Previous Press Releases

Current Press Releases


Northeastern University's Historical Photographs Available Online

Northeastern's Historical PhotographsDean Wilfred Lake teaching a marketing class, 1940.

Northeastern University has a rich past dating back to the late 1800s when it was part of the YMCA of Greater Boston. This history has been documented in the many photographs carefully preserved in the University Libraries' Archives and Special Collections Department. More than 4,000 of these photographs are now searchable online in the latest digital collection: Northeastern's Historical Photographs (http://www.lib.neu.edu/nuphotos). This compilation is a growing body of images relating to the University from 1902 to the present. In it, researchers will find representations of academic programs, student life, faculty, the campus, athletics, and University events including commencement. Images that are not yet available electronically are accessible by visiting the Archives and Special Collections Department in 92 Snell Library.

If you are interested in ordering an image or viewing any of the original images in this collection, or for more information, please contact the Archives: archives@neu.edu.

Back to Top


Records of the Bisexual Resource Center Available for Research

The historical records of the Bisexual Resource Center are now open for research. A guide to the collection is available online at: http://www.library.neu.edu/archives/collect/findaids/m144findprint.htm.

Bisexual Resource Center Boston Bisexual Women's Network march, June 1989.

The Bisexual Resource Center (formerly the East Coast Bisexual Network) is a Boston-based non-profit organization founded in 1985. Originally established as an umbrella group to facilitate organizing among bisexual groups on the East Coast, the organization expanded to include national and international bisexual groups. The BRC was founded concurrently with the first groups devoted specifically to bisexual political activism. In the late 1980s, the group made HIV / AIDS education and activism a priority, as bisexual men and women were popularly accused of transferring the disease from gay males to lesbians and the straight population. During the 1990s, the organization worked to control misinformation as bisexuality gained visibility in the mainstream media. The Bisexual Resource Center continues to build alliances among, and combat biphobia within the gay, lesbian, and transgender communities.

The collection contains records generated by the BRC and materials collected for the organization's in-house resource library. The 11.5 linear feet of material dates from 1983-2002 and includes administrative materials, newsletters and magazines, scholarly papers, articles from the LGBT and mainstream media, conference packets, and audiovisual materials. A highlight of this collection is the thorough documentation of the nationwide preparation for, participation in, and response to the 1993 March on Washington for Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Equal Rights.

The Bisexual Resource Center collection is open for research Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., in the Northeastern University Libraries, Archives and Special Collections Department, 92 Snell Library, Boston, Massachusetts. For a list of all of the Department's special collections, see: http://www.library.neu.edu/archives/collections/manuscript_collections/.

February 2009



Back to Top


Freedom House Photographs, Available Online

A digital resource of more than 2400 images, "Roxbury People, Places and Events, 1950-1975," is now available online at: http://www.lib.neu.edu/freedomhouse.

Freedom House Photographs Roxbury Garden Project, 1960. Photo by Irene Shwachman.

Freedom House was founded in 1949 by social workers Otto P. and Muriel S. Snowden. The initial goal of Freedom House was to centralize community activism in the fight for neighborhood improvement, good schools, and harmony among racial, ethnic, and religious groups in Roxbury, Massachusetts. Freedom House went on to play critical roles in urban renewal in Roxbury and in the desegregation of the Boston Public Schools. A guide to the entire Freedom House Collection may be viewed at http://www.library.neu.edu/archives/collect/findaids/m16find.htm.

The digitization of the images was made possible in part through a grant from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services through the Library Services and Technology Act administered by the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners.

Back to Top


Boston Coalition of Black Women Records, Available for Research

The historical records of the Boston Coalition of Black Women, Inc., are now open for research. A guide to the collection is available online at: http://www.library.neu.edu/archives/collect/findaids/M146find.htm.

Boston Coalition of Black Women
Sister to Sister Bake Sale, November 1998

The Boston Coalition of Black Women, Inc. was formed in 1991 as a chapter of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women to provide African-American women in Boston with a social and political forum. The Boston Chapter was chartered as the largest founding chapter in the history of the National Coalition. The members of the Boston Chapter voted to leave the National Coalition in 1996 and form the Boston Coalition of Black Women, Inc. The organization sought to provide leadership and access to resources to allow members to become involved in the community through education, social, economic, and civil action. Work sponsored by the organization has included mentoring opportunities, primarily the Sister-to-Sister program, and fundraising and cultural events, including two "Between Sisters" conferences, bringing together women from all over the United States for a three-day conference covering issues including healthcare, women's history, cultural trends, and parental responsibility. In 2000, in addition to its original programs and activities, the Coalition adopted a public policy agenda focused on education and legislation involving women and children. In collaboration with groups such as the Massachusetts Advocacy Center and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the Coalition monitored the development of the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System. Other activity in the community involved Coalition members mentoring girls in detention units, hosting author talks, and partnering with other community service organizations including Project Bread and Morgan Memorial Goodwill Industries.

The records date from 1993-2007 and include minutes, memoranda, correspondence, conference packets, financial records, newsletters, and photographs.

The Boston Coalition of Black Women, Inc., collection is open for research Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., in the Northeastern University Libraries, Archives and Special Collections Department, 92 Snell Library, Boston, Massachusetts. For a list of all of the Department's special collections, see: http://www.library.neu.edu/archives/collections/manuscript_collections/.

September 2008



Back to Top


Papers of Latino Activist and Politician, Nelson Merced, Available for Research

The historical papers of Nelson Merced, the first Latino member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, are now open for research. A guide to the collection is available online at: http://www.lib.neu.edu/archives/collect/findaids/M125find.htm.

Nelson Merced (far right) and campaign worker (center) speaking with a voter about Merced's candidacy for the Massachusetts House of Representatives, ca. 1988. Photo: © 1988 DON WEST.

