Collections

6
Oct17

Now’s Your Chance to Meet the Press!

Posted by: Brooke Williams

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Eleanor Roosevelt is seated at a table on the Meet the Press set. She is smiling at a man standing behind her. Host Ned Brooks is seated next to them.

September 16, 1956: Eleanor Roosevelt is seated at a table on the Meet the Press set in New York City. She is smiling at a man standing behind her. Host Ned Brooks is seated next to them.

Meet the Press has been on television longer than any other program in history. The show premiered in 1947, and it’s been a cornerstone of the American cultural and political landscape ever since. It’s the first show to ever conduct a live interview via satellite (in 1965, with British Prime Minister Harold Wilson) and the first live network news show to ever host a sitting president (Gerald Ford, in 1975). Since Ford, every American president has dropped by Meet the Press at least once.

Now, all of this history, much of which has been unseen since its original television broadcast, is just a few clicks away. Over the summer, Snell Library acquired access to the full surviving run of Meet the Press, from 1947 to today, through Alexander Street Press. That’s almost 1500 hours—or 62.5 days—of video available to you for free, dating back to 1957. You can watch Eleanor Roosevelt talk politics in the 1950s; see Martin Luther King, Jr. discuss the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s; hear Dan Rostenkowski describe Reaganomics in the 1980s; or watch Ross Perot’s presidential campaign unfold in the 1990s. Many episodes include detailed transcripts and closed captioning.

Meet the Press is available from our A-Z Databases list. You can also click here for direct access. If you are off campus, you may be asked to sign in with your NEU ID and password.

Posted in: Communication Studies, Economics, History, Information and Society, Journalism and International Affairs, Online Collections, Political Science, Read, Listen, Watch, Serendipity, Sociology

8
Sep17

Select Archives and Special Collections materials are now available in the Digital Public Library of America

Posted by: Sarah Sweeney

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NAACP pickets School CommitteeNearly 9,000 primary source documents and images curated and digitized by Northeastern University Libraries’ Archives and Special Collections are now available in the Digital Public Library of America. The DPLA is a national resource that brings together digital materials held by American libraries, archives, and museums. Northeastern University Libraries’ contribution to DPLA was made possible through our membership in Digital Commonwealth (our local DPLA Hub), who harvest the metadata and thumbnails from the DRS and make them available in the DPLA.

The full set of contributed materials include videos from Northeastern’s Holocaust Awareness Week programming, records from the Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción community development program, and many more. More than a third of the contributed materials document the desegregation of Boston Public Schools and busing of students in the 1970’s and 1980’s. With assistance from the library’s Digital Metadata & Ingest group, Archives staff organized, selected, and digitized approximately 3,300 photographs, documents, and other printed ephemera created in the years before and after the busing proclamation was issued by Judge Garrity in 1974.

The Archives chose to focus on Boston’s history of desegregation as part of a coordinated effort with other institutions in the Boston Library Consortium to collect and digitize materials that “illuminate the complexity of state- and city-wide politics, community activism, and advocacy.” As Northeastern, UMass Boston, Suffolk University, and other Boston-area institutions make their primary source materials available to the public, the DPLA’s collection of artifacts documenting the desegregation of Boston Public Schools will grow. The end result will be a robust shared archive that will aid in national teaching and learning activities focused on the history and legacy of segregation and racism in the Unites States. The Boston Public Schools, for example, are already integrating these primary sources into the curriculum in an effort to “ensure that every Boston Public Schools student learns about this important and troubling chapter in our city’s history.”

These 9,000 files are just the beginning of Northeastern University Libraries’ contribution to the DPLA; we will continue to contribute to Digital Commonwealth and DPLA as more materials become available in our local repository.

Posted in: Archives and Special Collections, Online Collections

1
Jul17

Finding the Fourth of July

Posted by: G. Karen Merguerian

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When a group of upstart colonists declared their territories independent of the British Crown on July 4, 1776, they did it in a petition addressed to King George III. In the weeks following, this Declaration of Independence was reprinted, discussed and debated both in the colonies and in Britain, in newspapers, letters, pamphlets, and broadsides.

You can now read those debates and discussions, and see them scanned online, whether celebratory, like a news item from New York:

We hear from Ticonderoga that on the 28th of July, immediately after divine Worship, the Declaration of independence was read by Colonel St. Clair, and having said, “God save the Free Independent States of America!” the army manifested their Joy with three Cheers. It was remarkably pleasing to see the Spirit of the Soldiers so raised after all their Calamities, the Language of every Man’s Countenance was, now we are a People! We have a Name among the States of this World.

