Research Online


Snell Stacks are the Tip of the Iceberg

Posted by: Amira Aaron


Have you seen these new signs in the stacks?













We want to remind the Northeastern community that the most recent material on a topic is likely to be found in the Library’s online collections and not on the shelves. Scan the QR codes on the signs or go directly to Scholar OneSearch to be connected with an extensive online collection. Thousands of electronic books and journals are available to faculty, students and staff.

As more and more print information resources move online, Snell Library is able to offer to the Northeastern community a rich array of electronic resources including books, journals, primary source materials, multimedia works, and digitized archival collections. All of these are available on a 24/7 basis from any location, including a growing number of mobile devices, and most offer powerful search functionality and immediate access to the full text.

The Library’s focused transition from print to electronic collections supports the Northeastern University Global Network and is discussed in the Collection Development Policy (March 2013), which was approved by the Faculty Senate Committee on Library Policies and Operations.

And, speaking of online collections, the Library continues to expand the richness of primary source and other materials available to the Northeastern community. We are pleased to announce the recent availability of the following digital Gale Cengage newspaper collections:

  • 17th – 18th Century Burney Collection Newspapers gathered by the Reverend Charles Burney (1757 – 1817) represent the largest single collection of 17th and 18th century English news media.
  • 19th Century British Newspapers contains full runs of influential national and regional newspapers representing different political and cultural segments of British society.
  • 19th Century U.S. Newspapers provides access to primary source newspaper content from the 19th century, featuring full-text content and images from numerous newspapers from a range of urban and rural regions throughout the U.S.
  • Artemis Primary Sources is an integrated research tool that unifies extensive digital archives (including the collections above, the Illustrated London News Historical Archive [1842-2003], and the Times Digital Archive [1785- 2009]) and enables scholars to make new research connections.

Stay tuned to this blog for more announcements of new digital collections and primary source materials.

Posted in: Collections, Online Collections, Research Online


Boston Library Consortium signs letter to President Obama about Open Educational Resources

Posted by: Hillary Corbett


In June, the White House called for suggestions from the public for its third Open Government National Action Plan, to be released later this year. The purpose of this plan is to increase transparency in government as well as support open research and learning tools, which were identified as areas for development in the first two National Action Plans. The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), an international group of academic research libraries, has responded to this call with a letter advocating for increased support for the development of open educational resources. The Boston Library Consortium, of which Northeastern University is a member, has added its name as a signatory of this letter. We are proud to voice our support for open educational resources!

Open educational resources (OERs) are freely accessible learning objects that support teaching and learning at all levels – from kindergarten through higher education. Because they are openly licensed, educators can customize OERs or create mashups of different resources to provide their students with the material that best meets their teaching objectives. OERs include textbooks, audio and video materials, tests, software, interactive modules, and much more. Many are peer-reviewed either before or after being publicly released, so teachers can be assured of their quality.

OERs benefit students as well as educators—they serve as free alternatives to costly traditional textbooks. A recent NBC News story about the astronomical increase in textbook prices (more than triple the cost of inflation since 1977) quotes an incoming Northeastern first-year student on the struggle to afford college textbooks. OERs would help him and thousands of others get a high-quality education at a more affordable price. The Open Education Group, which conducts an ongoing review of empirical research on the use of OERs, reports that studies show students and educators using OERs are satisfied with the quality of these resources and that learning outcomes are equivalent to or better than those in classrooms using traditional resources.

Instructors and students, are you interested in learning more about open educational resources? Check out my guide to OERs and textbook alternatives, and please feel free to contact me if you have further questions.

Posted in: Information and Society, Research Online, Scholarly Communications


More scholarly content from Taylor and Francis!

Posted by: G. Karen Merguerian


The ink has just dried on our license to 1,700 scholarly e-journals from Taylor and Francis! This means more full text PDFs available when you’re linking from Scholar OneSearch, PubMed, Google Scholar, or whatever your favorite research starting point might be.

It means less ordering from Interlibrary Loan for you, the researcher.

And more space for student work and study, as we can remove print volumes of bound journals from the Snell Library stacks to make room for new tables and chairs.

The collection includes publications from Taylor and Francis, Routledge, and Psychology Press. Older issues are available going back to 1997 (if the journal is that old).

Other features:

  • Search by keyword or use the advanced search fields.
  • Select and save favorite Taylor & Francis Online resources by adding them to a marked list.
  • Receive RSS feeds and email alerts in areas of interest.
  • Download articles in PDF or HTML format.
  • Import citations into common reference software.

View a list of e-journals here.

Posted in: Research Online


ACI Scholarly Blog Index: Research Powered by Social Media

Posted by: Amy Lewontin


Academic bloggers work hard to get new research in the sciences, engineering, the humanities and social sciences out to the world as quickly as possible.

So how do you keep up with so much interesting and important scholarly material? Try taking a look at ACI Scholarly Blog Index, a very new resource that the Northeastern University Libraries is currently beta-testing. ACI Scholarly Blog Index was created with students and faculty in mind as a tool to help you spend less time looking at irrelevant material on the web.

Looking for the best bloggers in economics, medicine, or politics? Try a search in the ACI Scholarly Blog Index. You’ll learn about the authors of the blog and what kind of academic work they are engaged in. Want to know who is writing about chemistry from a particular university?  ACI Scholarly Blog Index is also perfect for that.

All of ACI’s blogs are individually chosen by researchers with expertise in that blog’s topic or field of study.  If you are the author of a scholarly blog, and would like to suggest your blog or one your read regularly be included, there is a recommend a blog form.

You can easily create an account to search and save material you locate via ACI.  Use your Northeastern e-mail address and then create a password, of your own choosing. Why else should you try creating an account with ACI? You will see the full text of the blogs, not just an abstract.  Blog records can be downloaded and saved and your citations can be exported to Mendeley, EndNote,  or Zotero. Without logging in, the default is MLA.

Watch this helpful video for more information about logging in.

To find out more about using ACI, see the Support site here.

Let us know what you think!  Review ACI Blog Index here!



Posted in: Library News and Events, Research Online, Serendipity


NASCAR Fans and Pinterest

Posted by: Diann Smothers


I bet you, like me, have been wondering: ‘How many NASCAR fans use their tablet to follow a sport on Pinterest?’ I’m not going to tell you how many, but I will tell you this: You can find out using SBRnet. SBRnet provides market research for US sports – you can get information about fan participation, venues, teams, logo apparel, sport sponsorship, and more.

This table created by SBRNet shows the percentage of fans using Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+, Pinterest and Tumblr on their mobile devices while attending a game in 2014:


Interested in learning more? You can browse through their newsletters, or go directly to SBRnet to start exploring.


Posted in: Research Online, Serendipity