Nelson Merced was born to Puerto Rican immigrant parents in New York in 1948 and moved back and forth with his family several times before joining the United States Navy in 1965. After leaving the Navy, he lived in Puerto Rico with his parents and was active in the squatters' rights movement in San Juan. Returning to the United States in 1971, Merced came to Massachusetts in 1976. He worked for the Boston Department of Public Welfare, did graduate work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and took the position of the director of La Alianza Hispana in 1981. In 1988, he was the first Latino elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives. He held this position until 1992, running a successful re-election campaign in 1990. In 1994, Merced took a position as the CEO of Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción just prior to the organization's proposed merger with the Escuelita Agueybana Day Care Center. The merger never took place and, in 1996, Merced left the organization. In 2005, Merced took a position as the Director of National Initiatives and Applied Research with NeighborWorks America, a nonprofit sponsored by Congress.

The papers date from 1966-2002 and document Merced's campaigns as well as his activity in the State House. The focus of the collection is his work as a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, including his involvement with organizations like the Massachusetts English Plus Coalition, the Massachusetts Black Legislative Caucus, and the Mauricio Gaston Institute. During his time in the House, Merced was active in the campaign to promote and protect bilingual education in Massachusetts as well as working for immigrants' rights and the reform of the Boston Public Schools. The collection includes extensive correspondence files as well as subject files, voting records, legislative and publicity material, newsletters, and reports.

The Nelson Merced collection is open for research Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., in the Northeastern University Libraries Archives and Special Collections Department, 92 Snell Library, Boston, Massachusetts. For a list of the Department's special collections, see: http://www.library.neu.edu/archives/collections/manuscript_collections/.

July 2008



Back to Top


New Acquisition: Chinese Progressive Association Historical Records

Northeastern University Libraries is pleased to announce the acquisition of the historical records of Boston's Chinese Progressive Association, a grassroots community organization that works for full equality and empowerment of the Chinese community in Boston and beyond.

Founded on July 17, 1977 in Boston's Chinatown, the Chinese Progressive Association (CPA) supports adult education, civic empowerment, workers rights, youth leadership, and community information and referral services. It also participates in citywide and regional coalitions, including the Asian Pacific American Agenda Coalition, Boston Tenant Coalition, Civic Engagement Initiative, Fair Wage Campaign, Immigrant Workers Center Collaborative, New Majority, and Whose Boston. Among its early activities, the CPA helped found the Chinatown Housing and Land Development Task Force, worked with other activists to conduct voter registration and organize the first mayoral candidates forum in Chinatown, and joined African American and Latino community leaders to file a successful lawsuit against gerrymandering of state electoral districts. In 1986, CPA organized with dislocated garment workers from P&L Sportswear and from Beverly Rose, another sportswear manufacturer, to win the first Chinese bilingual retraining programs in New England. The following year, the CPA Workers Center was established to continue organizing immigrant workers to advocate for their rights. In 1993, CPA worked with other Chinatown organizations and the American Friends Service Committee to organize a plebiscite on the Parcel C parking garage proposed for the center of residential Chinatown, eventually winning the designation of the parcel for community development. More recently, in 2005 the organization launched its Immigrant Workers Center Collaborative to build immigrant worker organizing and solidarity in the Chinese, Brazilian, and Latino communities. In 2006, CPA strengthened ties with communities of color, tenant organizations, and housing advocates to secure changes in Boston's Inclusionary Development Policy and its definition of housing affordability in an effort to stabilize Boston neighborhoods.

The 19 linear feet of material dates from 1977-2005 and includes board and committee minutes, correspondence, grant proposals, newsletters, press clippings, and audio/visual material.

This rich collection contributes to the University Archives and Special Collection Department's collecting focus on records of private, non-profit, community-based organizations that are concerned with social justice issues. View a list of all collections available for research in the NU Archives and Special Collections Department.

February 2008

Back to Top


New Acquisition: ACT UP/Boston Historical Records

Northeastern University Libraries is pleased to announce the acquisition of the historical records of ACT UP/Boston, donated by founding members Raymond Schmidt and Stephen Skuce. ACT UP/Boston (the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power) was a diverse, nonpartisan group of people united in anger and committed to direct action to end the AIDS crisis.

Founded in December 1987 by activists Raymond Schmidt, Stephen Skuce, Donald Smith, and Paul Wychules, ACT UP/Boston was formed to focus local efforts to speed up the development of AIDS treatments, educational programs, and prevention strategies. The organization negotiated with government officials, public health policymakers, medical personnel, researchers, pharmaceutical manufacturers, and others to bring about changes to meet the demands of the AIDS crisis. When negotiations failed, they held dramatic demonstrations, sometimes employing civil disobedience, to effect changes to save lives. In January 1988, the group held its first protest at the Boston offices of the Department of Health and Human Services, regarding delays and red tape surrounding approval of AIDS treatment drugs. ACT UP/Boston's agenda included demands for a compassionate and comprehensive national policy on AIDS; a national emergency AIDS project; intensified drug testing, research, and treatment efforts; and a full-scale national educational program within reach of all. The organization held die-ins and sleep-ins, provided freshman orientation for Harvard Medical School students, negotiated successfully with a major pharmaceutical corporation, affected state and national AIDS polices, pressured health care insurers to provide coverage for people with AIDS, influenced the thinking of some of the nation's most influential researchers, served on the Commonwealth committee that created the nation's first online registry of clinical trials for AIDS treatments, distributed information and condoms to the congregation at Cardinal Law's Confirmation Sunday services at Holy Cross Cathedral in Boston, and made aerosolized pentamidine an accessible treatment in New England. The organization's motto was "Silence = Death."

The material, dating from 1987-1996, documents the organization's founding, the work of the Treatment Issues Committee, fund-raising activities, demonstrations, and treatment related as well as other campaigns. The records include board and committee minutes, correspondence, grant proposals, ACT UP publications, press clippings, flyers, clinical trial reviews, and realia.

This rich collection contributes to the University Archives and Special Collection Department's collecting focus on records of private, non-profit, community-based organizations that are concerned with social justice issues. View a list of special collections available for research in the NU Archives and Special Collections Department.

