Research Online

19
Dec13

ClinicalKey with Expanded Content Replaces MD Consult Effective January 1, 2014

Posted by: Sandy Dunphy

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Elsevier’s ClinicalKey will replace its older MD Consult resource beginning January 1, 2014. You will be able to find links to ClinicalKey from all of the same places you now can find MD Consult (the library’s A to Z index, Books & E-Books, and the Biomedical and Health subject guides).

ClinicalKey brings together greatly expanded content, including hundreds of additional e-books, e-journals, practice guidelines, videos, and images.

ClinicalKey includes the following expanded features:

  • single search interface across resources
  • 900+ top medical books in medicine and surgery
  • 500+ medical journals
  • 15,000 medical & surgical videos
  • 15,000 patient education handouts
  • 2,800 drug monographs from Gold Standard
  • 800+ First Consult point-of-care clinical monographs that assist with complex cases
  • more than 5 million images
  • 4,000 practice guidelines


Take a video guided tour of ClinicalKey now!

Posted in: Health Sciences, Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Toxicology, Research Online

9
Dec13

New Release: Scholar OneSearch

Posted by: Jen Ferguson

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With the latest version of Scholar OneSearch you may notice some minor changes to look and feel, but here’s the big news: thanks to your feedback, we’ve implemented the ability to pass search terms seamlessly to WorldCat. This is a useful feature for broadening your search to include holdings in libraries at other institutions.

Here’s how it works.

In the example below, I’ve entered some search terms into Scholar OneSearch, but I haven’t yet clicked the Search button.

 

 

After I run the search, the ‘Search WorldCat’ option appears.

 

 

Clicking ‘Search WorldCat’ sends all the terms already in the search box directly to WorldCat.  The results look like this:

 

 

From this page, I see that Northeastern owns copies of the first two items, but not the third item. I can click on the titles to learn more about these items, and from there I can even place an interlibrary loan request for the book we don’t own.

We know that some of you prefer to locate materials by ISBN or ISSN. Good news — the new WorldCat feature can search these too.

Here I’ve searched Scholar OneSearch for ISBN 9781892384157, with 0 results. (This is not too surprising, as Northeastern doesn’t own a copy of this book).

 

 

But once I pass that search to WorldCat, I can find the book — and I have the option to request it via interlibrary loan!

 

 

What do you think of the new release of Scholar OneSearch? What features would you like to see in future releases? Let us know!

Posted in: Library News and Events, Research Online

5
Dec13

Looking for Statistics?

Posted by: Julie Jersyk

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“ …Lies, damned lies, and statistics.” So the saying goes. But used carefully, statistics can be powerful allies in backing up an assertion or strengthening an argument. With that in mind, the library’s social sciences team has created a Guide to Social Science Statistics. The guide points the way to facts and figures collected by government, commercial and private entities arranged under topics such as demographics, health, business/economics, education, sports, energy/environment and more. The guide strives to include all major sources of statistical information, but if you don’t find the number you are looking for, ask a librarian.

Posted in: Research Online

15
Nov13

Google Wins Fair Use Argument in Book Search Lawsuit

Posted by: Hillary Corbett

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On Thursday, November 14, 2013, eight years after the Authors Guild sued that Google Book Search violated the rights of authors, Judge Denny Chin finally handed down his decision (PDF) on the lawsuit. The Internet giant’s project to scan millions of books held by academic libraries was found to “[advance] the progress of the arts and sciences, while maintaining respectful consideration for the rights of authors and other creative individuals, and without adversely impacting the rights of copyright holders.”

Advocates of fair use are applauding Judge Chin’s decision. Brandon Butler, formerly Director of Public Policy Initiatives at the Association of Research Libraries (and a co-facilitator in the development of the ARL’s Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries), calls the decision “a powerful affirmation of the value of research libraries.” The Library Copyright Alliance, which last year issued an amicus brief in the case, quoted leaders of library organizations in a press release issued yesterday:

“ALA applauds the decision to dismiss the long running Google Books case. This ruling furthers the purpose of copyright by recognizing that Google’s Book search is a transformative fair use that advances research and learning.” – Barbara Stripling, president of the American Library Association
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“This decision, along with the decision by Judge Baer in Authors Guild v. HathiTrust, makes clear that fair use permits mass digitization of books for purposes that advance the arts and sciences, such as search, preservation, and access for the print-disabled.” – Carol Pitts Diedrichs, president of the Association of Research Libraries
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“I echo the comments of my colleagues that this ruling, that strongly supports fair use principles, enables the discovery of a wealth of resources by researchers and scholars. Google Book search also makes searchable literally millions of books by students and others with visual disabilities. This is a tremendous opportunity for all our communities.” – Trevor A. Dawes, president of the Association of College & Research Libraries

Inevitably, the Authors Guild has already announced its plan to appeal the decision. And some critics, while perhaps not siding with the Authors Guild, have questioned Google’s motives in embarking on the project – readers’ privacy is uncertain, for example. Google has also been criticized for providing low-quality or sometimes just incorrect metadata for the books it has scanned. But having access to such an enormous textual corpus, despite its flaws, is a boon for researchers working in the field of natural language processing — Brandon Butler lauds the decision as “a victory…for transformative, non-consumptive search” — as well as for the visually disabled.

Posted in: Information and Society, Research Online, Scholarly Communications

23
Oct13

IRis, Northeastern’s Digital Archive, Reaches Milestone: 1 Million Downloads!

Posted by: Hillary Corbett

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When the Northeastern University Libraries launched IRis in 2006, the idea of an “institutional repository” was still fairly new. Universities were starting repositories to share their intellectual and administrative output – faculty-authored articles, dissertations and theses, student-run publications, university-created reports, and other documents. Seven years later, many more colleges and universities around the world have digital repositories of open access materials created by their faculty, students, and staff. These repositories often also host open-access journals and other publications – at Northeastern, IRis has hosted the Annals of Environmental Science since 2007, and also provides access to faculty-authored and -edited books.

IRis began with only a few collections in 2006, but has grown exponentially since then. Today, IRis contains over 6,000 items, and as of Tuesday, October 15, 2013, these items have been downloaded one million times!

Although it’s not possible to determine which one item received the lucky one-millionth download, we know that on that day, 649 items were downloaded 1147 times. Here’s a breakdown of the types of materials downloaded that day:

Here are top downloads in each category, for October 15, 2013:

As you can see, slightly more than half of the items downloaded were dissertations or master’s theses. An important contributor to the growth of IRis has been the university’s transition to an Electronic Thesis and Dissertation (ETD) program in the 2007-2008 academic year – instead of depositing print copies of dissertations and master’s theses in the library’s archives, graduate students now submit their ETDs to ProQuest and an open-access copy is made available through IRis. Both undergraduate and graduate research output is very popular in IRis – in fact, almost every month our most highly accessed collection is the Honors Junior/Senior Projects!

In the coming months, we will be expanding on the success of IRis with DRS – Northeastern University’s Digital Repository Service. The DRS will offer even more functionality for users and depositors, such as more flexible sharing options, the ability to manage permissions, and options for curated and noncurated collections.

Posted in: Library News and Events, Research Online, Scholarly Communications, Serendipity