Serendipity

22
Sep16

Welcome New Library Staff

Posted by: Jennie Robbiano

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Welcome new and returning students, faculty and staff!  The library is pleased to announce new staff members to support your research, teaching, and scholarship.

 

Bopp, MelanieMelanie Bopp – Access Services Librarian Melanie Bopp comes to Northeastern from the University of New Orleans where she worked as the Head of Circulation Services.  At Northeastern Melanie oversees evening/weekend services at the Help and Information Desk, coordinates building security services, and contributes to a variety of projects and initiatives that improve your experience in Snell Library.  Melanie has a BA in English from Mount Holyoke College and an MA in Library and Information Science from Louisiana State University.  Prior to working in libraries Melanie taught English in Japan. Reach Melanie at m.bopp@northeastern.edu.

 

 

Sarah ConnellSarah Connell – Sarah Connell has joined the Women Writers Project (WWP) in a new staff role as Assistant Director, where she served previously as Project Manager.  Currently Sarah is also Assistant Director of NULab.  For the WWP, Sarah brings a wealth of experience in women’s writing, digital humanities pedagogy, text encoding, and project management.  In her new role she will focus on a recently funded “Intertextual Networks” grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Sarah completed her PhD in English at Northeastern in 2014, with a specialization in early modern Irish and British literature and digital humanities.  Reach Sarah at sa.connell@northeastern.edu.

 

Lindley HomolLindley Homol – Research and Instruction Librarian Lindley Homol comes to Northeastern from the University of Maryland where she provided teaching and research support to online and distance users.  Lindley’s work has included creating and assessing online learning objects and collaborating with faculty and university administration to identify and replace traditional textbooks with open education resources.  At Northeastern Lindley supports students and faculty in Education.

Lindley has been very active in the library profession.  She presented at recent national conferences including last spring’s Computers in Libraries conference and Catholic University’s Annual Symposium on Scholarship and Practice, and has published articles relevant to the profession for the Association of College and Research Libraries’ Keeping Up With series and the Journal of Academic Librarianship.  Lindley has a BA in English from Pennsylvania State University and an MA in Library and Information Science from the University of Pittsburgh.   Reach Lindley at l.homol@northeastern.edu.

 

Jon ReedJon Reed – Communications and Outreach Specialist Jon Reed comes to Northeastern from James Madison University where he worked as Communications Coordinator for the James Madison University Libraries.  Jon draws on solid experience working with stakeholders on a variety of communications initiatives to help promote library services and collections.  Jon has a BA in History from James Madison University.  Reach Jon at jo.reed@northeastern.edu.

 

 

ThomasNicoleSquareNicole Thomas – Access Services Librarian Nicole Thomas comes to Northeastern from Boston University’s Pardee Management Library where she worked as the Circulation Supervisor.   At NU Nicole oversees daytime services at the Help and Information Desk, and plays a key role on a variety of fronts including managing systems that help students and faculty reserve and utilize study spaces in Snell Library.  Originally from San Francisco, CA, Nicole has a BA in English from the College of Wooster and an MA in Library Science from Simmons College.  Prior to libraries, Nicole worked in administration at the University of California’s Hastings College of Law.  Reach Nicole at ni.thomas@northeastern.edu.

 

WilliamsBSquareBrooke Williams – Research and Instruction Librarian Brooke Williams comes to Northeastern from the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she worked closely with undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty to support teaching and learning.  Brooke brings expertise in designing and implementing online library instruction modules, experience teaching in credit-bearing information literacy courses, and experience mentoring students immersed in capstone projects. Brooke has a BA in American Studies/English from Skidmore College and an MA in Library and Information Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  At Northeastern Brooke supports students and faculty in Communications Studies and Journalism.  Reach Brooke at b.williams@northeastern.edu.

 

Posted in: Library News and Events, Serendipity

15
Sep16

The Media and Boston Public Schools Desegregation

Posted by: Jessica Bennett

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Unpublished photograph by Clif Garboden September 1974

Unpublished photograph by Clif Garboden
September 1974

When the court-ordered desegregation of the Boston Public School system led to controversial practice of busing in the 1970s, the local and national media covered it prolifically. Pictures of protests and school buses flanked by police officers made for eye-catching footage. But as Phase II of Busing approached in September of 1975, some residents felt they were being unfairly represented.  Citizens of Charlestown complained that “the national media is always throwing up that we’re a violent people” as Newsweek reporters camped out to see “the second act of Boston’s national spectacle.” To some extent, the Boston Phoenix, did the same.[1] However, very few pictures of anti-busing protests appear in the paper. Those that do create an impact; one chilling example however shows a group of young white men standing around a burning effigy captioned with a racial slur published on September 16th.

The Boston Phoenix, September 16, 1975

The Boston Phoenix, September 16, 1975

The Boston Phoenix instead chose to focus on individuals, a piece on Judge Wendell Garrity, the federal judge who ordered the desegregation, ran on September 9, 1975 and an article written by Tom Sheehan, ran on September 16, 1975, titled “Three Families in the Midst of Busing” which profiled three families dealing with busing in different ways. The Hollis family, an African-American family being bused from Jamaica Plain to Charlestown, the McDonoughs, a white family being bused who supported the endeavor, and the Wrenns, a white family who opposed the decision. Even the articles regarding the protests focused on police officers and how they dealt with the protester’s attitudes towards them rather than the protesters themselves.