January 2008

Back to Top


Boston Foundation Persistent Poverty Project Records Available for Research

Northeastern University Libraries is pleased to announce that the historical records of the Boston Foundation Persistent Poverty Project are open for research. In 1987, the Equal Opportunity Program of the Rockefeller Foundation chose Boston along with Washington, D.C., Cleveland, San Antonio, Denver, and Oakland to be part of the Community Planning and Action Program. The aim of the program was to see how each of the six cities would develop strategies and work with the local community to analyze and reduce poverty. The Boston branch of this program became known as the Persistent Poverty Project, which ran from 1987 until 1997, publishing several reports and holding seminars, focus groups, roundtables, conferences, and briefings to involve the general public, politicians, and other community organizations. The Project was also involved in initiatives, such as the National Neighborhood Indicators Project and the National Community Building Network, and it created the Boston Children and Families Database and the Boston Community Building Curriculum. The Project continued after 1997 as the Boston Community Building Network at the Boston Foundation.

The collection documents the activities of the Boston Foundation's Persistent Poverty Project in its attempt to create a comprehensive picture of multi-generational poverty in Boston. Records reflect the day-to-day administration of the Project and document its outreach activities, including data-gathering on poverty through community roundtables, focus groups, and surveys. The collection also reflects the Project's attempts to disseminate its research through Boston College Citizen seminars, press briefings, and multiple publications. Topics documented include the effects of poverty on various communities in Boston, including African American, white, Asian American, and youth; community building; and the Project's involvement with larger organizations such as the Rockefeller Foundation and the National Community Building Network. Records include committee minutes and agendas; staff correspondence and notes; conference packets; seminar, conference, and meeting transcripts; publications; reports; and research data.

The Boston Foundation Persistent Poverty Project collection is open for research Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., in the Northeastern University Libraries, Archives and Special Collections Department, 92 Snell Library, Boston, Massachusetts. A guide to the collection is available online at: http://www.library.neu.edu/archives/collect/findaids/m127find.htm.

The collection, which was processed with partial funding from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, contributes to the University Archives and Special Collection Department's collecting focus on records of private, non-profit, community-based organizations that are concerned with social justice issues. View a list of all collections available for research in the NU Archives and Special Collections Department.

January 2008

Back to Top


Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts Historical Records Available for Research

Northeastern University Libraries is pleased to announce that the historical records of the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts are open for research. The collection, which was processed with funding from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, contributes to the University Archives and Special Collection Department's collecting focus on records of private, non-profit, community-based organizations that are concerned with social justice issues. View a list of special collections available for research in the NU Archives and Special Collections Department.

The Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts is a community-based movement devoted to empowering African Americans and other people of color to enter into the economic and social main stream. The League began its work in 1917 when a group of citizens led by Eugene Kunkle Jones met to discuss ways to help the growing number of black migrants from the South and immigrants from the West Indies find housing and employment in Boston. Once established, it became an affiliate of the National Urban League. When the League first opened, it offered the same services as settlement houses; however, its focus quickly shifted to education and employment opportunities. In 1973, the organization was incorporated as the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts, and it continues to offer programs and services that are designed to promote economic and social self sufficiency among African Americans and other communities of color in Boston. The collection documents the efforts of the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts to administer these programs. Records date from 1968-2007 and cover such topics as civil rights, school reform, race relations in the city of Boston, career development and counseling, job skills and readiness training, and academic enrichment. Programs that were designed to foster self-esteem in young unemployed fathers, employment opportunities for older adults, exploration of careers in the areas of technology and automotive repair, and the development of leadership skills among youth are also documented. Records include funding proposals, grants and contracts, correspondence, program descriptions, meeting minutes, strategic plans, newsletters, and photographs.

The Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts collection is open for research Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., in the Northeastern University Libraries, Archives and Special Collections Department, 92 Snell Library, Boston, Massachusetts. A guide to the collection is available online at: http://www.library.neu.edu/archives/collect/findaids/m139find.htm.

August 2007

Back to Top


University Archives Receives Grant to Digitize Photographs Documenting Boston's Roxbury Neighborhood, 1950-1975

The Northeastern University Libraries, Archives and Special Collections Department has won a grant from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services through the Library Services and Technology Act administered by the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners. The $20,336 award is for a project to digitize and make available on the Web 2,265 photographs and negatives, dating from 1950-1975, from the Freedom House collection.

In 1949, Freedom House was established by African American social workers Muriel S. and Otto P. Snowden to centralize community activism in the fight for neighborhood improvement, good schools, and harmony among racial, ethnic, and religious groups in Roxbury. Early programming focused primarily on activities for children, youth, and adults that would strengthen relations between the African American and Jewish residents of Upper Roxbury. Among the earliest projects Freedom House undertook was an application preparation workshop in collaboration with the American Friends Service Committee to help minority students and recent graduates apply for jobs. One of the few interracial pre-schools in the city at the time operated out of Freedom House, and throughout the 1950s, social programs for African American and Jewish teenagers focused on fostering brotherhood and good citizenship. Lectures at the popular Coffee Hours and Teas, and Sunday-at-8 forums covered a variety of current political, cultural, and social topics, including the civil rights movement. Speakers included Bayard Rustin (architect of the 1963 March on Washington), Louis Lomax (social critic and author), and representatives from the Freedom Riders and the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

The images to be digitized document early activities to create an integrated Roxbury, citizen participation in the urban renewal of Roxbury, and early oversight of Boston Public Schools desegregation. The photographs include images of well-known figures (including Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., Senator Edward M. Brooke, Senator John F. Kennedy, Jacqueline Kennedy, Robert Kennedy, Senator Edward Kennedy, Sammy Davis, Jr., Kitty Dukakis, and Boston mayors John B. Hynes, John F. Collins and Kevin H. White), local community activists (including Melnea Cass, Ellen Jackson, Herbert Tucker, and Hyman Kaplan), Freedom House events (including the Ebony Fashion Fair, anniversary celebrations, Coffee Hours and International Teas, playschool, youth group activities, and Citizens' Urban Renewal Action Committee meetings), and the Roxbury neighborhood (including images of individual buildings, the Roxbury Garden Project, Pilot House, Marksdale Gardens, Camfield Gardens, Trotter School, and the Roxbury YMCA).

This project continues Northeastern University Libraries' dedication to preserving and making accessible the history of Boston's African American community. View a list of special collections available for research in the NU Archives and Special Collections Department.

