2
Jul15

Digital Repository Service (DRS) replaces IRis for storage and sharing of NU-created materials

Posted by: Sarah Sweeney

Gravatar

After several months of preparation, the library has now successfully transitioned from IRis, our previous repository platform, to the newly redesigned Digital Repository Service (DRS).

IRis was publicly launched in 2006, and attained a milestone of 1 million downloads in 2013. The DRS builds upon the success of IRis by offering expanded functionality and customization specific to community needs.

Like IRis, the DRS is a storage and preservation tool designed to allow the Northeastern University community to store materials that are produced at the University or are important to the university’s mission. Faculty are welcome to upload their research materials, publications, datasets, and presentations; staff can store important administrative materials, like departmental photographs and documents. As in IRis, the library deposits all master’s theses and doctoral dissertations completed at the University into the DRS. Exemplary undergraduate student projects and publications are also included in the DRS.

DRS features include:

Self deposit: Faculty members may deposit their own material.

Simple discovery: The locally developed interface offers user-friendly searching and browsing.

Saving and downloading: Materials can be saved to Sets or downloaded for future use.

Easy account creation: Users may sign in to the DRS with their myNEU username and password.

As of today the DRS has over 70,000 files stored, and more than half of those files are available to the public:

  • 1,677 master’s theses and doctoral dissertations completed at Northeastern University since 2008

  • 1,217 publications authored by Northeastern University faculty and staff

  • 16 archival collections from University Archives and Special Collections, including photographs from the Boys and Girls Club and Freedom House collections

  • 25,000 photographs from Northeastern University’s Office of Marketing and Communications (faculty and staff access only)

  • And growing…

We encourage everyone to visit the DRS to view the impressive collection of material produced by Northeastern University faculty, staff, and students. Faculty and staff are invited to start uploading their materials right away. For more information about the DRS, or for help getting started uploading your files, please visit our DRS resource page: http://dsg.neu.edu/resources/drs.

Posted in: Scholarly Communications, Tech Alerts

22
Jun15

Your Ebrary Bookshelf and Single Sign On

Posted by: Emily Nehme

Gravatar

Are you an Ebrary user? (We hope so.) If you are, accessing your Ebrary bookshelf is going to get a whole lot easier! On July 2nd, Snell Library is switching over to Single Sign On (SSO) authentication. That means that you’ll be signed directly into your account when entering your myNEU username and password.

The transition to SSO authentication means that the books you have read will no longer be visible. If you would like to transfer your current Ebrary bookshelf to your new account, please follow the instructions on the library website. If you don’t have an Ebrary bookshelf, feel free to set one up after July 2nd, 2015. Browse the vast online collection of books, journals, articles, and more through Scholar OneSearch. Once selecting an e-book or e-journal, you can sign into Ebrary and keep track of all your favorite reads!

 

Add any e-book to your Ebrary bookshelf with just one click!

 

Posted in: Serendipity

11
Jun15

Summer Reading Suggestions

Posted by: Emily Nehme

Gravatar

Now’s the time to start tackling your summer reading list! Whether you’re staying in town or going on an elaborate trip, you’re bound to have some down time. Why not spend that time taking advantage of Snell Library’s thousands of available books, e-books, journals, and more!

Snell Library staff have suggested some of their favorites to get you started:

 

The Darkest Minds
By Alexandra Bracken

Recommended by Ernesto Valencia

“When Ruby woke up on her tenth birthday, something about her had changed. Something alarming enough to make her parents lock her in the garage and call the police. Something that gets her sent to Thurmond, a brutal government “rehabilitation camp.” She might have survived the mysterious disease that’s killed most of America’s children, but she and the others have emerged with something far worse: frightening abilities they cannot control.”

