EXCERPTS , page 2
By David Marshall

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"There is a popular sense that contemporary culture has an overload of information that is counterproductive at both the individual and society level. The Internet's burgeoning supply of information has often become the current shorthand for this information overload. Part of the problem is that it is difficult to determine the relative value of any piece of information and there seems to be fewer means to check the validity of the facts, figures and arguments that are produced on the Web. In other words, the Web produces a massive surplus of content that may not actually be useable as information. When we use the Web, one of the principal frustrations is getting to a source that may advertise itself through a keyword that in the end has used that word purely to attract web traffic via the search engines. If one of the advantages/values of the current web is its connection to "information", we need to think through what information actually is and, from that vantage point, we can assess the kinds of information that are produced by the Internet and its elaborate Web of content."

from Web Theory By Robert Burnett and P. David Marshall ( London and New York : Routledge, 2003) ch. 2

"Information and communication technology shapes our perceptions, distributes our pictures of the world to one another, and constructs different forms of control over the cultural stories that shape our sense of who we are and our world. The instant we develop a new technology of communication talking drums, papyrus scrolls, books, telegraph, radios, televisions, computers, mobile phones we at least partially reconstruct the self and its world, creating new opportunities for reflection, perception, and social experience..."

from Web Theory By Robert Burnett and P. David Marshall ( London and New York : Routledge, 2003) ch. 4