July 2007

Back to Top


Sociedad Latina Historical Records Available for Research

Northeastern University Libraries is pleased to announce that the historical records of Sociedad Latina are open for research. The collection, which was processed with funding from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, contributes to the University Archives and Special Collection Department's collecting focus on records of private, non-profit, community-based organizations that are concerned with social justice issues. For a list of the Department's special collections, see: http://www.lib.neu.edu/archives/collections/manuscript_collections/.

Sociedad Latina de South Boston was founded in 1968 by Jorge Rivera, David Rideout, John Carroll, and Lynn Minna to promote cultural, social, and recreational activities of the small Latino population in the South Boston neighborhood. Volunteers coordinated baseball, basketball, and volleyball leagues, which were sponsored by local businesses and community residents. In 1981, the organization changed its name to Sociedad Latina and moved to Tremont Street in the Mission Hill neighborhood. Since its inception, Sociedad Latina has worked with Latino youth to promote self-sufficiency, community leadership, and advancement. The collection documents the efforts of Sociedad Latina to strengthen, educate, and empower youth of all ethnicities living in the Mission Hill, Roxbury, Dorchester, and Jamaica Plain neighborhoods of Boston. Records date from 1968-2007 and document topics such as AIDS awareness and prevention, substance abuse prevention and treatment, and domestic violence prevention, pregnancy prevention, peer leader training, and tobacco use and its effects. The types of material found in this collection include proposals, grants and contracts, correspondence, program descriptions, meeting minutes, and strategic and progress reports.

The Sociedad Latina collection is open for research Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., in the Northeastern University Libraries, Archives and Special Collections Department, 92 Snell Library, Boston, Massachusetts. A guide to the collection is available online at: http://www.library.neu.edu/archives/collect/findaids/m136find.htm.

July 2007

Back to Top


Citywide Educational Coalition Records Available for Research

Northeastern University Libraries is pleased to announce that the historical records of the Citywide Educational Coalition are now open for research. The collection was processed with funding from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, and it contributes to the University Archives and Special Collection Department's collecting focus on records of private, non-profit, community-based organizations that are concerned with social justice issues. View a list of special collections available for research in the NU Archives and Special Collections Department.

The Citywide Educational Coalition, a grassroots educational reform organization located in Boston, Massachusetts, was formed in 1972 by Mary Ellen Smith, Hubert Jones, Francis Parkman, Clyde Miller, and other citizens, parents, and community activists to choose a superintendent of the Boston Public Schools. The Coalition incorporated in 1973 with the mission to provide Boston's citizens with clear and accurate information and organizing skills to participate in the making of educational policy. Between 1974 and 1978, Coalition staff actively participated in desegregating Boston's public schools by disseminating accurate information to parents through both the Rumor Control Center and its publications. From the 1980s until the Coalition disbanded in 2000, it continued to advocate for school reform by working with teachers and parent groups, monitoring School Committee meetings, and publishing newsletters, fact sheets, and reports on issues, such as the Boston Public School's budget, teacher contracts, principal and headmaster promotional ratings, and the physical condition of the schools.

The 30 cubic feet of records illuminate the Coalition's role in the desegregation of the Boston Public Schools and its efforts to disseminate the policies and practices of the Boston School Committee and the Boston Public Schools in language that parents could understand. Topics documented include the response of the anti-busing community to Judge W. Arthur Garrity's orders and the Coalition's collaboration with three court appointed councils. Also documented are meetings of the Boston School Committee and its standing committees, negotiations with the Boston Teacher's Union, and programs offered in the Boston Public Schools. In addition, parent participation in education; school assignment and student choice; vocational, special, and early childhood education; community and parent organizing; and parent training projects are also documented.

The Citywide Educational Coalition collection is open for research Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., in the Northeastern University Libraries Archives and Special Collections Department, 92 Snell Library, Boston, Massachusetts. A guide to the collection is available online at http://www.library.neu.edu/archives/collect/findaids/m130find.htm.

June 2007

Back to Top


New Acquisitions: Criminal Justice and Discharged Prisoner Services Collections

Northeastern University Libraries is pleased to announce the acquisition of the historical records of Community Resources for Justice and its predecessor organizations, the Massachusetts Correctional Association, Crime and Justice Foundation, and Massachusetts Half-Way Houses. These rich collections document prison reform and social services to former inmates in Massachusetts, and they contribute to the University Archives and Special Collection Department's collecting focus on the records of private, non-profit, community-based organizations that are concerned with social justice issues. For a list of the Department's special collections, see: Boston History Collections.

In 1940, the United Prison Association of Massachusetts was formed to provide social services for discharged prisoners, to legislate for a more effective state correctional system, and to disseminate information on correctional matters. The organization changed its name in 1967 to the Massachusetts Correctional Association when the term "correctional" became favored over "prison". In 1975, due to the proliferation of social service agencies founded during the nation's War on Poverty and the lessened availability of funding, the Massachusetts Correctional Association merged with the Massachusetts Council on Crime and Correction. The resulting agency was named the Crime and Justice Foundation. Its mission was to prevent crime and to enhance the quality of justice in Massachusetts by developing public understanding of issues in the administration of criminal justice and the need for action geared toward their improvement. Almost 25 years later in 1999, the Crime and Justice Foundation merged with Massachusetts Half-Way Houses, which had been founded in 1964 to provide rehabilitative facilities and services to former criminal offenders, to form Community Resources for Justice. The mission of this new organization is to promote a safe and just society for all people through direct care programs. Community Resources for Justice advocates for system improvement, conducts research, and publishes the results. It works with individuals in, or at risk of being in, the adult or juvenile justice systems; individuals transitioning out of these systems back to their communities; and individuals with developmental disabilities requiring intensive support to be part of the community.

The material, dating from 1939-2002, documents the predecessor organizations of Community Resources for Justice in addition to its current programs: adult correctional services (residential and non-residential services to adults who are currently involved or have been involved with Federal, State and County correctional systems, and Parole and Probation agencies), youth services (serving at-risk and delinquent youth with counseling, treatment and education), community strategies (providing individuals with mental illness or mental retardation, severe psychiatric or developmental disabilities, or complex medical needs with specialized services), and the Crime and Justice Institute (improving public safety and human service delivery with creative, collaborative approaches to today's most pressing and complex social and public safety problems). The records include bylaws, correspondence, board and committee minutes, annual reports, research reports, contracts, annual budgets and audits, county correctional plans, and policy manuals.

