racial Problems1992
Unidentified
20Personal Storiesn.d.
20Photographsn.d.
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Series:

2. Northeastern University, 1991-1997
Volume:0.25 cubic ft.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical
Summary:

The second series documents the relationship between the Oral History Center and Northeastern University. It covers the aspects of the Oral History Center's work that showed significant change due to its affiliation with Northeastern in July 1995. Included are projects and information in which both groups play an equal role.
BoxTitleDate
2Ed Bullinsn.d., 1996-1997
2Center for Innovation in Urban Educationn.d., 1991-1997
2Concept Paper1996
2Creating Choicesn.d.
2Correspondence and Notesn.d., 1997
2Funding Proposals (2 folders)1997
2General Information1995
2History-Social Studies School-College Alliancen.d., 1993, 1998
2Workshop for Elementary Teachersn.d.
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Series:

3. Consultancies, 1982-1998
Volume:0.25 cubic ft.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical
Summary:

This series documents projects in which the Oral History Center was involved but was not the primary sponsor. This includes projects in which the center was used as a consultant, was part of a larger group, or when a project was done cooperatively with another organization.
BoxTitleDate
3Around the Corner1984
3Boston Public School Cultural Partnershipn.d., 1991-1992
3Bureau of Jewish Education1992
3Cambridge Public Schools1986, 1993
3Cambridge Community Life Project1992
3City Year Collaborationn.d.
3East Cambridge Unity Committeen.d., 1982-1983
3Hull Lifesaving Museum1986
3The Huntington Theatre Company/Stagesn.d., 1992-1993, 1997-1998
3In Our Own Words1997
3Literacy Voices of America1992
3Roxbury Community College Collaborationn.d., 1988
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Series:

4. Workshops, 1981-1993
Volume:0.25 cubic ft.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical
Summary:

This series documents the numerous workshops sponsored by the Oral History Center between 1981 and 1993. This series also includes information about workshops in which a member of the Oral History Center had a prominent role, such as a speaker of leader of a workshop. Also covered in the series are workshops that members attended on topics dealing with oral history and managing non-profit organizations.
BoxTitleDate
3Cambridge Public Schools Teachers1984
3Correspondence and Notesn.d., 1981, 1990, 1993
3Cultural Diversity (2 folders)n.d., 1985-1987
3Flyersn.d., 1987
3For Community Workers1983
3Harvard Medical School1993
3Lesley Collegen.d.
3Literacy, Empowerment, and Academic Achievement1988
3Literacy Through Life Stories1993
3Lowell Conference on Industrial History1993
3Oral History Networkn.d.
3Oral History Network Meetingn.d.
3Salem State Reading Institute1993
3Six Week Coursen.d.
3“Sources of Strength”n.d.
3Toronto Literacy Program1988
3Urbanistics Senior Center1992
3Using Oral History in the Classroomn.d.
Workshops Attended
3Dillion Bustin at Massachusetts Council1986
3Literacy and Educational Reform1991
3Narrative Studies in the Social Sciences1992
3Paolo Freire Conference1991-1992
3We're All in This Together1991
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Series:

5. Projects, 1978-1997
Volume:6.65 cubic ft.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical
Summary:

The largest series in the collection documents the oral history projects of the Oral History Center. This series contains information regarding all aspects of the projects, including documentation of the participants, funding information, evaluations, photographs, slides, and, in some cases, the actual final product. The most prominent projects are the Griots of Roxbury, Lifelines, and the Cambridge Women's Oral History Project. Researchers should note that records of the nine projects affiliated with the Cambridge Women's Oral History Project are filed alphabetically by project title.
BoxTitleDate
Cambridge Women's Oral History Project
3Advisory Boardn.d., 1981
3Background Informationn.d., 1980-1981, 1990
3Documentary and Slideshown.d.
3Evaluationsn.d., 1980-1982
23Exhibit Text1980-1981
3Funding1980-1981
3Narrator Transcripts (5 folders)1980-1981
Photographs
3General (2 folders)n.d.
