Research Online

26
Sep14

Interested in Green Design? Check out BuildingGreen Suite!

Posted by: Rebecca Bailey

Gravatar

To support Northeastern University’s emphasis on sustainability and green design, the library subscribes to BuildingGreen Suite, a collection of authoritative media and information resources relating to these topics.

The three main features of its collection are:

  • Articles from Environmental Building News
  • A searchable directory of green products
  • Case studies on individual buildings from their High Performance Buildings database.

The Environmental Building News articles include longer feature articles that deal with topics in depth, product reviews, and shorter topic overviews called “BackPage Primers.” These can be very helpful if you’re not that familiar with subject matter required for your project or assignment. For example, you could brush up on induction lighting, OLEDs, and other lighting technologies, or on acoustics and managing sound and noise within a building.

The green products directory allows you to search by the name of a specific product, or by categories of products such as Plumbing, Concrete, or Wood and Plastics. You can find out details about what a product is made of or contains, when it might be used, and why it might not be right to use in certain situations.

The case studies allow you to search for a specific building, or by location of the project or the type of building. For example, you can search for K-12 schools, or retail stores. Or you can look for projects in Massachusetts. The buildings featured in this section “may be certified green projects, or simply projects that have one or more notable environmental features.”

Be sure to check out BuildingGreen Suite if you are working on any project with a focus on green design or sustainable building practices!

Posted in: Architecture, Engineering, Environmental Studies, Research Online, Sustainability

1
Aug14

Snell Library introduces a new ebrary Reader from ProQuest on August 7!

Posted by: Amy Lewontin

Gravatar

This summer, a number of Northeastern undergraduate and graduate students volunteered their time to work with Snell Library and ProQuest as beta testers, to enhance the ebrary Reader and the user experience. We are hoping you will try out the new reader and enjoy the improved user experience!

• The interface is more simple and intuitive.
• Taking notes, printing sections of a book, sharing, zooming, searching within a book, and creating a citation have all been improved.
• Text quality is improved for better readability.
• Page numbers correspond with printed book.
• The side panel is easily removed for full screen reading.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you already have an ebrary account, your reader will be updated automatically!

A few more things:
Ebrary will be retiring their dedicated mobile app on August 4th. The new Reader was designed with mobile devices in mind. When you want to download a book, (to your laptop or tablet) you will be prompted to complete an easy three-step process. The last step is to install the free Adobe Digital Editions software for downloading whole e-books.

The Bluefire app will be used for maximizing the experience of offline reading on iOS (iPad and iPhone), Android, and Windows 8 devices. To download the Bluefire app use the App Store or Google Play.

Also, ebrary is promising “enhanced support for accessibility needs” toward the end of 2014.

Webinars are being offered on the new ebrary Reader, if you would like to learn more. We suggest the webinars on the new Reader, and on downloading if you need assistance.

If you need further assistance with ebrary and the Reader, please contact Julie Jersyk, Research and Instruction Librarian at j.jersyk@neu.edu or 617-373- 2458. You may also use our Ask A Librarian service.

Posted in: Library News and Events, Research Online

30
Jul14

New: Free Access to 400,000 Digital Images from Metropolitan Museum of Art

Posted by: Rebecca Bailey

Gravatar

Exciting news! New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art announced recently that “more than 400,000 high-resolution digital images of public domain works in the Museum’s world-renowned collection may be downloaded directly from the Museum’s website for non-commercial use—including in scholarly publications in any media—without permission from the Museum and without a fee. The number of available images will increase as new digital files are added on a regular basis.”

The Met calls this initiative Open Access for Scholarly Content (OASC). When searching their online image collection, look for the OASC icon, which designates images that are part of this initiative. These images may be used for non-commercial purposes, including school assignments, presentations, scholarly publishing, or personal projects. (Read more about the OASC policy in the FAQ.)

This decision by the Met follows a very welcome recent movement among galleries, libraries, archives, and museums (the so-called GLAM organizations) to make more of their digital image content freely available when possible. This benefits the organizations by increasing public awareness of and generating publicity for their collections. And of course it benefits all of us to have greater access to cultural content worldwide!

Here are some links to more such programs:

The initiative known as OpenGLAM, which is helping many museums to open up more of their content, has a longer list of these types of efforts on their website. You can learn more about OpenGLAM from their FAQ. And be sure to check out the amazing image collections listed above. Happy exploring!

Posted in: Architecture, Art, Information and Society, Read, Listen, Watch, Research Online

27
May14

Scholar OneSearch: New Release

Posted by: Jen Ferguson

Gravatar

Update, 6/10/2014The new version is up and running.  As of Monday June 9, you should see these changes in Scholar OneSearch.

The latest version of Scholar OneSearch will be released in early June. We’ve made several enhancements to help make it easier for you to find what you’re looking for. Here’s a taste of what we’ve been working on.

Permalinks. Each resource now includes a permalink under the ‘actions’ drop down menu. These are handy for adding persistent links to library resources in syllabi and course sites on Blackboard.

 

A date slider has replaced the date facets.  The slider gives you more control when narrowing down the publication dates of materials you seek.

More visible call numbers and a ‘find it’ feature linking to Snell Library floor maps help simplify the task of locating items in the library.

Last but not least, check out our new virtual browse!  It’s the next best thing to browsing through the library stacks.

 

Look for these features and more in next week’s release. What features would you like to see in future releases of Scholar OneSearch? Let us know!

 

Posted in: Research Online

8
Apr14

Don’t Know Where to Start? The Librarian is In.

Posted by: Julie Jersyk

Gravatar

When you are looking for reliable information to complete a paper or project, where to turn?

Snell Library has the answer – the Research Help desk.  The reference librarians there can help you make the most of your precious time by pointing out the most efficient ways of navigating through the vast sea of information to identify just the right books, articles, documents, data,  - whatever you need to produce an outstanding final product.

Whether you have a quick question or need in-depth guidance, visit the friendly and knowledgeable people at the Research Help desk.  The desk is located in the room next to the Help and Information desk on Snell Library’s first floor.

After hours, see the options at Ask a Librarian. Good luck on all your finals!

 

Posted in: Library News and Events, Research Online