May 2007

Back to Top


United South End Settlements Records Available for Research

The historical records of United South End Settlements are now open for research. The collection was processed with funding from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, and it contributes to the University Archives and Special Collection Department's collecting focus on records of private, non-profit, community-based organizations that are concerned with social justice issues. For a list of the Department's special collections, see: Boston History Collections.

United South End Settlements (USES) is a non-profit social service agency located in the South End of Boston, Massachusetts. USES' programs and services have included residential and day camps for boys and girls, day care and after school programs, counseling and referrals for new immigrants, career counseling and employment training, assisting minorities with small business startup, crime-prevention, affordable housing and tenant rights education, and urban renewal planning, as well as a community center and art gallery. USES was formed in January, 1960 when members of the Federation of South End Settlements (Children's Art Center and South End, Lincoln, Hale, and Harriet Tubman houses) incorporated into the United South End Settlements.

Records dating from 1960-2006 document United South End Settlement's efforts to provide safe, accessible spaces where residents of the South End and Lower Roxbury gathered for recreational, cultural, and educational activities. United South End settlements' role in urban renewal, particularly in the Castle Square area, and in developing economic opportunities during the 1960s and 1970s is also documented. In addition, oral histories of several residents describing the history and culture of the South End from the 1920s-1990s and the role of the settlement houses are also included, as well as an extensive collection of images that document the South end neighborhood from 1900-1990s. The collection also includes records dating from 1891-1961 regarding the history of United South End Settlements prior to its incorporation, specifically the formation of the Federation of South End Settlements and the creation of the Children's Art Centre.

The United South End Settlements collection is open for research Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., in the Northeastern University Libraries Archives and Special Collections Department, 92 Snell Library, Boston, Massachusetts. A guide to the collection is available online at http://www.lib.neu.edu/archives/collect/findaids/m126find.htm.

March 2007

Back to Top


Women's Organizations Collections Available for Research

Northeastern University Libraries announces the historical records of four Boston area women's organizations are open for research. The collections were recently donated to the Archives and Special Collections Department by The Women's Center in Cambridge, MA.

The Women's Coffeehouse began in October 1979 when a small group of women from the Women's Educational Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts met to discuss plans to open a Coffeehouse operated by and for women. They felt that women of all ages, nationalities, body types, economic status, and disabilities lacked a space to safely enjoy cultural activities together. The objective of the Women's Coffeehouse was to provide "an active, participative, grass roots environment" for local women to develop their own community despite their personal political affiliations. Weekly performances were intended to spark discourse among women in the community about their shared issues and concerns. The collection documents the organization and activities of the Women's Coffeehouse and contains meeting minutes, photos, fliers, and audiotapes of performances and press releases. A guide to the collection is available online at http://www.library.neu.edu/archives/collect/findaids/m120find.htm.

The Boston Area Feminist Coalition was founded in the summer of 1981 by Nancy Wheeler, Diane Raymond, Sara Freedman and Pam Chamberlain to provide a forum for local feminist groups to collectively address issues that all women faced. The group originally had four goals: to build unity among feminists, to organize successfully against the New Right, to build a network to more effectively communicate with each other, and to create a political discourse that acknowledged the differences among women, such as race, class and sexual orientation. The records of the Boston Area Feminist Coalition document the group's efforts to organize women and feminist groups through workshops, retreats, forums, meetings and protests in Boston during 1981-1983. The collection contains meeting minutes and agendas, press releases, correspondence, proposals, member lists, fliers, and a scrapbook documenting the work of the Coalition through meeting notes, attendance records, fliers, and statements. A guide to the collection is available online at http://www.library.neu.edu/archives/collect/findaids/m121find.htm.

Female Liberation was a radical feminist organization seeking to confront issues, such as self-defense, equal wages, birth control, consumerism, and the media's portrayal of women. To meet these goals, they published weekly newsletters and a journal of women's poetry and essays, held public meetings and classes, and protested perceived injustices. Its goal was to create a unified community that worked for and supported women's issues in the Boston area. This collection documents the work of Female Liberation and the internal conflict that hindered the group's ability to develop a unified political strategy. In addition, the records offer insight into the many complex issues that surrounded the Boston feminist movement at its conception, including the difficulty in maintaining a harmonious ideology among different groups within the Women's Movement. This collection contains newsletters of Female Liberation and other feminist groups, position papers, statements, correspondence, legal documents, fliers, press releases, and copies of No More Fun and Games: A Journal of Female Liberation. A guide to the collection is available online at http://www.library.neu.edu/archives/collect/findaids/M122find.htm.

Sister Courage was an all female, volunteer, and collective newspaper dedicated to providing a forum where women could contribute their experiences and ideas while developing feminist theory. This non-profit feminist newspaper was founded in 1974 by 40 women to address issues such as health, day care, housing, union organization, and employment. The goals of the newspaper were to improve communication among Boston area women's groups, develop feminist theory and strategy, and analyze the way capitalism and sexism reinforced each other. The collection documents the work of Sister Courage, feminist theory, and volunteer and collective business practices. It includes legal documents; correspondence; newsletters; meeting minutes; and copies of the Sister Courage publication (1975-1978). A guide to the collection is available online at http://www.library.neu.edu/archives/collect/findaids/M123find.htm.

The collections are open for research Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., in the Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections Department, 92 Snell Library, Boston, Massachusetts, http://www.neu.edu/libraryarchives/. The collections contribute to the University Archives and Special Collection Department's collecting focus on records of private, non-profit, community-based organizations that are concerned with social justice issues. View a list of special collections available for research in the NU Archives and Special Collections Department.

February 2007

Back to Top


International Society Centers Records Open for Research

Northeastern University Libraries is pleased to announce that the historical records of the International Society have been organized, and a guide to the collection is available online at http://www.lib.neu.edu/archives/collect/findaids/m128find.htm.

The International Society grew out of the Chinese Economic Development Council in 1979. Formerly known as the Center for Chinese Art and Culture (1979), the China Institute (1980), and the Chinese Culture Institute (1981), the Society's original goal was to support Chinese culture and heritage among Boston's Chinese community, and to promote the City's understanding of that culture. In 2000, the organization's name changed to the International Society, and its mission shifted to promoting understanding of cultural differences through multicultural arts programming.