3Narratorsn.d.
3Press Articlesn.d., 1981-1983
Slides
23General (2 folders)n.d.
3Agassiz Clubn.d.
3International Women's Day 1981-1982
4Narrators n.d.
4Practice Rollsn.d.
21Tin Logon.d.
4Training Guidelinesn.d., 1980-1981
Cambridge Women's Quilt Project
4Artworkn.d.
4Background Information and Correspondencen.d., 1981-1986
4Fundingn.d., 1981-1982
21International Women's Day1988
4Narrator Transcripts (4 folders)1982
Photographs
4General (2 folders)n.d.
4Belize Rural Women's Associationn.d.
4Press Articlesn.d., 1982-1985
23Project Binder (3 folders)n.d., 1981-1982
24Quilt n.d.
21Quilt Squares on Papern.d.
4Slides n.d., 1982
4A Celebration of Community: Art for Central Square Station1985
City Voices of Lawrence and Somerville
4Generaln.d., 1990-1991
21Posters Made in Quilt Formn.d.
21Project of a Kindergartner at St. Ann'sn.d.
Common Threads
4Audience Evaluationn.d.
4Background Information and Planning Notesn.d., 1982-1984
4Community Contactsn.d.
4Final Project1986
4Funding1983-1985
4Narrator Transcripts (3 folders)1982-1985
4Outreachn.d., 1982-1986
5A Patchwork of Our Lives: 5 Photographs (2 folders)n.d.
5Press Articlesn.d., 1983-1985
5Progress Report by Cindy Cohen1983
Slides
5, 23General (2 folders)n.d.
5Slideshown.d.
5Community Education Teamn.d., 1986
5Enhancing Children's Writing and Intellectual Skillsn.d.
From Hearing My Mother Talk
5Final Product and Rough Draft1979
5Narrator Transcriptsn.d.
5Notes and Informationn.d., 1978-1982
Griots of Roxbury
5Advisory Paneln.d., 1991-1993
5Annual Budgetsn.d., 1992-1994
5Articles on Griots and Youth Violencen.d., 1992-1994
5“Coping with Violence in the Schools”1992-1993
5Correspondence1993
Dillaway-Thomas Housen.d., 1992-1993
5“Exploring the Impact of Violence of the Lives of Adolescents”1993
5Funding (5 folders)1991-1995
5Gift Requests1994-1995
5Interviews (2 folders)n.d., 1992-1993
5Out of Bounds Conference1993
FF1/D10Posters of Childrenn.d.
5Project Informationn.d., 1991-1993
20Quilts on 'What Violence Is'n.d.
5Racism Project by Nikki Giovanni1994
5Slides1993
5Summer Internsn.d., 1991-1993, 1997
5“You Got a Story to Tell”1994
5Headstart - Jamaica Plainn.d., 1992-1994
5Homeless Voices/Spare Changen.d., 1992-1996
6Issues in Urban Life: Funding (3 folders)1994-1995
The King Connection
6General Informationn.d., 1989-1990
6“Our Stories”n.d., 1988
Photographs
65th Grade Quilt Project1989-1990
6King Schooln.d.
6“Our Stories”n.d., 1988
6Slidesn.d., 1988
Learning from Our Lives
6Applicants and Participantsn.d., 1994-1996
6Correspondence and Notesn.d., 1995-1996
6Funding (3 folders)1993-1996
Let Life Be Yours
6Background Informationn.d.
6Evaluations1981-1982
6Funding1982-1983
6Planning and Imagesn.d., 1982
21Poem and Project Excerptsn.d.
6Press Articles Releases and Public Showingsn.d., 1981-1983, 1993
Slides
6Deja Que La Vida Seu Tuya (Spanish Slideshow)n.d.
6Faca Que A Vida Seja Seu (Portuguese Slideshow)n.d.
6Kite La Via Pou Nou (Haitian - Creole Slideshow)n.d.
6Screening Slideshown.d.
6Slideshown.d.
6Copyn.d.
6Master Copy (2 folders)n.d.
6Historical Photographsn.d.
