Serendipity

13
Nov12

How Children Succeed: A conversation with author Paul Tough

Posted by: Jen Anderle

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Author Paul Tough

By Emily Huizenga

Journalist Paul Tough visited Snell Library November 8th to discuss his latest book, How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character.

Emily Mann of the Human Services department gave Tough a brief introduction, describing his book as “one with humor and substance, one that questions conventions.”

Tough began his discussion of How Children Succeed with the suggestion that parents and educators have been emphasizing “the wrong skills and activities in the cognitive development of kids.” He described his travels around the country when writing the book: talking to researchers, educators, and students at both private academies and inner-city schools, studying everything from chess players to lab rats.

Ultimately, he concluded that “character education,” not just test scores, may be key to children’s success. He laughed, admitting that when he wasn’t doing research for his book he couldn’t help but think of his own son, then just an infant, as “a little experiment subject.”

Tough

Tough emphasized one discovery that he said even he found surprising. He said, “If we want children to succeed, we must first let them fail.” He explained the stress-response system, which children develop at infancy. While “too much damage can last a lifetime,” some conflict and stress is necessary so kids can develop what researchers are now calling “grit.”

Tough likened the idea to the difference between exercising on a treadmill and exercising by climbing a mountain: both will get you in shape, but only one has the added stress of the possibility of failure. This, he said, is key to fostering seven character strengths some educators are now deeming important to success: optimism, zest, curiosity, social intelligence, gratitude, self-control, and grit.

“What we have in this country is an adversity gap,” Tough said, explaining some kids need more chances to fail, more “inner strength,” while others need more nurturing, more care. In both cases, Tough said, the common denominator is the caregiver.

Read more in the e-book of How Children Succeed in the library’s collection here.

 

We would like to thank Human Services for bringing Paul Tough to campus, and a huge thank you to Paul Tough for such an engaging author talk!

 

Posted in: Serendipity

9
Nov12

Touring the DMC on Parents’ Weekend

Posted by: Kristina Lopez

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Students in the Digital Media Commons

Students in the Digital Media Commons

With the appearance of Hurricane Sandy, this year’s parent’s weekend was even more eventful than usual! Many different programs and events happened all across campus but one of the most exciting was a presentation in 246 Snell.

The Library ran a few programs during Parents Weekend: on Friday, tours were given of the newly renovated Digital Media Commons. On Saturday the main event was at 1pm, where Associate Dean of Libraries Patrick Yott gave a presentation where he discussed the many exciting new additions to the second floor as well as what can be expected in the coming years. Both parents and students were equally impressed with the new space; a parent even noted that this was not “her Mother’s Northeastern”.

An overview of the space was followed by a question and answer portion where parents were able to ask a number of questions about the new technology and space.  After the question and answer time tours were led by Nina Shah and Tom Urell of Snell Library. Parents and students alike were treated to an in depth look at the new areas of the DMC, from the moveable-wall “tents” that surround computer stations to the recently opened Room-5, with 3-way projection and surround sound.  The space truly lived up to what AD Yott called a space that encourages serendipity.

A peek of the new printing rooms gave students something to look forward to as they are scheduled to open soon! For more info check out @ClubSnell on twitter or stop by the DMC!

Posted in: Serendipity

2
Oct12

New Resource for Students and Practitioners in Counseling, School Psychology, Psychiatric Nursing, and More!

Posted by: Katherine Herrlich

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Counseling and Therapy in Video Volume 1  from Alexander Street Press (current NU only) is now available.

This valuable resource includes over 400 hours of training videos, reenactments, and real-life therapy sessions. Counseling and Therapy in Video Volume 1 is a great tool for counselors-in-training, as it allows one to observe, in face-to-face sessions, subtleties of body language, facial expressions, behavior, speech patterns and intonation.

Some of the perks: every video includes a synchronized transcript. Users can create, edit, and share playlists or clips. Videos are searchable by keywords and subjects, and arranged by easy-to-browse topical subject areas and therapeutic methods.

For example, you could search for Gestalt, Solution Focused, or Family Therapy sessions. You could search for clips where a client diagnosed with depression uses the word drink.  Or you could compare and contrast how cognitive-behavioral therapists and client-centered therapists treat a similar condition.

You can browse all titles or search by subject or therapy type.

This resource is listed on the A-Z Index (under the FIND menu) and on my psychology subject guide. The subject guide includes my contact information– I am interested to hear your comments and questions about this new acquisition.

Posted in: Education, Health Sciences, Library News and Events, Psychology, Read, Listen, Watch, Research Online, Serendipity

17
Sep12

5 ways to protect your valuables

Posted by: G. Karen Merguerian

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Every week you read that student laptops and backpacks disappear from campus lounges, labs, and, of course, even Snell Library. While no method is foolproof in preventing theft, here are some things you can do to reduce the likelihood that your valuables will be stolen:

1. Purchase and carry a laptop lock.  It’s true that a determined thief can use boltcutters or other strategies to thwart a lock, but locks do prevent opportunistic theft by someone walking by and looking for an easy target.  Lock your laptop to anchors on our tables and desks, or to anything secure.  You can find more information about laptop locks at SecureNU.

2. Borrow a laptop lock. We have locks you can borrow at the Circulation Desk on the first floor of Snell Library. Be aware that they may not work with every device (Macbook Air, I’m looking at you!)–which is why buying your own lock may be a better choice.

3. Don’t bring your laptop! We have laptops, ipads, cameras and graphic tablets that you can borrow (along with a lock, by the way!) or just use one of the hundreds of Mac and PC computers on every floor of Snell Library and in the Infocommons.

4. Don’t leave anything unattended. It sounds obvious, but it’s so tempting to think, “I’m sure it’s OK to leave my stuff for a couple of secs and run over to Argo Tea or the restroom.”  Don’t do it–sadly, that’s when most thefts happen. Take your valuables with you.

5. Use your judgment and don’t rely on others. If you tell a stranger to watch your stuff, both the stuff and the stranger may be gone when you return!

If you notice anything missing, please report it immediately to the Circulation Desk on the first floor.  We can check our lost and found and help you to follow up with Campus Security if needed.

Posted in: Information and Society, Serendipity

14
Sep12

Introducing a new guest blogger

Posted by: Kristina Lopez

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Hello Huskies!

My name is Kristina Lopez, I am a third year criminal justice major and history minor. I am also the Vice President for Academic Affairs in the Student Government Association, and I am honored to be a guest blogger for Club Snell!

I have spent countless hours in the library working on different projects and assignments, and I look forward to giving both a student perspective as well as the perspective of someone who works closely with the library to see through all the exciting changes that happen there!

I am always available for comments or questions; you can email me at lopez.k@husky.neu.edu or stop by the SGA office in 332 Curry!

Posted in: Library News and Events, Serendipity