The 2.5 cubic feet of material document the cultural events produced by the Society, as well as its daily activities. The Society organized festivals, lectures, workshops, and a summer camp, and sponsored artists and musicians, including Yo Yo Ma. The collection contains promotional literature about these events, such as press releases, posters, flyers and mailings, exhibit catalogs, postcards, and calendars of events. Also documented are the programs of the Society's art gallery, theatre, and music and dance ensemble. The collection also contains the administrative records of Dr. Doris Chu, president of the society. Records are in both English and Chinese.

The collection is open for research Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., in the Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections Department, 92 Snell Library, Boston, Massachusetts, http://www.neu.edu/libraryarchives/. The collection contributes to the University Archives and Special Collection Department's collecting focus on records of private, non-profit, community-based organizations that are concerned with social justice issues. View a list of the Department's special collections here.

November 2006

Back to Top


Escuelita Agüeybana Day Care Centers Records Open for Research

Northeastern University Libraries is pleased to announce that the historical records of Escuelita Agüeybana Day Care Centers (Escuelita) have been organized, and a guide to the collection is available online at http://www.lib.neu.edu/archives/collect/findaids/m116find.htm.

In 1976 in Boston's South End, a group of parents living in Villa Victoria--a community development that combines housing, commercial space and social services, and is a model of community empowerment and neighborhood preservation--met to discuss their need for day care. These parents, who were in the process of becoming economically self-sufficient, worked together to establish Escuelita Agüeybana, the first bilingual day care center in Massachusetts to serve primarily Hispanic children and their families. The center, which opened its doors in 1978, was funded by the City of Boston Public Welfare Department, and Inquilinos Boricuas en Accion (IBA) acted as its fiscal agent. Escuelita was a Head Start program, a national program that provided comprehensive educational services to low income preschool children and their families. Incorporated in 1981, Escuelita opened another center in Dorchester, Massachusetts in 1985. Throughout the 1990s, Escuelita experienced a succession of interim directors and compliance violations from funding agencies. As a result, Escuelita began discussing the possibility of merging with IBA; however, the loss of funding and the inability to hire a permanent executive director caused the both centers to close in 1996 before the merger could be completed.

The 5 cubic feet of material dates from 1978 through 1996 and covers research topics, such as bilingual and multicultural education, Head Start programs, Hispanic American child day care, and child nutrition and health. The records specifically document the centers' curriculum development, services for children and families, parental involvement in establishing center policies, and efforts to comply with federal and state child day care regulations. The records are in English with some Spanish interspersed.

The collection is open for research Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., in the Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections Department, 92 Snell Library, Boston, Massachusetts, http://www.neu.edu/libraryarchives/. The collection was processed with funding from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, and it contributes to the University Archives and Special Collection Department's collecting focus on records of private, non-profit, community-based organizations that are concerned with social justice issues. View a list of the Department's special collections here.

July 2006

Back to Top


Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción Records Open for Research

Northeastern University Libraries is pleased to announce that the historical records of Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción (IBA) have been organized, and a guide to the collection is available online at http://www.lib.neu.edu/archives/collect/findaids/m111find.htm. The collection was processed with funding from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, and it contributes to the University Archives and Special Collection Department's collecting focus on records of private, non-profit, community-based organizations that are concerned with social justice issues. For a list of the Department's special collections, see: Boston History Collections

Located in Boston's South End neighborhood, IBA is a community development corporation which began in 1967 as a grassroots movement against the Boston Redevelopment Authority's urban renewal plan. IBA incorporated in 1968 as the Emergency Tenant's Council of Parcel 19, Inc. (ETC) and successfully designed its own housing development plan. In 1969, the Boston Housing Authority named ETC sponsor-developer of Parcel 19. ETC formally changed its name to IBA in 1974, and Parcel 19 was renamed Villa Victoria by residents in 1976. Villa Victoria-- a community development that combines housing, commercial space and social services, and is a model of community empowerment and neighborhood preservation--is made up of 435 housing units, including elderly housing and a special needs residence.

The 49 cubic feet of material documents Inquilinos IBA's efforts to empower residents of the Villa Victoria community by providing affordable housing and creating opportunities that allowed them to have greater control over it. The records date from 1967 to 2004 and cover research topics, such as urban renewal and housing rehabilitation, tenant associations, Puerto Rican social conditions, non-profit social service delivery, and community development. Other topics include ethnic identity through cultural education and awareness, Latino performing arts, services to the elderly, youth leadership skills, and substance abuse prevention. Records are in both English and Spanish.

The collection is open for research Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., in the Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections Department, 92 Snell Library, Boston, Massachusetts.

July 2006

Back to Top


Roxbury Multi-Service Center Records Open for Research

Northeastern University Libraries is pleased to announce the completed processing of the historical records of Roxbury Multi-Service Center (RMSC). The collection was processed with funding from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, and it contributes to the University Archives and Special Collection Department's collecting focus on records of private, non-profit, community-based organizations that are concerned with social justice issues. For a list of the Department's special collections, see: Boston History Collections

RMSC is a "one stop" social service agency that was modeled after19th century settlement houses where all client services were located under one roof. The programs documented in this collection include psychological assessment and counseling, youth development, housing and community development, sexual assault awareness and prevention, crime prevention, academic enrichment, urban beautification, gang prevention, career development, and employment counseling and training.

The 29 cubic feet of material dates from 1965 to 2002 and documents RMSC's efforts to make Roxbury an economically viable community and to provide social and mental health programs and services to neighborhood residents. The collection also documents RMSC's community and political activism and its role in creating the Task Force on Children out of School, monitoring school desegregation, and developing La Alianza Hispana. Included in the collection are the records of executive directors and Board of Directors; correspondence, reports, and meeting minutes; grant proposals and contracts; newsletters; program descriptions, reports and statistics; and photographs, audio cassettes and memorabilia. For access to Roxbury Multi-Service Center's finding aid, see: http://www.lib.neu.edu/archives/collect/findaids/m109find.htm.