6Transcriptsn.d.
Lifelines
7Background Informationn.d., 1986-1989
7Case Studyn.d., 1987-1988, 1992
7Committees, Correspondence, and Notesn.d., 1986-1989
7Educational Model Proposaln.d.
7Financial and Funding Recordsn.d., 1985-1989
7Mailing List1991
7The Mango Tree1987-1996
7Photographsn.d.
7Resource Centern.d., 1988-1989
Slides
7Canvas Muraln.d.
7Children's Artworkn.d., 1985-1986
7The Mango Tree, Harrington School Reactionsn.d.
7Unidentifiedn.d.
7Year One Exhibit at Cambridge Rindge and Latin School1986
7Trainingn.d., 1988-1989
21Travelling Exhibit1988-1989
7Workshop by Lee Min Mo1989
Lifelines Project
7Steve Barkin: Graham and Parks School, 7th and 8th Grade, “Labor History” (includes slides)1985-1986
7Marcia Baynes: Longfellow School, 6th Grade, “Growing Up in Cambridge” (includes photographs)1985-1986
7Pat Berkley: Graham and Parks School, 5th Grade, “We Are Proud Of Who We Are” (includes photographs and slides)1985-1986
7Pat Berkley: Graham and Parks School, 5th Grade, “Haiti/We Care” (includes photographs)1985-1986
7Pat Berkley: Graham and Parks School, 7th and 8th Grade, “Reflections on Peace and Freedom”1987-1988
7Pat Berkley: Graham and Parks School, “Feeling Proud” (includes slides)1988-1989
7Pat Berkley: Graham and Parks School, Unidentified Projectn.d.
7Danielle Conway: Tobin School, 5th Grade, “Family Trees” (includes photographs and slides)1985-1986
7Danielle Conway: Tobin School, 5th Grade, “Interviewing Our Grandparents” (includes slides)1986-1987
7Danielle Conway: Tobin School, 5th Grade, “Russell School Neighborhood Project” (includes slides)1987-1988
7Danielle Conway: Tobin School, 5th Grade, “My Memories”n.d.
7A. Gargano and C. Gaile: Morse School, 8th Grade, “Morse School, 100th Anniversary Quilt”n.d.
7Kathy Greely: Graham and Parks School, 7th and 8th Grade, “Central Square Through Our Eyes”1986-1987
7MaryBeth Haynes: Longfellow School, 8th Grade, “Trials and Triumphs” (includes photographs and slides)1985-1986
7MaryBeth Haynes: Longfellow School, 8th Grade, “The Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1965: The Movement and Its Impact” (includes photographs)1986-1987
7MaryBeth Haynes: Longfellow School, 8th Grade, “Vietnam Remembered” (includes slides)1987-1988
7MaryBeth Haynes: Longfellow School, 8th Grade, Interview Reflection Writings by Students1988-1989
7Fran Hiller: King School, 3rd and 4th Grade, “Family Stories” (includes slides)1987-1988
7S. Hughes and K. Hart: Agassiz School, 4th and 5th Grade, “Family Stories”n.d.
7L. Jennings, S. Hughes, and K. Hart: Agassiz School, 4th and 5th Grade, “Growing Up and Living in Cambridge” (includes slides)1987-1988
7Joe Pagliaro: Morse School, 5th Grade, “Family Stories”1985-1986
7J. Patterson and B. Tracy: Longfellow School, 2nd Grade, “A Storybook Quilt” (includes slides)n.d.
7Marina Seevak: Tobin School, 4th and 5th Grade, “Growing Up in My Homeland... Living Here Now”1988-1989
7Ruth Shea: Tobin School, 4th Grade, “What Were Your Parents Doing in 1968?” (includes photographs)1988-1989
7Ruth Shea: Tobin School, 4th Grade, “Stories of Our Family Heroes”1991-1992
7Harrington School, 3rd Grade, “Where in the World Did You Come From?” (includes slides)n.d.
7New Found Voicesn.d., 1984-1986
A Passion For Life
7Brochures and Press Articlesn.d., 1989-1990
7Correspondence, Evaluations, notesn.d., 1987-1991
7Directions Committeen.d., 1989-1990
7Final Projectn.d.
