Research Guides by Subject

11
Oct12

All Shakespeare, All the Time!

Posted by: Amanda Rust

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Watch the entire BBC Shakespeare Collection in the comfort of your own home, dorm, or subway seat! We’re very excited to now own the entire BBC Shakespeare collection available online, through streaming video.

These productions include some of Britain’s most distinguished performers, and productions range from quite traditional to more adventurous:

View the plays in their entirety, or link to specific Acts for teaching and presentation.  You can also turn Closed Captioning on or off with a single click — an excellent way to see the specifics of Shakespeare’s language unfold before your eyes. We also have the entire collection on DVD, so tell us what you think.

Posted in: English and American Literature, Read, Listen, Watch, Research Online, Theater

2
Oct12

New Resource for Students and Practitioners in Counseling, School Psychology, Psychiatric Nursing, and More!

Posted by: Katherine Herrlich

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Counseling and Therapy in Video Volume 1  from Alexander Street Press (current NU only) is now available.

This valuable resource includes over 400 hours of training videos, reenactments, and real-life therapy sessions. Counseling and Therapy in Video Volume 1 is a great tool for counselors-in-training, as it allows one to observe, in face-to-face sessions, subtleties of body language, facial expressions, behavior, speech patterns and intonation.

Some of the perks: every video includes a synchronized transcript. Users can create, edit, and share playlists or clips. Videos are searchable by keywords and subjects, and arranged by easy-to-browse topical subject areas and therapeutic methods.

For example, you could search for Gestalt, Solution Focused, or Family Therapy sessions. You could search for clips where a client diagnosed with depression uses the word drink.  Or you could compare and contrast how cognitive-behavioral therapists and client-centered therapists treat a similar condition.

You can browse all titles or search by subject or therapy type.

This resource is listed on the A-Z Index (under the FIND menu) and on my psychology subject guide. The subject guide includes my contact information– I am interested to hear your comments and questions about this new acquisition.

Posted in: Education, Health Sciences, Library News and Events, Psychology, Read, Listen, Watch, Research Online, Serendipity

24
Aug12

New resource: Oxford Bibliographies

Posted by: Christine Oka

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The Northeastern University Libraries presents Oxford Bibliographies in six subject areas: Atlantic History, Cinema and Media Studies, Criminology, Islamic Studies, Sociology, and Victorian Literature.

Developed cooperatively with scholars and librarians, each bibliography provides authoritative research guidance with a large collection of articles addressing major themes and topics within a discipline, with commentary and selective, annotated bibliography. The articles cite resources in many formats: books, along with more recent online sources, such as digital archives, datasets, electronic encyclopedias, and more. Output options for saving, annotating and sharing citations and searches are available with each article.

The Oxford Bibliographies provide access to important themes and topics in a field of study or discipline for scholars, researchers, and students. Have a look and see how they might help you in your research!

 

Posted in: African-American Studies, Cinema Studies, Criminal Justice, English and American Literature, History, Library News and Events, Sociology

15
May12

Sports Is Big Business; SBRnet Tells You How Big

Posted by: Rebecca Bailey

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Here we are, a month into baseball season, and my beloved Red Sox are showing few signs of emerging from their prolonged slump. Yet they still (so far, anyway!) are maintaining the longest sold-out-games streak in history. Want to check their attendance numbers versus those of other MLB teams? SBRnet can do that.

Brave enough to bike around Boston? (Not me, thanks.) That has the potential to be an expensive hobby. How much do US consumers spend annually on their bicycling habits? SBRnet’s got that information as well.

Maybe you want to advertise a product to female TV viewers of sporting events. But which sports do women watch on television the most? SBRnet can link you to TV Viewing Profiles for all televised sports.

SBRnet is a great tool for sport marketing and business information. It includes statistical data, news, research, and reports on topics such as sport participation, fan profiles, sports facilities, sport finance, sporting goods, sponsorship, marketing, and media.

If you are interested in the business of sports, take a moment to poke around in SBRnet. And as always, let us know what you think, either in the comments below or by contacting us here.

Posted in: Business, Economics, Research Online, Sports and Recreation

2
May12

Celebrate May Day!

Posted by: G. Karen Merguerian

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Let’s celebrate labor!

Yesterday was May Day, internationally celebrated as a day of recognition for labor and the working class.

To learn about labor and labor history, you probably know to search NUCat for books and other items in our collection, and use our library home page discovery search box to add journal articles to your search.  In addition, here are some other, perhaps lesser-known, collections and items related to labor that we have to offer in the NU Libraries.

You may have heard references in the media to Northeastern’s Center for Labor Market Studies, an applied research unit that focuses on employment and unemployment in New England and nationwide.  Center for Labor Market Studies reports are collected and published in IRis, Northeastern’s digital archive of university scholarship.

Coop student files papers, circa 1940. Courtesy of NU Archives and Special Collections

The Archives and Special Collections help you go back in time to learn about the history of labor and labor relations in Boston. Their unique documents include Gay and Lesbian Labor Activists Network records from 1987-2001, which illustrate that organization’s campaigns against homophobia in the labor movement, and their support for benefits for domestic partners and nondiscrimination.

Our Archives and Special Collections also help you learn about labor history and union advocacy in Boston’s immigrant community organizations, such as the Chinese Progressive Association and El Colectivo Puertoriqueño de Boston.

The Women’s Institute for Leadership Development (WILD) is another advocacy organization, started in 1986 to promote women leaders in the Massachusetts labor movement; their records, including photographs, negatives and slides, are also available in our Archives and Special Collections.

For the most up-to-date information about labor, try our research databases. Factiva (with Wall Street Journal articles) and Lexis-Nexis help you find up-to-date news, while Business Source Complete and EconLit have scholarship and research articles. For a country-by-country view of labor practices, try EIU Country Reports.

Don’t forget that the library has videos!  1-800-INDIA: Importing a White-Collar Economy, available streaming, is a great example–a fascinating look at how outsourced white-collar jobs have affected family relations, urban landscapes, women’s lives, labor practices, and economic development in India.

Courtesy Smithsonian Global Sound

Finally, celebrate May 1 by listening to some old-time labor songs. Here’s labor organizer Florence Reese, followed by Pete Seeger and the Almanac Singers, with the heartfelt “Which Side Are You On?” from the album Classic Labor Songs (Smithsonian Folkways).

Posted in: Business, History, Read, Listen, Watch, Serendipity