The collection is open for research Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:00, in the Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections, 92 Snell Library, Boston, Massachusetts.

November 2005

Back to Top


National Grant Received to Organize Six Collections from Boston's Underrepresented Communities

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission has awarded Northeastern University Libraries, Archives and Special Collections Department $175,000 for its two-year project, Processing and Providing Access to Boston African American and Latino History. Support for the first year ($90,000) is guaranteed; the remainder of the award is pending NHPRC funding.

The purpose of the project is to make six historically important manuscript collections accessible for research. The Archives and Special Collections Department will arrange, describe, and make accessible 436 cubic feet of mainly 20th century historical records from six private, non-profit organizations relating to social justice in the African American and Latino communities in Boston.

The organizations are: Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción (IBA), United South End Settlements (USES), Roxbury Multi-Service Center (RMSC), Sociedad Latina, Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts (ULEM) and The Citywide Educational Coalition. When considered with the other African American and Latino collections already available in Northeastern's Archives, the body of material will comprise an invaluable historical resource.

The records of these organizations contain rich documentation of themes relating to school desegregation, public policy formation, public health issues, community relations, affordable housing, urban planning, social service delivery, cultural programming, violence prevention, and minority rights during the last decades of the 20th century. The records provide perspectives different from the information and opinions presented by conventional media and in the traditional historical documentation. Created by members of the African American and Latino communities, the records provide clues for understanding events that may have been ignored, misunderstood, or misrepresented in traditional sources. On both the local and national levels, this project will enhance research on a wide range of themes relating to the African American and Latino struggles for full inclusion into society.

For a list of the special collections that are available for research, with links to online finding aids, see: Boston History Collections.

This project demonstrates the Northeastern University Libraries' dedication to preserving the history of Boston's African American, Asian American, Latino, and gay and lesbian communities through preserving the historical records of Boston social justice organizations. View a list of special collections available for research in the NU Archives and Special Collections Department.

July 2005

Back to Top


Funding for Exhibit on African American Activism at NU

Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections Department and the Department of African-American Studies are pleased to announce the receipt of a grant from Northeastern's Office of Affirmative Action and Diversity to fund the creation of a permanent, online, multi-media exhibit concerning the history of African American activism on campus in the late 1960s through the 1970s. Michelle Light, Assistant Archivist, Robert L. Hall, Associate Professor of African American Studies and History, and Joan D. Krizack, University Archivist and Head, Special Collections Department, will collaborate on this project.

This exhibit will enhance the understanding of the evolution of diversity on Northeastern's campus and promote respect for the university's tradition of seeking social justice; it will tell the story of how African Americans achieved a more diverse and equitable academic and social environment; and it will highlight selected historical records that best document the many voices, concerns, and innovations of the Northeastern University community. The exhibit will include photographs, newspaper articles, correspondence, memoranda, video clips, and petitions relating to events and programs such as the 1968 black student protests and the founding of, the African-American Institute, The Onyx, and the Department of African-American Studies.

Northeastern currently lacks a written history of its quest for a more diverse campus; by compiling a history of the earliest attempts to achieve diversity on campus, accompanied by visual images and access to the primary sources, Northeastern can tell its story to the university, the local community, and the world beyond.

The exhibit will be modeled on other exhibits that the Archives has completed, for example, We Raise Our Voices and A Proud Past: Boston Bouvé College, 1913-1977. The goal is for all who view this exhibit to gain a better understanding of the history of the development of the university's mission for a diverse campus, and develop a greater respect for past and present efforts to achieve social justice.

When the exhibit is complete, the University Library plans to hold an event, both to introduce it to Northeastern students, faculty, staff and members of the local community, and to provide a forum for discussing issues surrounding the creation of a more inclusive society. The event will also promote the Archives' collections (over 40) relating to African American, Latino, and gay and lesbian social justice organizations in the Boston area. View a list of special collections available for research in the NU Archives and Special Collections Department.

August 2004

Back to Top


New Acquisition: Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston Records

Northeastern University Libraries is pleased to announce the acquisition of the historical records of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston. This material contributes to the University Archives and Special Collection Department's collecting focus on records of private, non-profit, community-based organizations that are concerned with social justice issues. For a list of the Department's special collections, see Boston History Collections.

Founded in Charlestown in 1893 as the Boy's Club of Boston, the Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston currently serves 8,000 urban youths, largely from disadvantaged circumstances, in its five clubhouses in Charlestown, Chelsea, Dorchester, Roxbury and South Boston. The Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston aids in the development of youth, ages 6 to 18, through programs in six core areas: the arts; education; leadership and character development; life skills; sports, fitness and recreation; and technology. The program activities and support services are designed to assist in the overall educational, emotional, physical and social development of participants, without regard to social, racial, ethnic, or religious background. Extensive community partnerships, such as those with the Boston Police Department and the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, expand the opportunities available to Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston members, while trained youth development professionals act daily as mentors and role models. Volunteers provide key supplementary support to the organization.

The material acquired dates from 1910 to 2000 and documents the Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston's efforts to provide a community in which youth can realize their full potential. The collection includes records of the executive directors, board and committee minutes, fund raising and development material, publications and reports, photographs, and scrapbooks. The collection also includes material pertaining to the Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston's parent organization, The Boys and Girls Clubs of America.

August 2004

Back to Top


NU Libraries Acquires Boston Persistent Poverty Project Records

Northeastern University Libraries is pleased to announce the acquisition of the historical records of The Boston Foundation's Boston Persistent Poverty Project. This material contributes to the University Archives and Special Collection Department's collecting focus on the records of private, non-profit, community-based organizations that are concerned with social justice issues. View a list of all collections available for research in the NU Archives and Special Collections Department.

Begun in the early 1980s, the Boston Persistent Poverty Project is a broad-based, collaborative campaign to eradicate chronic, intergenerational poverty in Boston. The Project's goal is to create a new social contract that recognizes and honors the reciprocal rights, responsibilities and interdependence of all members of our community, and to build and sustain commitment to a process of change.

The Project works to provide a framework for the new skills, leadership, and relationships required to eradicate persistent poverty in Boston. In the 1980s, the Project conducted the first comprehensive survey of poverty in Boston. During the next decade, the Project held community roundtables and focus groups that helped participants understand the ways in which poverty affects the many diverse communities of which Boston is comprised. In addition the Project's research and publishing initiative has provided outstanding documentation of poverty and related issues in Boston.

