Serendipity

25
Mar15

Language learning program trials: Try both out and let us know!

Posted by: Andrew Gaudio

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Looking to learn a new language, or brush up on one you are already familiar with? Snell Library has trials to two language learning programs: Mango Languages and Pronunciator. (Log-in information below.) Mango’s trial ends on April 16 and Pronunciator’s ends on April 10. Try them out while you can!

Both programs offer similar features such as:

  • Key phrases and expressions in the target language
  • Narration by native speakers to show you how to pronounce each word
  • Cultural bits of information which help you get a sense of proper etiquette in the country where the language you are learning is spoken
  • Media in the form of radio broadcasts and films with subtitles to help you with your listening comprehension
  • Media can be played back at varying speeds to suit your level of comprehension
  • Exercises and quizzes to see what you have learned
  • Mango offers 63 languages, Prounciator offers 80

Now for the differences:

  • Pronunciator allows you to select any language as your source language and any language as your target language. If you choose German as your source language and Thai as your target language, you would be learning Thai with instruction in German.
  • Mango does not have mix and match capabilities, but it does offer English courses for non-English speakers of Polish, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Vietnamese, Turkish, Greek, Russian, Armenian, Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.
  • Pronunciator will match the pitches of different vowels of words to music notes so you can hear the differing tones of different vowel sounds.
  • Pronunciator gives you the option of playing only the voice, the notes, or both the voice and notes.

 

Screenshot from Pronunciator’s Vietnamese course.

 

  • With Pronunciator’s writing tool, the narrator speaks a word or phrase in the target language, and you can write the word and insert vowels with diacritics using the virtual keyboard.
  • Pronunciator takes accurate diacritic marks into account. Red letters indicate that the diacritics are either incorrect or missing.

 

Screenshot of Pronunciator’s writing tool.

 

  • Mango color codes parts of speech in both languages to show the user which parts of speech in the language being learned correspond with those in the user’s native language.

 

Screenshot from Mango matching English words to Vietnamese words.

 

Pronunciator and Mango have apps available for mobile devices including iOS and Android devices: Pronunciator apps | Mango apps

 

The URL for the free trials are:

Pronunciator: learning.pronunciator.com/ne.php

Log in: ne

Password ne

Mango:connect.mangolanguages.com/northeastern-university-trial/try/f814b6af0

 

Try out both and let us know what you think!

 

 

Posted in: Serendipity

6
Mar15

ACI Scholarly Blog Index: Research Powered by Social Media

Posted by: Amy Lewontin

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Academic bloggers work hard to get new research in the sciences, engineering, the humanities and social sciences out to the world as quickly as possible.

So how do you keep up with so much interesting and important scholarly material? Try taking a look at ACI Scholarly Blog Index, a very new resource that the Northeastern University Libraries is currently beta-testing. ACI Scholarly Blog Index was created with students and faculty in mind as a tool to help you spend less time looking at irrelevant material on the web.

Looking for the best bloggers in economics, medicine, or politics? Try a search in the ACI Scholarly Blog Index. You’ll learn about the authors of the blog and what kind of academic work they are engaged in. Want to know who is writing about chemistry from a particular university?  ACI Scholarly Blog Index is also perfect for that.

All of ACI’s blogs are individually chosen by researchers with expertise in that blog’s topic or field of study.  If you are the author of a scholarly blog, and would like to suggest your blog or one your read regularly be included, there is a recommend a blog form.

You can easily create an account to search and save material you locate via ACI.  Use your Northeastern e-mail address and then create a password, of your own choosing. Why else should you try creating an account with ACI? You will see the full text of the blogs, not just an abstract.  Blog records can be downloaded and saved and your citations can be exported to Mendeley, EndNote,  or Zotero. Without logging in, the default is MLA.

Watch this helpful video for more information about logging in.

To find out more about using ACI, see the Support site here.

Let us know what you think!  Review ACI Blog Index here!

 

Photo: support.newstex.com/support/articles/201150-how-do-i-perform-a-search-in-the-aci-scholarly-blog-index 

Posted in: Library News and Events, Research Online, Serendipity

25
Feb15

NASCAR Fans and Pinterest

Posted by: Diann Smothers

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I bet you, like me, have been wondering: ‘How many NASCAR fans use their tablet to follow a sport on Pinterest?’ I’m not going to tell you how many, but I will tell you this: You can find out using SBRnet. SBRnet provides market research for US sports – you can get information about fan participation, venues, teams, logo apparel, sport sponsorship, and more.

This table created by SBRNet shows the percentage of fans using Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+, Pinterest and Tumblr on their mobile devices while attending a game in 2014:

 

Interested in learning more? You can browse through their newsletters, or go directly to SBRnet to start exploring.

 

Posted in: Research Online, Serendipity

5
Feb15

2015 Call for Proposals: The DRS Project Toolkit

Posted by: Jen Anderle

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Call for Proposals
Deadline: March 30
Apply here

 

The Digital Scholarship Group is now accepting proposals for pilot projects to test the DRS Project Toolkit: a new user-friendly set of tools for building digital scholarly projects and publications using the Northeastern University Libraries Digital Repository Service. With the DRS Project Toolkit, Northeastern University members can use Omeka and WordPress to create projects that draw digital materials such as images, texts, and video dynamically from the DRS.

Through the development of the DRS Project Toolkit we hope to establish a simple process to serve project materials using various web publishing tools. During this pilot phase we focus on establishing a base set of features supported by the Toolkit, and we will also work with each individual project to discover unique Toolkit features could be developed and shared with other projects, like interactive maps or timelines.

The inaugural round of development for DRS Project Toolkit will be a collaborative endeavor and a great opportunity to experiment with publishing your project’s materials. If you have a project idea, we’d love to hear from you! Just answer a few questions about your project to apply.

 

 

 

To see an example of the Toolkit elements in practice, check out the Terp Talks video series portal from the National Consortium of Interpreter Education Centers. The site itself is built using WordPress, but the video content and metadata are stored in the DRS.

 

For more information about the DRS Project Toolkit, view the Call for Proposals, or contact us at DSG@neu.edu to set up a meeting.

 

Written by Sarah Sweeney, Digital Repository Manager, Digital Scholarship Group.

 

Posted in: Serendipity

4
Dec14

Studying for Finals in Snell: 20 Things Only Huskies Will Understand

Posted by: Jennie Robbiano

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Walking into the library like

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*2 hours later*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ok, time to study!…or not

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dealing with the effects of your procrastination in Argo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trying to share a table with someone who took up all the space

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When you find an empty table on the third floor during finals week…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Only to realize it’s under an air vent…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But then remember you brought a sweatshirt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Realizing that your to-do list is longer than you thought

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When someone asks what you’re studying

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trying to focus…

 

 

 

 

 

 

Especially when there are people talking in the stairwell…on the silent floor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When you realize that you just spent 3 hours on BuzzFeed for your five minute break


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finishing the problem you’ve been working on for hours

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leaving the library at 3 am and seeing everyone still studying

 

 

 

 

 

 

Running to get home in the middle of the night

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taking the library shuttle home instead

 

 

 

 

 

Getting home after being in the library all night

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When all those hours in Snell payoff and you ace your exam

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good luck on finals, Huskies! Have a wonderful winter break. We’ll see you in the spring.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in: Serendipity