Serendipity

2
Oct12

New Resource for Students and Practitioners in Counseling, School Psychology, Psychiatric Nursing, and More!

Posted by: Katherine Herrlich

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Counseling and Therapy in Video Volume 1  from Alexander Street Press (current NU only) is now available.

This valuable resource includes over 400 hours of training videos, reenactments, and real-life therapy sessions. Counseling and Therapy in Video Volume 1 is a great tool for counselors-in-training, as it allows one to observe, in face-to-face sessions, subtleties of body language, facial expressions, behavior, speech patterns and intonation.

Some of the perks: every video includes a synchronized transcript. Users can create, edit, and share playlists or clips. Videos are searchable by keywords and subjects, and arranged by easy-to-browse topical subject areas and therapeutic methods.

For example, you could search for Gestalt, Solution Focused, or Family Therapy sessions. You could search for clips where a client diagnosed with depression uses the word drink.  Or you could compare and contrast how cognitive-behavioral therapists and client-centered therapists treat a similar condition.

You can browse all titles or search by subject or therapy type.

This resource is listed on the A-Z Index (under the FIND menu) and on my psychology subject guide. The subject guide includes my contact information– I am interested to hear your comments and questions about this new acquisition.

Posted in: Education, Health Sciences, Library News and Events, Psychology, Read, Listen, Watch, Research Online, Serendipity

17
Sep12

5 ways to protect your valuables

Posted by: G. Karen Merguerian

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Every week you read that student laptops and backpacks disappear from campus lounges, labs, and, of course, even Snell Library. While no method is foolproof in preventing theft, here are some things you can do to reduce the likelihood that your valuables will be stolen:

1. Purchase and carry a laptop lock.  It’s true that a determined thief can use boltcutters or other strategies to thwart a lock, but locks do prevent opportunistic theft by someone walking by and looking for an easy target.  Lock your laptop to anchors on our tables and desks, or to anything secure.  You can find more information about laptop locks at SecureNU.

2. Borrow a laptop lock. We have locks you can borrow at the Circulation Desk on the first floor of Snell Library. Be aware that they may not work with every device (Macbook Air, I’m looking at you!)–which is why buying your own lock may be a better choice.

3. Don’t bring your laptop! We have laptops, ipads, cameras and graphic tablets that you can borrow (along with a lock, by the way!) or just use one of the hundreds of Mac and PC computers on every floor of Snell Library and in the Infocommons.

4. Don’t leave anything unattended. It sounds obvious, but it’s so tempting to think, “I’m sure it’s OK to leave my stuff for a couple of secs and run over to Argo Tea or the restroom.”  Don’t do it–sadly, that’s when most thefts happen. Take your valuables with you.

5. Use your judgment and don’t rely on others. If you tell a stranger to watch your stuff, both the stuff and the stranger may be gone when you return!

If you notice anything missing, please report it immediately to the Circulation Desk on the first floor.  We can check our lost and found and help you to follow up with Campus Security if needed.

Posted in: Information and Society, Serendipity

14
Sep12

Introducing a new guest blogger

Posted by: Kristina Lopez

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Hello Huskies!

My name is Kristina Lopez, I am a third year criminal justice major and history minor. I am also the Vice President for Academic Affairs in the Student Government Association, and I am honored to be a guest blogger for Club Snell!

I have spent countless hours in the library working on different projects and assignments, and I look forward to giving both a student perspective as well as the perspective of someone who works closely with the library to see through all the exciting changes that happen there!

I am always available for comments or questions; you can email me at lopez.k@husky.neu.edu or stop by the SGA office in 332 Curry!

Posted in: Library News and Events, Serendipity

6
Aug12

New: African Newspapers, 1800-1922

Posted by: Jamie Dendy

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Northeastern University Libraries now provides access to over 40 historical newspapers from throughout Africa. Key titles include the East African Standard, Baira Post, and Cape Town Gazette. Newspaper languages include English, French, German, Sotho, and others.

This online, fully searchable collection supports the World History Program, as well as other key programs at the university. Additional resources can be found on the History Subject Guide.

Posted in: Serendipity

26
Jul12

Suggested Summer Stories from Snell Staff

Posted by: Jen Anderle

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There are 42 days until the first day of fall semester classes.  That’s six solid weeks; more than enough time to take advantage of the rest of the summer by reading some great books!

Here are some suggestions from our library staff to get you started. Click on the book title to see the record for the book in our collection. — Jen

 

River of Smoke 

by Amitav Ghosh

Suggested by Will Wakeling

I’m just finishing Amitav Ghosh’s River of Smoke, the 2nd volume of the historical trilogy begun with the wonderful and exotic Sea of Poppies. Everything you ever wanted to know about the early 19th century opium trade into Canton and southern China. A great way to learn the basics of Chinese Pidgin English, too – worth a “look-see.”

 

Bring Up the Bodies

by Hilary Mantel

Suggested by Ethan Bren

I read Bring Up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel. It’s the sequel to Wolf Hall, which won the Man Booker Prize in 2009. Both books are really terrific pieces of historical fiction that I enjoyed immensely.

 

 

 Graceling

by Kristin Cashore

Suggested by Krishna Patel

My vote would be for Graceling and its sequel, Bitterblue, and the companion as well, Fire – all of which we own!  Written by a local (squee!), it’s a beautifully crafted fantasy tale about two delightfully strong and unorthodox ladies in a Tolkien-meets-King-Arthur sort of way.

I’ve been suggesting them like a crazy person to anyone who asks, and I’ve not had bad feedback yet.

Take that, Twilight!

 

Canada
by Richard Ford

Suggested by Jamie Dendy

It carries one away through a riveting plot, yet drops one on the ground from time to time to ponder issues of crime and inheritance.

 

 

 

Dogma
by Lars Iyer

Suggested by Karen Merguerian

Lars joined us for one of our Meet the Author Talks in Spring 2012! Watch the video here.

 

 

 

The Drunkard’s Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives
by Leonard Mlodinow

Suggested by Jen Ferguson

What I’m loving about it: Who knew that a book about probability could be so engaging?

 

 

 

Now go forth and capture some quality summer days! Soak up the weather, drink something sweet and cold, and read your book way too fast.

Posted in: Read, Listen, Watch, Serendipity, Staff Interests