7Financial and Funding Recordsn.d., 1985-1990
8Interview Guidelinesn.d., 1987-1989
Photographs
8Generaln.d.
21Quaker Meeting in Ramallah, Palestinen.d.
21Unidentified Palestinian Womenn.d.
21Project Postern.d.
8Slidesn.d.
8Student Papers1989
8People Are Stories/Bringing Stories to Lifen.d., 1987-1993, 1998
8Preservation and Consolidation Projectn.d., 1983-1984
8Tom Sleigh: Lila Wallace Readers Digest Writers Award1992-1996
8Somerville Video Portraitsn.d.
Stories in Fabric
8General Informationn.d., 1984-1986, 1990
8Photographs (5 folders)n.d.
8Slidesn.d., 1984
8Talking on Water1997
8Touchable Stories1996
Transitions in Women's Lives
8Azorean Lettersn.d.
8Background Informationn.d., 1981
8Funding1981-1982
8Haitian Creole Script and Outreachn.d.
8Portuguese Script and Outreachn.d., 1982
8Spanish Script, Outreach, and Poemn.d., 1982
8Unidentified Interview Cardsn.d.
8Voices from the Caribbeann.d.
Voices of Lawrence/Voices of Teens
8Fundingn.d., 1991-1993
8Student Workn.d.
The Way Things Were/Jest Us
8Background Informationn.d., 1982
8Narrator Transcriptsn.d.
8Photographsn.d.
21Project Displaysn.d.
8Rough Draft and Final Projectn.d.,
Youth Build Boston
8General Informationn.d., 1990-1991
8Slides: Bringing Down the Wisdomn.d.
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Series:

6. Audiovisual Material, 1978-1995
Volume:8.0 cubic ft.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical
Summary:

This series contains audio-visual documentation of the Oral History Center's activities, particularly the collection of oral histories. Formats include VHS tapes, 3/4 inch UMATIC tapes, 8mm tapes, audio reel-to-reel tapes, and audio cassettes. Audio cassettes are the most extensive. The majority of the material comes from the Cambridge Women's Oral History Project, its related spin-offs, and the Lifelines Project. There is a small amount of audio material dealing with the administration of the Oral History Center, including recordings of retreats and meetings.
BoxTitleDate
8 mm Recordings
9Basketball Tournament (2 tapes)1995
9Billie-Jo Davis: Interview of Josephine Perez (2 tapes)n.d.
9Elders at Martin Luther King Day1995
9Marshall, Terry1995
9Basketball1995
9“Hanging Out”1995
9Interview (2 tapes)n.d.
9Paprilla, Austria: South End Violence (2 tapes)n.d.
9Unidentifiedn.d.
Audio: Cassettes
10Action for Boston Community Development (ABCD) Workshop18 Feb 1994
Bridging Our Lives Workshop
10Evaluation by Berta Berriz, Dolores Goode, and Kristen Metz15 Jan 1991
10Last Class17 Dec 1990
10Model Interview: Kristen Metz interviewing Judith Glaubman10 Dec 1990
Bringing Stories to Light
10Model Interview: Kristen Metz interviewing Michael Barrish2 Mar 1991
10Workshop Sample Interview: Kristen Metz interviewing Debra Mecca14 Mar 1992
Cambridge Women's Oral History Project
10Cambridge Rindge and Latin School Meeting with High School Students about Projectn.d.
10CAPS Preliminary Interview by Cindy Cohen of Christine Cabral, Rae Dedman, and Ronda Deegan21 Nov 1980
10Evaluation Meeting (2 tapes)Apr 1981
10Excerpts of Storiesn.d.
10Immigration Workshop (2 tapes)n.d.
Interviews
10Winona Boardley (2 tapes)n.d.
10Gloria da Silvan.d.
10Iola Houtmann.d.
10Henrietta Jackson (3 tapes)n.d.
10Jessica'sn.d.
