Collections

1
Jul17

Finding the Fourth of July

Posted by: G. Karen Merguerian

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When a group of upstart colonists declared their territories independent of the British Crown on July 4, 1776, they did it in a petition addressed to King George III. In the weeks following, this Declaration of Independence was reprinted, discussed and debated both in the colonies and in Britain, in newspapers, letters, pamphlets, and broadsides.

You can now read those debates and discussions, and see them scanned online, whether celebratory, like a news item from New York:

We hear from Ticonderoga that on the 28th of July, immediately after divine Worship, the Declaration of independence was read by Colonel St. Clair, and having said, “God save the Free Independent States of America!” the army manifested their Joy with three Cheers. It was remarkably pleasing to see the Spirit of the Soldiers so raised after all their Calamities, the Language of every Man’s Countenance was, now we are a People! We have a Name among the States of this World.

New York, August 19, 1776. New York Gazette and Weekly Mercury.

or dismissive, as in an essay written by Tory Governor of Massachusetts Thomas Hutchinson:

They begin with a false hypothesis, That the Colonies are one distinct people and the kingdom another, connected by political bands. The colonies, politically considered never were a distinct people from the kingdom. There never has been but one political band, and that was just the same before the first Colonists emigrated as it has been ever since.

Hutchinson, Thomas, Strictures up the declaration of the Congress at Philadelphia, 1776.

These essays and much more are available in two of our newest licensed online collections: America’s Historical Newspapers, and Eighteenth Century Collections Online.

America’s Historical Newspapers (Series I, 1690-1876) spans an extraordinary period in our history, from the Salem Witch trials to post-Civil War reconstruction. With newspapers from every part of the United States, scanned from more than 90 repositories including the Library of Congress and the American Antiquarian Society, from Benjamin Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette to Alexander Hamilton’s New York Evening Post, this collection offers Northeastern researchers the first draft of American history.

Eighteenth Century Collections Online is the place to look for British perspectives.  Based on the English Short Title catalog, it offers scans of works published in Britain 18th century, plus English language publications from other parts of the world. The period encompasses Boswell’s Life of Johnson, Hume’s History of England, and an early how-to: Best’s Concise Treatise on the Art of Angling. With printed books, pamphlets, essays, and broadsides, this collection complements another important collection, Early English Books Online, to offer Northeastern researchers an online library encompassing almost the entire printed record of the English Renaissance as well as the English Enlightenment.

Exploring these two newly licensed collections allows us to understand, from the point of view of the people living at the time, the bonds that united Britain and America, as well as the forces that pulled us asunder.

Posted in: Collections

17
May17

Stream a New Movie this Summer

Posted by: Debra Mandel

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Summertime, and the viewing is easy…

a perfect time to catch up on movies and documentaries. When it’s too hot to sit outside with a good book, crank up the a.c. close the curtains, get out some snacks and hit play.

  • Pick your format! Snell Library has excellent DVD and streaming video collections. See this year’s academy award winning films on DVD. Classics, contemporary films, and documentaries will expand your horizons.
  • Locate videos by subject, keyword or title in Scholar OneSearch.
  • This icon Film Reel Iconwill appear beside a DVD, streaming videos will say “Online access”
  • Use this streaming media guide to locate titles by vendor and subject. Our largest vendors are Academic Video Online Premium and Kanopy with a wealth of informative and entertaining choices.

Here are some recommended streaming media titles. Feel free to write me about your favorites.

Full-Length Features:

  1. Au Revoir les Enfants- the story of friendship and loss between friends in Nazi-occupied France
  2. Charlie Chaplin silent films – see a few!
  3. Diabolique- a French murder tale–don’t miss this classic.
  4. Reaching for the Moon – depicts the relationship between poet Elizabeth Bishop and architect Lota de Macedo Soares.
  5. Stranger than Paradise– Jim Jarmusch’s transcendent adventures of a Hungarian émigré, his friend, and cousin.

