Research Guides by Subject

24
Aug15

Professor of History Gerry Herman Retires After 50 Years at Northeastern

Posted by: Andrew Begley

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Just try to name a University committee that Gerry Herman hasn’t been involved with over the past half-century. Handbooks and contracts? He reviewed them. Strategic Plans? He helped plan them. Technology and distance learning initiatives? He championed them.

Herman first called Northeastern home as a graduate student in 1965. Since then, he has been on the cutting edge of  incorporating media into the  study and teaching of history. He taught courses on topics ranging from Western and World History to the History of Flight and Space Travel. Herman has given new meaning to the term “University Service,” serving as University Copyright Officer (1988-2012), Special Assistant to the Provost (1979-1987), and Special Assistant to University Counsel (1987-2012) in addition to chairing a host of committees and task forces. Herman has also been integral to the success of Holocaust Remembrance Week, serving on the Holocaust Awareness Committee from 1983-2013. Professor Herman retired from the University on July 1, 2015, but his impact will surely be felt for many years to come.

Herman’s professional papers and records (the Gerald H. Herman Papers) are preserved in the Archives and Special Collections Department in Snell Library.

 

Herman teaching an honors seminar in 1984.

Professor Herman in 1975.

Herman and President Richard Freeland at the inaugural NUTV broadcast, April 1997.


Posted in: Archives and Special Collections, History, Serendipity

25
Mar15

Language learning program trials: Try both out and let us know!

Posted by: Andrew Gaudio

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Looking to learn a new language, or brush up on one you are already familiar with? Snell Library has trials to two language learning programs: Mango Languages and Pronunciator. (Log-in information below.) Mango’s trial ends on April 16 and Pronunciator’s ends on April 10. Try them out while you can!

Both programs offer similar features such as:

  • Key phrases and expressions in the target language
  • Narration by native speakers to show you how to pronounce each word
  • Cultural bits of information which help you get a sense of proper etiquette in the country where the language you are learning is spoken
  • Media in the form of radio broadcasts and films with subtitles to help you with your listening comprehension
  • Media can be played back at varying speeds to suit your level of comprehension
  • Exercises and quizzes to see what you have learned
  • Mango offers 63 languages, Prounciator offers 80

Now for the differences:

  • Pronunciator allows you to select any language as your source language and any language as your target language. If you choose German as your source language and Thai as your target language, you would be learning Thai with instruction in German.
  • Mango does not have mix and match capabilities, but it does offer English courses for non-English speakers of Polish, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Vietnamese, Turkish, Greek, Russian, Armenian, Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.
  • Pronunciator will match the pitches of different vowels of words to music notes so you can hear the differing tones of different vowel sounds.
  • Pronunciator gives you the option of playing only the voice, the notes, or both the voice and notes.

 

Screenshot from Pronunciator’s Vietnamese course.

 

  • With Pronunciator’s writing tool, the narrator speaks a word or phrase in the target language, and you can write the word and insert vowels with diacritics using the virtual keyboard.
  • Pronunciator takes accurate diacritic marks into account. Red letters indicate that the diacritics are either incorrect or missing.

 

Screenshot of Pronunciator’s writing tool.

 

  • Mango color codes parts of speech in both languages to show the user which parts of speech in the language being learned correspond with those in the user’s native language.

 

Screenshot from Mango matching English words to Vietnamese words.

 

Pronunciator and Mango have apps available for mobile devices including iOS and Android devices: Pronunciator apps | Mango apps

 

The URL for the free trials are:

Pronunciator: learning.pronunciator.com/ne.php

Log in: ne

Password ne

Mango:connect.mangolanguages.com/northeastern-university-trial/try/f814b6af0

 

Try out both and let us know what you think!

 

 

Posted in: Foreign Languages and Literatures, Serendipity

16
Mar15

Snell is full of Fanjimiles

Posted by: Emily Nehme

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Hey aspiring musicians! Check out the colorful and moving music of Anjimile and read about their journey on recording and releasing Human Nature, their new album inspired by the wonders of the human body, mind, and soul. Human Nature was written, recorded, and produced by these band members, who also happen to be Northeastern students: Anjimile Yvonne on vocals and guitar, Drew Wilcox on percussion, Jason Smith as a featured bass guitarist, and Lee Schuna who produced this album at The Ivy Basement

Here’s the deal: Anjimile, an indie band from Boston, is raising money for their first ever full-length album, Human Nature. It’s always been their dream to release a a full-fledged studio album, but now they need the help of fellow musicians, indie fans, kind-hearted souls… anyone, really, to fund a campaign with this pre-sale. In return, you’ll get a digital version of Human Nature and the chance to call yourself a true “Fanjimile”.

So, what does this have to do with the library?

Human Nature
 has musical features that were recorded in the Digital Media Commons (DMC) Audio Recording Studio at Snell Library.

Anjimile shared their recording experience with us and said they enjoyed the environment of the studio and felt comfortable recording there. The state-of-the-art equipment eased the recording process and the studio was always readily available to them when they made appointments.

Let’s think about why the DMC met the needs of Anjimile and how it can meet your needs:

  • Anjimile has an in-home studio where the majority of their album was recorded. However, acquiring equipment and soundproofing the space requires spending a lot of time and a lot of money, which not everyone can do.
  • Another option would be renting studio space somewhere in the city… yeah, right! Again, that requires a lot of time and a lot of money.
  • Finally, Northeastern does offer another audio recording studio in Shillman. Unfortunately, it’s only for music majors.

It’s a no-brainer! The DMC Audio Recording Studio is free, easy to book, and available to any student, faculty, or staff member at Northeastern. Book now and record or edit your own soundtrack! Or if you don’t have experience but are interested, check out the Audio Recording Workshop Series in April.

In the meantime, show your support: help Anjimile raise money for their new album and check out their next show on March 21st at 8 pm at NU afterHOURS where they will be performing with Massachusetts-based, nationally renowned indie band Speedy Ortiz.

Posted in: Digital Media Design Studio (DMDS), Music

13
Feb15

New collection: JoVE Science Education videos

Posted by: Jen Ferguson

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Hey science students!  We’ve subscribed to a new resource to help you with your lab courses.  Check out the JoVE Science Education Database to watch experts perform lab techniques before starting your own experiments.

 

 

Northeastern affiliates now have access to these collections:

  • Essentials of Neuroscience – including videos on tissue staining, water mazes, patch clamp electrophysiology, fMRI, and neuroanatomy

 

Here’s a sample of the videos the JoVE Science Education Database has to offer:  Making Solutions in the Laboratory

 

We hope you find these video collections useful in your work.  Let us know what you think of them!

 

Posted in: Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Read, Listen, Watch, Research Online

26
Jan15

American Composers Forum New England Records Now Available for Research

Posted by: Andrew Begley

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The records of the New England chapter of the American Composers Forum (ACFNE) are now available for research in the Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections.

The collection documents the role of ACFNE in promoting local composers and their music, and includes administrative records for the organization, as well as scores and recordings of original compositions. The collection also provides some interesting intersections with the Archives’ existing social justice collections. During the late 1990’s and early 2000’s, ACFNE’s Community Partners Program provided funding to place composers in diverse non-musical community settings in the Boston area, with the goal of integrating community participants in the making, playing and enjoyment of new music. Program participants in the Boston area included City Year, Casa Myrna Vasquez, and Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A flier for “Know the Ledge: An Expression of Afro-Caribbean Culture Through Hip-Hop,” sponsored by Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción and ACFNE.

 

 

Posted in: Archives and Special Collections, Music