10Magie Maturin and Cindy Cohen by Ann Marie Milhommen.d.
10Ann Marie Milhomme by Cindy Cohenn.d.
10Teodocia Rodriguezn.d.
10Catherine Zirpolon.d.
10Practice Tapes (9 tapes)n.d.
10Radio Show of Mary Perry Alldithn.d.
10Relationship Workshopn.d.
10-11Training Tapes (4 tapes)n.d., 1980-1981
11Transfer Dub Tapen.d.
11Volunteer Meeting Discussionn.d.
11Work (2 tapes)n.d.
11Workshop on Black Women's Lives for the New England Association of Oral Historyn.d.
11Workshop on Growing Older at Cambridge Library (2 tapes)n.d.
Cambridge Women's Oral History Project: Evaluation
Interviews by Cindy Cohen
11Melissa Alonson1981
11Colleen Bolger1981
11Christine Cabral1981
11Kate Ellis1981
11Hermina Fernandes and Graca Arruda1981
11Hopey Fitzpatrick1981
11Gloria Herrera (2 tapes)1981
11Morgan Neville1981
11Jessica Rich1981
11Sharon Ryan1981
11Odilia Silva (2 tapes)1981
11Margaret Sparks1981
11Tracy Villereale (2 tapes)1981
Cambridge Women's Quilt Project
22Q1: Claudette LeComte, Janice Stephens1982
22Q2: Maria Luis, Madelena Friasn.d.
22Q4: Olga Melo, Gina Liman.d.
22Q5: Beverly Shear, Sarah Bansenn.d.
22Q6: Judith Liman.d.
22Q7: Bonnie Acker, Darcy Marshalln.d.
22Q8: Pattie Frances (slow speed), Robyn Thurstonn.d.
22Q9: Winona Boardley, Catherine Queenn.d.
22Q12: Mary Sclandra, Mary Andellan.d.
22Q13: Maria Ravanis, Heather Stowelln.d.
22Q14: Iola Houtman, Pattie Chasen.d.
22Q15: Shirlee Christophel, Jean Riouxn.d.
22Q16: Janet Mathews, Nancy Kerrn.d.
22Q17: Debbie Cohen, Pallas Lombard (wrong speed)n.d.
22Q18: Terry Wright, Gloria Herreran.d.
22Q22: Lillian Hanscome, Sara Jovrabackin.d.
22Q23: Romaine Doricenten.d.
22Q25: Mary Garron, Carrie Richardsonn.d.
22Q26: Louise Cauchon, Paulette Francisn.d.
22Q28: Vicky Wolf, Cindy Cohenn.d.
22Q30: Violet Jackson, Zuleka Queenn.d.
22Q31: Women's Center - Judith Norrisn.d.
22Q35: Elizabeth Bouviern.d.
11CEOC Classes21 Jan 1982
Cohen, Cindy: Interviews
11General23 May 1986
11About Her Involvement in the Center6 Jun 1992
11Bonnie Burt1 Dec 1980
City Voices: Wetherbee School, Lawrence, Massachusetts
11General1991
11All Class Tape19 Jan 1991
11Enrique Benitez: Class (3 tapes)1991
11Lynn Cox: Class, April 221991
11-12Betsy Kimball: Class (4 tapes)1991
12Kristen Metz: Interviewing a Class about “Starting Over”n.d.
Common Threads
12General1982-1983
12Exhibition Opening1 Nov 1983
Interviews
12Mary Andella by Lyndsay Frenchn.d.
12Shirlee Christophel by Sarah Bensonn.d.
12Agnes Darlington (2 tapes)n.d.
12Maria Fragoso, Maria by Cindy Cohenn.d.
12Kathy Galanopoulos by Cindy Cohenn.d.
12Gloria Herrera by Cindy Cohenn.d.
12Shew Gee Li, Shew Gee by Eva Chann.d.
12Rosario Morales by Cindy Cohen (2 tapes)n.d.
12Rosario Morales, Olga Silva and Kathy Galanopoulus by Cindy Cohenn.d.
12Margaret Primack (2 tapes)n.d.