Riveting Documentaries:

  1. The Belle of Amherst –a 1976 theatrical performance of Emily Dickinson by Julie Harris. See Cynthia Nixon’s portrayal of Emily in the film “A Quiet Passion” playing in local theaters.
  2. Grey Gardens– meet eccentric Big and Little Edie Beale: mother and daughter, high-society dropouts, and reclusive cousins of Jackie Onassis.
  3. Music of Strangers: Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble- be entertained by these international traveling musicians.
  4. Notes on Blindness– a mesmerizing experience of John Hull’s experience becoming blind as an adult, and how he has adapted to a world without sight.
  5. Photography Transformed:1960-1999– key photographers discusses photography’s effect on American life.

 

 

 

Posted in: Collections, Read, Listen, Watch

2
May17

Interlibrary Loan: Powering access to resources from around the globe

Posted by: Jon Reed

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Interlibrary Loan services come to the rescue when students and faculty need access to information the library doesn’t have. Whether it’s a book, journal/magazine article, or an article from a small newspaper published in the 1930s, the library works to ensure access to a diverse network of library collections and the ability to borrow from them. Here you can see libraries from around the world that have loaned to Northeastern. In addition to these, Northeastern borrows from hundreds of libraries in the United States and Canada ranging from large universities to small community colleges and public libraries. We’ve created an interactive map of all our interlibrary loan transactions in the past year and have highlighted some places where we’ve borrowed from below so you can see how far some of your resources have travelled.

ILL Map Blog Post ILL BLog Post Places

Posted in: Collections

21
Nov16

New and improved! Portal to Latino/a collections

Posted by: Giordana Mecagni

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betances1999

Announcing the Archives and Special Collections new portal to Boston’s latino/a history, http://latinohistory.library.northeastern.edu/!

Boston’s Latino/a Community History Collection contains images, documents, and posters selected from the Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción records and the La Alianza Hispana records held in the Northeastern University Libraries, Archives and Special Collections Department. The documents scanned from the collection include organizational charts and histories, committee and taskforce meeting minutes, fact sheets, by-laws, articles of incorporation, annual reports, program descriptions and brochures, newsletters, and organizational reports. The records available in this online collection document public policy formation, community relations, affordable housing, urban planning and housing rehabilitation, cultural and educational programming, violence prevention, and minority rights during the last decades of the 20th century.

The collection was originally scanned and made available in 2009 by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services but has since been completely overhauled.  Each item was given additional item-level metadata allowing users to dig deeper into the collection.  The searching and browsing interfaces were rebuilt using the Library’s Digital Scholarship Group’s CERES: Exhibit Toolkit, giving users immediate and searchable access to the collection.  CERES is a user-friendly platform with which faculty, staff, and student scholars at Northeastern University are building WordPress exhibits incorporating curated digital objects.

To learn more about the Digital Scholarship Group and CERES, go to http://dsg.neu.edu/the-drs-project-toolkit-is-now-ceres-exhibit-toolkit/

Posted in: Archives and Special Collections, Collections, Online Collections, Serendipity

10
Nov16

DRS Milestone: 100,000 Files!

Posted by: Sarah Sweeney

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King Husky Celebrates his first birthdayWe’re happy to announce that the Digital Repository Service (DRS) now contains more than 100,000 files! We reached this milestone earlier in the month as files were being uploaded into the Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción collection for Archives and Special Collections.

The 100,000 files stored in the DRS cover a broad range of topics, from dissertations about drug delivery systems, to images of specimens collected from the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument, to student posters produced for the 2016 Research, Innovation, and Scholarship Expo. New material is being added every day, so be sure to check in regularly to see what projects Northeastern’s faculty, staff, and students are working on!

As we celebrate this milestone, here are a few highlighted statistics to share with you:

  • In total, DRS files have accumulated 170,786 views, 165,997 downloads, and 2,326 audio or video streams.
  • The most popular files are from the Profile of Nonverbal Sensitivity (PONS), which is a psychological test that measures a subject’s ability to interpret nonverbal cues. Collectively the PONS materials have been viewed 2,464 times, downloaded 2,099 times, and the videos have been streamed through the DRS 806 times.
  • Archives and Special Collections’ Digital Collection has the largest number of files (53,407), as well as the highest total views (60,984) and downloads (47,604) for all files in a single community.

Onward to 500,000!

Posted in: Online Collections