New York, August 19, 1776. New York Gazette and Weekly Mercury.

or dismissive, as in an essay written by Tory Governor of Massachusetts Thomas Hutchinson:

They begin with a false hypothesis, That the Colonies are one distinct people and the kingdom another, connected by political bands. The colonies, politically considered never were a distinct people from the kingdom. There never has been but one political band, and that was just the same before the first Colonists emigrated as it has been ever since.

Hutchinson, Thomas, Strictures up the declaration of the Congress at Philadelphia, 1776.

These essays and much more are available in two of our newest licensed online collections: America’s Historical Newspapers, and Eighteenth Century Collections Online.

America’s Historical Newspapers (Series I, 1690-1876) spans an extraordinary period in our history, from the Salem Witch trials to post-Civil War reconstruction. With newspapers from every part of the United States, scanned from more than 90 repositories including the Library of Congress and the American Antiquarian Society, from Benjamin Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette to Alexander Hamilton’s New York Evening Post, this collection offers Northeastern researchers the first draft of American history.

Eighteenth Century Collections Online is the place to look for British perspectives.  Based on the English Short Title catalog, it offers scans of works published in Britain 18th century, plus English language publications from other parts of the world. The period encompasses Boswell’s Life of Johnson, Hume’s History of England, and an early how-to: Best’s Concise Treatise on the Art of Angling. With printed books, pamphlets, essays, and broadsides, this collection complements another important collection, Early English Books Online, to offer Northeastern researchers an online library encompassing almost the entire printed record of the English Renaissance as well as the English Enlightenment.

Exploring these two newly licensed collections allows us to understand, from the point of view of the people living at the time, the bonds that united Britain and America, as well as the forces that pulled us asunder.

Posted in: Collections

17
May17

Stream a New Movie this Summer

Posted by: Debra Mandel

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Summertime, and the viewing is easy…

a perfect time to catch up on movies and documentaries. When it’s too hot to sit outside with a good book, crank up the a.c. close the curtains, get out some snacks and hit play.

  • Pick your format! Snell Library has excellent DVD and streaming video collections. See this year’s academy award winning films on DVD. Classics, contemporary films, and documentaries will expand your horizons.
  • Locate videos by subject, keyword or title in Scholar OneSearch.
  • This icon Film Reel Iconwill appear beside a DVD, streaming videos will say “Online access”
  • Use this streaming media guide to locate titles by vendor and subject. Our largest vendors are Academic Video Online Premium and Kanopy with a wealth of informative and entertaining choices.

Here are some recommended streaming media titles. Feel free to write me about your favorites.

Full-Length Features:

  1. Au Revoir les Enfants- the story of friendship and loss between friends in Nazi-occupied France
  2. Charlie Chaplin silent films – see a few!
  3. Diabolique- a French murder tale–don’t miss this classic.
  4. Reaching for the Moon – depicts the relationship between poet Elizabeth Bishop and architect Lota de Macedo Soares.
  5. Stranger than Paradise– Jim Jarmusch’s transcendent adventures of a Hungarian émigré, his friend, and cousin.

Riveting Documentaries:

  1. The Belle of Amherst –a 1976 theatrical performance of Emily Dickinson by Julie Harris. See Cynthia Nixon’s portrayal of Emily in the film “A Quiet Passion” playing in local theaters.
  2. Grey Gardens– meet eccentric Big and Little Edie Beale: mother and daughter, high-society dropouts, and reclusive cousins of Jackie Onassis.
  3. Music of Strangers: Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble- be entertained by these international traveling musicians.
  4. Notes on Blindness– a mesmerizing experience of John Hull’s experience becoming blind as an adult, and how he has adapted to a world without sight.
  5. Photography Transformed:1960-1999– key photographers discusses photography’s effect on American life.

 

 

 

Posted in: Collections, Read, Listen, Watch

2
May17

Interlibrary Loan: Powering access to resources from around the globe

Posted by: Jon Reed

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Interlibrary Loan services come to the rescue when students and faculty need access to information the library doesn’t have. Whether it’s a book, journal/magazine article, or an article from a small newspaper published in the 1930s, the library works to ensure access to a diverse network of library collections and the ability to borrow from them. Here you can see libraries from around the world that have loaned to Northeastern. In addition to these, Northeastern borrows from hundreds of libraries in the United States and Canada ranging from large universities to small community colleges and public libraries. We’ve created an interactive map of all our interlibrary loan transactions in the past year and have highlighted some places where we’ve borrowed from below so you can see how far some of your resources have travelled.

ILL Map Blog Post ILL BLog Post Places

Posted in: Collections