 

 

 

Feynman
By Jim Ottaviani and Leyland Myrick

Recommended by Sarah Sweeney

“This is a lovely and fascinating graphic novel that illustrates bits and pieces of various works by Richard Feynman, the famous physicist.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wonder
By R.J. Palacio

Recommended by Jen Ferguson

“This New York Times bestseller, available in Snell Library’s Favat Children’s Collection, tells the story of Auggie, an ordinary boy with an extraordinary face. Told skillfully from Auggie’s point of view as well as the perspectives of others in his life, this fast read will transport you back to the glories and agonies of childhood.”

 

 

 

 

 

Bagombo Snuff Box
By Kurt Vonnegut

Recommended by Mark Sivak

“If people are looking for a good book for a plane ride, I recommend Bagombo Snuff Box, which is a collection of short fiction by Kurt Vonnegut.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
By Carson McCullers

Recommended by Molly Dupere

“Set in Georgia in the 1930s,  The Heart is a Lonely Hunter follows four residents of a small town, each a loner and all struggling with feeling misunderstood within the confines of their lives. Independently, the four seek the company of another local, a def-mute who is himself an enigma in the town, but upon whom each character projects what they want him to be – a sounding board for what’s going on in their heads, often to heart-breaking effect. The plot is both simple and complex, and a must-read for any fan of Southern Gothic literature.”

 

 

Not what you’re looking for? Browse our collections online using Scholar OneSearch to find your new favorite read!

 

 

Posted in: Serendipity

27
May15

Keep track of your BLC books!

Posted by: G. Karen Merguerian

Gravatar

Are you one of the thousands of Northeastern students and researchers who borrow books using interlibrary loan through the BLC (Boston Library Consortium) partnership program?

If so, this is a heads up that beginning June 1, BLC books are subject to overdue fines.

These books and DVD’s are the ones with the white bands wrapped around the cover saying “Boston Library Consortium.”

 

This means books, CDs, and DVDs that you borrow from our partner libraries in the BLC will now be subject to the same fines as Northeastern books.  (You can look up the fine information on our web site.)

Why are we doing this?  Because it’s important for us to maintain good relationships with our partner libraries.  If we do not return books to them, they can’t serve their own populations of students and researchers.  And it can be hard for us to return items in a timely manner when we do not charge fines.

The good news is that it’s easy for you to avoid fines!   All you need to do is note on your calendar when your books are due, and always read your email reminders from the library.  We notify you 3 days before fines begin, and we follow up with another email on the day the book is due.

You may also check your library account at any time to see what you currently have checked out and the due dates.

 

Posted in: Library News and Events

4
May15

Speeches, Posters, and the Presidency: Michael Dukakis’ 1988 Campaign

Posted by: Kristin Wright

Gravatar

In the past few weeks, the nation has had a number of politicians announce their intentions to run for the presidency. Soon the television, radio, and internet will be flooded with political advertisements, and our lawns and billboards will be plastered with the slogans and faces of the candidates. The information overload which accompanies a presidential race is not a new phenomenon. Past elections show the same intensity and fervor from the politicians and political parties. I was recently reminded of this intensity while processing Michael Aronson’s Papers (M206), for Northeastern’s Special Collections and Archives.

Michael Aronson Papers (M206), FF4/D4

The collection offers a behind the scenes look at a presidential campaign through items collected from Michael Dukakis’ presidential campaign against George H. W. Bush during 1987-1988. Michael Aronson was a member of Dukakis’ speech writing team, leaving him with numerous items from the campaign including:

• Speeches

• Speech Drafts

• Correspondence

• Campaign Posters

• Itineraries

Even though Dukakis did not win the presidency, these materials represent an impressive campaign, and demonstrate the difficulty and challenges which accompany such an endeavor. The items, particularly the posters, also represent some of the less wholesome parts of a presidential campaign. The satirical and accusatory posters are interesting pieces of cultural and political history, which demonstrate the fine line that politicians tread when running for office.

Michael Aronson Papers (M206), FF4/D4

This collection offers a great opportunity to learn about political elections in the U.S. through primary evidence, and through a behind the scenes perspective, which media coverage does not always provide.

Posted in: Archives and Special Collections