12Theodocia Rodriguez by Florinda Pla in Spanishn.d.
12Olga Sliva by Cindy Cohen (2 tapes)n.d.
12Froso Sundlavedes and Kathy Galanopoulos by Cindy Cohenn.d.
12Susan Thompson by Cindy Cohen (2 tapes)n.d.
12Marie Yolette Val by Cindy Cohenn.d.
12Slideshow Script (2 tapes)n.d.
12Slideshow Soundtrackn.d.
12Community Program Council19 Nov 1986
12East Cambridge Riverfest: Collected Storiesn.d.
East Cambridge Unity Committee: Interviews
12Maria Cordeira1983
12Joe G. Geary, John T. Geary, and David T. Geary, Julie Geloutsky, Thelma Smith, Helen Botelho, Mary Ann Capucci, and Donna Cappucci1983
12John Geary1983
12Julie Geloutsky1983
12Thelma Smith, Helen Botelho, Mary Ann Capucci, and Donna Cappucci1983
12Fr.Vertselis1983
From Hearing My Mother Talk: Interviews
12Beatrice Ewing by Cindy Cohen3 Nov 1978
12Genevive Halsam by Connie Breece16 Nov 1978
13Martha Harron by Connie Breece3 Nov 1978
13Florence Luscomb by Cindy Cohenn.d.
13Parris Luscomb and Florence Luscomb by Cindy Cohenn.d.
13Helen O'Rourke, Marie Beck and Betty Mahoney by Connie Breecen.d.
13Catherine Peterson by Cindy Cohenn.d.
13Elinor Rowe by Cindy Cohenn.d.
13Catherine Sprague by Connie Breecen.d.
13Elsa Stern by Cindy Cohen (2 tapes)n.d.
13Pauline Swift and Mabel Levarity by Cindy Cohenn.d.
13Pauline Swift by Cindy Cohen1978-1979
Griots of Roxbury
13General1991-1994
13Comments Tape from Griots ExhibitApr-May 1994
13Egleston Square High School7 Apr 1994
13Exhibit Reaction Tape21 Jun 1994
13Griots Discussion: Wrapping up the Project (2 tapes)21 Jun 1994
13Griots Music Soundtrackn.d.
13“You've Got A Story To Tell”: Commentsn.d.
13“Johnny's Song,” by Steve Mason (Poetry of a Vietnam Veteran)1986
13Kane School, Bilingual Class, Lawrence, Massachusetts3 Mar 1990
Kieran Mead-Ward School, Community Service Project at Graham-Parks School: Interviews
13Florina Pla1992
13Carrie Richardson1 Apr 1992
13Lawrence Public/Parochial School Training: Evaluation by Teachers (2 tapes)31 May 1990
13Learning from Our Lives: Planning Meeting (2 tapes)2 Mar 1995
Let Life Be Yours: Voices of Cambridge Working Women
13Arts Council Tapen.d.
13Composite Master Tape: Early Draft (2 tapes)n.d.
13Dub from Master Reel of 1981 (2 tapes)Jun 1987
13Haitian Folk Musicn.d.
Haitian Creole
13Interviews Translation1 Dec 1981
13Translation of Program (4 tapes)n.d.
14July Versionn.d.
14Master Mix Tape12 Mar 1988
Portuguese
14Translation (3 tapes)n.d.
14Interviews Translationn.d.
14Planning Sessionn.d.
14Radio Promotion and Edited Interviewsn.d.
14Slide Show Program1981
Spanish
14Interviews Translation1 Dec 1981
14Translation of Programs (3 tapes)n.d.
14Unidentified Translationsn.d.
14Lifelines Celebration4 mar 1986
Lifelines Evaluations
14Steve Barkin and Pat Berkley at Graham-Parks Schooln.d.
14Marcia Baynes at Longfellow Schooln.d.
14Marcia Baynes and MaryBeth Haynes at Longfellow School25 Mar 1986
14Pat Berkley at Graham-Parks School26 Mar 1986
14Marilyn Brownlie at Longfellow School; Joe Pagliaro at Morse School, 25 Mar 1986; Len Solo at Graham-Parks School26 Mar 1986
14Danielle Conway at Tobin Schooln.d.