The material, dating from about 1972-2001, includes the publications and records of the Boston Persistent Poverty Project; records of the Boston Community Building Network, an outgrowth of the Boston Persistent Poverty Project; The Boston Foundation annual reports and newsletters; and speeches of Anna Faith Jones, who was president of The Boston Foundation, 1984-2001. The Boston Foundation, established in 1915 as Greater Boston's community foundation, holds 750 charitable funds established by donors for the benefit of the community. The Foundation fosters active philanthropy, connecting donors to nonprofit organizations working to improve the lives of the residents of Greater Boston. It also serves as a civic leader, convener, and sponsor of special initiatives.

June 5, 2003

Back to Top


NU Libraries Acquires the Historical Records of United South End Settlements

Northeastern University Libraries is pleased to announce the acquisition of the historical records of United South End Settlements. This material contributes to the University Archives and Special Collection Department's collecting focus on the records of private, non-profit, community-based organizations that are concerned with social justice issues and that serve the African American, Chinese, Latino, or gay and lesbian communities.

United South End Settlements was founded in 1960 as the merger of four settlement houses—South End House, Lincoln House, Hale House, Harriet Tubman House— and the Children's Art Centre, all which had been founded in the 1890s. Settlement houses were tied to low-income neighborhoods, and their goal was to provide educational and recreational services and to bring about social reform. Early settlement workers lived in these houses to develop a friendly relationship with the neighbors whom they sought to help. Thus the name "settlement houses" refers to individuals from outside of the neighborhood residing or "settling" in the agency; these outsiders later became know as "social workers." United South End Settlements serves individuals of all ages by offering, for example, art classes, GED examination preparation, computer access and training, pre-school and after-school programs, adult literacy classes, and chess clubs.

The material, dating from 1892-2000 documents United South End Settlements' predecessor organizations in addition to current programs in art, education, technology, and social services, which serve individuals of all ages. The records include correspondence, board and committee minutes, reports, photographs, contracts, annual budgets, and newspaper clippings.

January 2003

Back to Top


Northeastern University to Preserve the Historical Records of Positive Directions, Inc.

Northeastern University Libraries is pleased to announce the acquisition of the historical records of Positive Directions, Inc. This material contributes to the University Archives and Special Collection Department's collecting focus on the records of private, non-profit, community-based organizations that are concerned with social justice issues and that serve the African American, Chinese, Latino, or gay and lesbian communities.

Positive Directions, Inc. was founded in 1987 to improve the quality of life and longevity for people living with HIV/AIDS. Staff and volunteers of the grassroots organization provided information, counseling, employment assistance, advocacy, and access to community resources for individuals with HIV or those directly affected by HIV. In addition, the organization actively monitored advances in medical treatment for HIV/AIDS. In 1996, Northern Lights Alternatives, which was founded in 1989 to improve the emotional, spiritual, and physical well-being of people affected by HIV/AIDS, merged with Positive Directions to from one organization.

The material acquired dates from the organization's inception in 1987 to its closing in 2002 and documents both the Positive Direction's programs and the state of HIV/AIDS treatment and advocacy in Massachusetts. The collection complements the records of AIDS Action Committee of Boston, Inc., which are also preserved at Northeastern University, and includes correspondence, board minutes, reports, photographs, video tapes, contracts, annual budgets, and newsletters among other types of material.

January 2003

Back to Top


Northeastern University to Preserve the Historical Records of the Boston Society of Vulcans of Massachusetts

Northeastern University Libraries is pleased to announce the acquisition of the historical records of the Boston Society of Vulcans of Massachusetts.

Founded in 1969, the Boston Society of Vulcans was formed mainly to recruit African American and other minorities to the fire service and to ensure the promotion of minorities from within the ranks. At that time, the Boston Fire Department employed 2100 fire fighters, 18 of whom were black and one was Hispanic; the Commonwealth of Massachusetts employed 10,000 fire fighters, only 38 of whom were black. In 1972 the Society, with assistance from the NAACP, Attorney Thomas Mela, and the Justice Department, filed a class action suit against the Civil Service Commission, which resulted in the City of Boston having to hire minorities on a one-to-one basis until people of color represented 26% of the fire fighting force. In 1976 the first class was appointed under the court order, and all appointees were black. The Vulcans also engage in charitable activities, including running a smoke detector program, donating funds to those in need, establishing the Lloyd Phillips Scholarship fund to assist student in the community meet college costs, sponsoring Thanksgiving dinners for senior citizens, and donating food baskets at Christmas.

The collection documents the Vulcans' efforts to increase the number of minority fire fighters in the Boston Fire Department, their fund-raising efforts for community organizations, and their support of minority fire fighters facing legal action. The records include correspondence, memoranda, board minutes, and newspaper clippings. The collection also documents, to a lesser extent, the International Association of Black Professional Fire Fighters and the North East Region of the IABPFF.

June 27, 2002

Back to Top


Northeastern University to Preserve the Historical Records of Inquilinos Boricuas en Accion (IBA)

As part of an ongoing initiative to ensure that the history of Boston's Latino community is available for the future, Northeastern University Library's Archives and Special Collections Department has reached a formal agreement with Inquilinos Boricuas en Accion (IBA) to preserve the organization's historical materials.

IBA was founded in 1968 by the mainly Puerto Rican residents of Parcel 19 who were threatened by Boston's urban renewal program. The residents lobbied for the right to control the redevelopment process of their community, which resulted in the creation of Villa Victoria, a 895-unit low to moderate income neighborhood. Today, IBA fosters the well being of Villa Victoria residents, advocates for Latinos throughout the city, and perpetuates the rich Latino cultural and artistic heritage.

At Northeastern, the historical records of IBA will be preserved so that educators, students, historians, journalists, television and film producers, and members of the general public can use them to develop curricula, to write papers, articles, and books, to research television and film productions, and to satisfy their curiosity. The records illuminate topics such as the history of urban renewal, community development, affordable housing, and Latino traditions and culture in Boston.

Back to Top