Alongside these articles Boston Phoenix readers looked into the faces of those taking part in the drama; school committee members, police officers, parents, and most all, the children. One of the most prolific of these photographers, capturing the faces of these players was Clif Garboden.

The Boston Phoenix, September 16, 1975

The Boston Phoenix, September 16, 1975

Clif Garboden began working for the Boston Phoenix as a freelancer in the late 1960s, eventually coming on the staff full-time. Garboden rose  to the position of Senior Editor by the time he left the Boston Phoenix in 2009. During the turbulent years of the sixties and seventies, Garboden took his share of photographs of events but many times he focused on the individuals involved. While he was still a college student at Boston University, his photographs captured speakers, musicians, and professors for BU News. Even at that early point in his career, his photographs show the events occurring without losing the individuality of the people in the crowd.

His work during Busing is no different. The September 9th article on Judge Garrity includes not only a photograph by Garboden of the school committee in session which gives a sense of their work environment but the next page also provides close-ups of the members, their large name plagues dominating the foreground and their expressions betraying their thoughts and emotions of the subject matter. In the article “Three Families in the Midst of Busing”, Garboden photographed the pro-busing family the McDonoughs. While the photographers of the other two families chose to portray their subjects in the midst of action, Garboden’s shots are portraits, leaving it up to the reader to make their own judgement. This is not simply an editing choice, the Garboden Negative Collection, now available at Northeastern University’s Archives, shows that every shot he took was framed in this manner.

Anti-Busing Rally, Charlestown, August 1975 Unpublished Photo by Clif Garboden

Anti-Busing Rally, Charlestown, August 1975
Unpublished Photo by Clif Garboden

The Garboden Negative Collection offers a peak into the editorial practices of the Boston Phoenix.  Garboden did take photographs of an anti-busing rally in Charleston but none of them ever made it to the paper. He took pictures of the reporting being done by the television news stations, possibly for an article regarding how the rest of the media was portraying the events. Instead, one of the most beautiful pictures he contributed to the Busing articles shows a lines of children, mostly Asian-American lined up at a bus stop in Chinatown accompanying an article by Nancy Pomerene. Although only one was published, the negatives show the amount of time Garboden took trying to preserve the sweet smiles of children who just wanted to go to school.

In the midst of the hullabaloo Garboden and the Boston Phoenix tried to highlight the stories of those overshadowed by the rest of the media and their collections allow those narratives to remain for future generations.

 

 

 


 

[1] Dumanoski, Dianne. “Charlestown – ‘My Town” – Braces for Busing.” The Boston Phoenix, September 02, 1975.

Posted in: Archives and Special Collections, Collections, Serendipity

7
Sep16

Recently digitized video collection shares highlights from Northeastern’s history

Posted by: Joey Heinen

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One of the Library’s Digital Publishing program’s main goals is to digitize and disseminate high-interest, Northeastern-produced materials in the Archives and elsewhere on campus. The Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections collects, preserves, and provides access to significant moments from the University’s history as well as the history of underrepresented communities in the Boston area. Preserving some of the prized video assets from both the social justice and Northeastern collections has been a particular focus lately, and some recently digitized hidden gems from the University Photography and Media Collection happens to showcase both vital Northeastern history and social issues affecting the community around it.

One particular highlight is a video of a speech which Jesse Jackson gave on campus in 1987. In it, Jackson, well-known as an advocate for the African-American community, speaks mainly about the AIDS crisis; specifically addressing the unwillingness of the Reagan administration to combat the epidemic (16,908 people died that year). Jackson highlights the economic, racial, and social disparities that were so deeply embedded in the AIDS epidemic, and calls on local and national leaders to do what they can. You can view this video and others like it in the University Photography and Media Collection.

Jesse Jackson speaking at Northeastern, 1987

Jesse Jackson speaking at Northeastern, 1987

Posted in: African-American Studies, Archives and Special Collections, Biology, Health Sciences, Online Collections, Political Science, Serendipity

31
Aug16

Time for a new Husky Card!

Posted by: G. Karen Merguerian

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Are you a new student, and you’d like to explore the library, maybe read some magazines or check out the study spaces, before classes begin?

Are you a returning student or staff member, but you’re still swiping instead of tapping?

Do you wish you could just lay your wallet on the gate sensors instead of digging around inside it and pulling out your card every single time?

If so, now is the time for a new Husky Card! 

Usually you have to walk over to Speare Hall to get a card, but from now until the first day of classes, Husky Card Services has set up shop and is issuing cards from the convenience of the Curry Student Center.  They will be there every day, including Saturday and Sunday, from now until Monday, September 5.

So go to Curry 242 (Dance Studios) and get your new card today!

husky cards

Posted in: Serendipity, Tech Alerts

16
Aug16

Deadline for course reserves extended to August 24

Posted by: Erin Beach

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Faculty and TAs, this is the perfect time of year to submit your requests for Fall 2016 course reserves. We will continue to accept and process requests throughout the semester but to ensure your items will be available to students the first week of classes, please have your forms submitted by Wednesday, August 24!

Submitting a request is easy; just follow the course reserves link under the “Library” tab on myNEU and fill out the form.  We also have paper forms available at the Help and Information Desk on the first floor.

For a list of the types of materials that you can put on reserve, check out the reserves page on our website.

Any questions? Feel free to send me an email at LibraryReserves@northeastern.edu or call 617-373-3397.

Posted in: Serendipity