14MaryBeth Haynes at Longfellow Schooln.d.
14Daniel Kelly and Danielle Conway at Tobin School27 Mar 1986
14Joe Pagliaron.d.
14Lifelines Training of Trainers Teacher Panel DiscussionApr 1989
Lifelines Project
Marcia Baynes at Longfellow School, 6th Grade: “Growing Up in Cambridge” Interviews
14Mr. Bourne1986-1987
14Mrs. Browning1986-1987
14Dr. Grace Gardner1986-1987
Pat Berkley at Graham-Parks School, 5th Grade: “We Are Proud of Who We Are”1985-1986
14Haitian Slideshow Tape
14Haitian Tape Script
Interviews
14Dr. Jean Baptiste
14Dr. Jean Baptiste and Guerdes Fleurant
14Fritz Dossous
14Guerdes Fleurant
14Josiane Hudicourt-Barnes
14Slide-tape Narration
MaryBeth Haynes at Longfellow School, 8th Grade: “Trials and Triumphs”
15, 22Final Project Audio Recording (2 versions)n.d.
Interviews
15Mary AndellaDec 1985
15Isabelle Diekewicz3 Feb 1986
15Georgianna Jonesn.d.
15Catherine E. Maytum10 Dec 1985
15Carrie Richardson13 Nov 1985
15Catherine Smith10 Dec 1985
15Delia Souzan.d.
Practice Interviews
15Francesca Brotman-Orner with Mother27 Oct 1985
15David Fitzpayne with Mothern.d.
15Ingrid Kleespies with Mother22 Oct 1985
15Jessica Shattuck with Mothern.d.
15Unidentified Student with Mothern.d.
M. Seevak at Tobin School, 4th Grade: “Growing Up in My Homeland... Living Here Now” Interviews
15Mary AndellaFeb 1989
15Contanza EggersFeb 1989
15MarcoFeb 1989
15Paul YuFeb 1989
15V. Swoboda at Tobin School, 7th Grade: “Taking a Stand” Interview of Lupe Tovares23 jan 1989
Metz, Kristen: Interviews
15Andrea, a Women's Studies Student at Mount Holyoke5 Mar 1991
15For WUMB “From the Source”18 Dec 1990
15Young Class in Bostonn.d.
15New Found Voices: “Gajes:” Interview by Stacie Martinelli1986
Northeastern University Centennial: Interviews for Chapter in “Tradition and Innovation” by K. Fitzgerald, J. Fraser and E. Jackson
15Ruth Batson9 Mar 1995
15Paula Clark12 Apr 1996
15Gregory Coffin17 Jul 1996
15Mel King3 Dec 1996
15Kenneth Ryder4 Dec 1996
Oral History Center Board Meeting
15With Cindy Cohen27 Jun 1996
15With Kristen Metz11 Jun 1996
15Oral History Center Story Sharing Event7 Apr 1988
15Oral History Center at Bedford Unitarian Church, Bedford, Massachusetts4 Oct 1987
15Oral History Center Retreat (5 tapes)27 Jan 1990
15Oral History Center Board Retreatn.d.
15Oral History: A Tool for Advocates Workshop #113 Mar 1990
16A Passion for Life: Direction Committee Evaluation10 Aug 1989
A Patchwork of Our Lives
16Quilt Song1982
16Quilt Song Rehearsal6 Jul 1982
16Program Report Bookn.d.
16Carrie Richardson: Interview16 Dec 1986
16Stories in Fabric: Individual Descriptions of Tapestriesn.d.
The Way Things Were/Jest Us: Interviews
16Zelma Evelyn by Group of ChildrenFall 1982
16Lydia McLean by Group of ChildrenFall 1982
16Virginia Stephenson by Group of ChildrenFall 1982
16Trainers Discussion21 Jul 1992
Training of Trainers
16General5 Feb 1990
16Institute for Educators (3 tapes)n.d.
