Serendipity

7
Sep16

Recently digitized video collection shares highlights from Northeastern’s history

Posted by: Joey Heinen

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One of the Library’s Digital Publishing program’s main goals is to digitize and disseminate high-interest, Northeastern-produced materials in the Archives and elsewhere on campus. The Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections collects, preserves, and provides access to significant moments from the University’s history as well as the history of underrepresented communities in the Boston area. Preserving some of the prized video assets from both the social justice and Northeastern collections has been a particular focus lately, and some recently digitized hidden gems from the University Photography and Media Collection happens to showcase both vital Northeastern history and social issues affecting the community around it.

One particular highlight is a video of a speech which Jesse Jackson gave on campus in 1987. In it, Jackson, well-known as an advocate for the African-American community, speaks mainly about the AIDS crisis; specifically addressing the unwillingness of the Reagan administration to combat the epidemic (16,908 people died that year). Jackson highlights the economic, racial, and social disparities that were so deeply embedded in the AIDS epidemic, and calls on local and national leaders to do what they can. You can view this video and others like it in the University Photography and Media Collection.

Jesse Jackson speaking at Northeastern, 1987

Jesse Jackson speaking at Northeastern, 1987

Posted in: African-American Studies, Archives and Special Collections, Biology, Health Sciences, Online Collections, Political Science, Serendipity

31
Aug16

Time for a new Husky Card!

Posted by: G. Karen Merguerian

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Are you a new student, and you’d like to explore the library, maybe read some magazines or check out the study spaces, before classes begin?

Are you a returning student or staff member, but you’re still swiping instead of tapping?

Do you wish you could just lay your wallet on the gate sensors instead of digging around inside it and pulling out your card every single time?

If so, now is the time for a new Husky Card! 

Usually you have to walk over to Speare Hall to get a card, but from now until the first day of classes, Husky Card Services has set up shop and is issuing cards from the convenience of the Curry Student Center.  They will be there every day, including Saturday and Sunday, from now until Monday, September 5.

So go to Curry 242 (Dance Studios) and get your new card today!

husky cards

Posted in: Serendipity, Tech Alerts

16
Aug16

Deadline for course reserves extended to August 24

Posted by: Erin Beach

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Faculty and TAs, this is the perfect time of year to submit your requests for Fall 2016 course reserves. We will continue to accept and process requests throughout the semester but to ensure your items will be available to students the first week of classes, please have your forms submitted by Wednesday, August 24!

Submitting a request is easy; just follow the course reserves link under the “Library” tab on myNEU and fill out the form.  We also have paper forms available at the Help and Information Desk on the first floor.

For a list of the types of materials that you can put on reserve, check out the reserves page on our website.

Any questions? Feel free to send me an email at LibraryReserves@northeastern.edu or call 617-373-3397.

Posted in: Serendipity

13
Jun16

Celebrate Pride with the Boston Gay Men’s Chorus records

Posted by: Dominique Medal

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When the Boston Gay Men’s Chorus (BGMC) gave its first concert in June 1982, they were beginning an annual tradition of singing with pride during Pride.

2016-2017 will be BGMC’s 35th concert season. Let’s take a look back on their first ten years of celebrating Pride with the Boston community.

Boston Gay Men's Chorus 10th Anniversary promotional mailer.

10th Anniversary mailer.

Section of the concert program, June 1987.

Section of the concert program, June 1987.

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Posted in: Archives and Special Collections, Serendipity

7
Jun16

Celebrate Pride Month!

Posted by: Kaley Bachelder

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In case you haven’t heard, June is LGBT Pride Month! Celebrate by reading one of these LGBT books:

rubyfruit jungle

Rubyfruit Jungle by Rita Mae Brown

Rubyfruit Jungle, first published in 1973 and still painfully relevant today, follows protagonist Molly Bolt, comfortable as lesbian though everyone around her isn’t. While the slang the characters use won’t let you forget this book is from the ‘70s, Molly’s life as a queer individual is not so different than some people’s today, and it’s refreshing to follow a character whose sexual identity does not result in ultimate unhappiness, but drives her to succeed.

 

 

aristotle and danteAristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

No, this book is not about a philosopher and a poet traversing through space and time (but wouldn’t that be great?!). In Sáenz’s novel, two Mexican-American boys grapple with car crashes, romance, and hate crime in the 1980s. As they grow older, they seek the definition of love and acceptance for who they are.

 

 

 

the night wastchThe Night Watch by Sarah Waters

Starting in 1947 and working its way back to 1941, The Night Watch follows the lives of four twenty-something year olds trying to piece their lives together in WWII London. Each character’s story is told separately, often with guest appearances from some of the others. The narrative moves backwards in time, so as you go you’ll learn more about events that were only hinted at previously and discover what made these people who they are.

 

 

liquorLiquor by Poppy Z. Brite

First in its series by trans writer Poppy Z. Brite, Liquor stars Rickey and G-Man, best friends, boyfriends, and line cooks in New Orleans. When Rickey is unexpectedly fired, the two decide to open a restaurant where every dish is cooked with some sort of liquor. The protagonists of this novel are gay, but the plot has nothing to do with their sexuality, offering a welcome change from the typical coming-out story.

 

 

Sorrsorry, treey, Tree by Eileen Myles

This collection by punk poet Eileen Myles combines love with politics to take a definitive stance on what it means to be a lesbian. With her signature style of haphazard rhythm and unmetered stanzas, Myles’ work feels raw and powerful. It’s only 83 pages—bring it for your T ride to Boston Pride Festival this Saturday!

Posted in: Serendipity