Unidentified Interviews
22Ana's Interview with May, Susan Thompsonn.d.
22Betsy Rose at Children's MuseumMay 1985
16Class Interviewing Immigrant Panamanian Womenn.d.
16Girl Discussing Her Involvement with the Oral History Centern.d.
16Small Group Telling and Discussing Storiesn.d.
16Stacie's Interview with PhilomeineSpring 1986
Unidentified Project: Interviews
16Rita Bettencourt and Luisa Goncalvesn.d.
16Maria Cabral and Natercia Manitan.d.
16Natalia Costa and Maria Peixoton.d.
16Assuncao Goncalves and Maria Monten.d.
16Maria Quelhan.d.
16Guiomar Santos and Lucy Camaran.d.
16Maria Viega and Ernestina Pereiran.d.
Youth Build Boston
16Group 1: Discussion on History6 Mar 1991
Interviews
16Edson Auguste by Kristin Metz6 Aug 1991
16Kevin Barr and Rudy27 Feb 1991
16Victor Burgos by Kristin Metz2 Apr 1991
16Kevin Dixon and Manny27 Feb 1991
16Cynthia Fletcher by Michael and Marian.d.
16Mr. Fletcher by Luis, Tracey, Victor and Maria19 Mar 1991
16Delacy Glover and ?(Night Jones) by Ralph Lace Waim6 Mar 1991
16Marvis Grant (Teacher) and Kevin12 Mar 1991
16Ms. Haskins by Kevin Dixon, Ray Rushin, Maria Gonzalez and Rudolph Griffith26 Mar 1991
16Helen Horner at Fields Corner1991 Mar 19
16Helen Horner by Joe Willis, Edson Auguste, Brian Newberry, Victor Burgos and Ralph Bocoten.d.
16Roschell Jones by Kristen Metz23 Jul 1991
17Thomas Brent2 Jul 1991
17Luis Lopez and Aaron Hall6 Mar 1991
17Victor Melodie, Maria and Verneice6 Mar 1991
17Mike and Edgar27 Feb 1991
17Miss Thomas Miner by Ray, Vincent, and Edgarn.d.
17Mrs. Mary Pam by Rudy and Manny (2 tapes)12 Mar 1991
17Steve Perry by Vincent, Edgar, and Michael26 Mar 1991
17Kevin Dixon: Reading Trial Scriptn.d.
17Slide-tape Show: History of Roxbury19 Aug 1991
22Women's History Tape: Sistersn.d.
Audio: Reel-to-Reel
18Cambridge Women's Oral History Project Master MixJul 1981
Let Life Be Yours
18Edited Four Minute Piecen.d.
18Edited Narration, Original Mastern.d.
18Feature Headsn.d.
18Haitian Creole versionn.d.
18Intro “A”n.d.
18Intro “B”n.d.
18Master Mixn.d.
18Narrator Outtakesn.d.
18Original Interviews in Foreign Languagesn.d.
18Outtakesn.d.
18Portuguese Versionn.d.
18Spanish Versionn.d.
18Translationsn.d.
18Cindy Marshalln.d.
18Unidentified (2 tapes)n.d.
¾ Inch UMATIC Recordings
19“A Life of Song”: A Portrait of Ruth Rubin1985
19Griots: “Beyond the Classroom”1994 Jan 20
19Let Life Be Yours (2 copies)1981
19Unidentifiedn.d.
VHS Recordings
19Common Threadsn.d.
19“Folk Roots New Roots: Defining Tradition”n.d.
19Carolyn Graham: Oral History Center Training7 Nov 1986
19Griots of Roxbury: “Beyond the Classroom”20 Jan 1994
19King Connection: Radio Play and Mural22 May 1990
19Let Life Be Yours (2 copies)1981
19“A Life of Song: Cindy Marshall”n.d.
19Kristin Kristin: Oral History Center Interviewn.d.
19Oral History Center Interviews12 May 1992
19Reading Rainbow: The Patchwork Quiltn.d.
19Something to be Heard (2 copies)n.d.
19Teacher Training5 Dec 1986
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