History

6
Oct17

Now’s Your Chance to Meet the Press!

Posted by: Brooke Williams

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Eleanor Roosevelt is seated at a table on the Meet the Press set. She is smiling at a man standing behind her. Host Ned Brooks is seated next to them.

September 16, 1956: Eleanor Roosevelt is seated at a table on the Meet the Press set in New York City. She is smiling at a man standing behind her. Host Ned Brooks is seated next to them.

Meet the Press has been on television longer than any other program in history. The show premiered in 1947, and it’s been a cornerstone of the American cultural and political landscape ever since. It’s the first show to ever conduct a live interview via satellite (in 1965, with British Prime Minister Harold Wilson) and the first live network news show to ever host a sitting president (Gerald Ford, in 1975). Since Ford, every American president has dropped by Meet the Press at least once.

Now, all of this history, much of which has been unseen since its original television broadcast, is just a few clicks away. Over the summer, Snell Library acquired access to the full surviving run of Meet the Press, from 1947 to today, through Alexander Street Press. That’s almost 1500 hours—or 62.5 days—of video available to you for free, dating back to 1957. You can watch Eleanor Roosevelt talk politics in the 1950s; see Martin Luther King, Jr. discuss the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s; hear Dan Rostenkowski describe Reaganomics in the 1980s; or watch Ross Perot’s presidential campaign unfold in the 1990s. Many episodes include detailed transcripts and closed captioning.

Meet the Press is available from our A-Z Databases list. You can also click here for direct access. If you are off campus, you may be asked to sign in with your NEU ID and password.

Posted in: Communication Studies, Economics, History, Information and Society, Journalism and International Affairs, Online Collections, Political Science, Read, Listen, Watch, Serendipity, Sociology

24
Aug15

Professor of History Gerry Herman Retires After 50 Years at Northeastern

Posted by: Andrew Begley

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Just try to name a University committee that Gerry Herman hasn’t been involved with over the past half-century. Handbooks and contracts? He reviewed them. Strategic Plans? He helped plan them. Technology and distance learning initiatives? He championed them.

Herman first called Northeastern home as a graduate student in 1965. Since then, he has been on the cutting edge of  incorporating media into the  study and teaching of history. He taught courses on topics ranging from Western and World History to the History of Flight and Space Travel. Herman has given new meaning to the term “University Service,” serving as University Copyright Officer (1988-2012), Special Assistant to the Provost (1979-1987), and Special Assistant to University Counsel (1987-2012) in addition to chairing a host of committees and task forces. Herman has also been integral to the success of Holocaust Remembrance Week, serving on the Holocaust Awareness Committee from 1983-2013. Professor Herman retired from the University on July 1, 2015, but his impact will surely be felt for many years to come.

Herman’s professional papers and records (the Gerald H. Herman Papers) are preserved in the Archives and Special Collections Department in Snell Library.

 

Herman teaching an honors seminar in 1984.

Professor Herman in 1975.

Herman and President Richard Freeland at the inaugural NUTV broadcast, April 1997.


Posted in: Archives and Special Collections, History, Serendipity

19
Nov14

Our Marathon: The Boston Bombing Digital Archive – WBUR Oral History Project Announces Lesson Plans

Posted by: Claudia Willett

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In the wake of the events that occurred on April 15, 2013 at the 117th Boston Marathon and on April 19, 2013 in Watertown, Northeastern University English Professor Elizabeth Maddock Dillon and Assistant Professor Ryan Cordell recognized the obvious need for a space where people could tell and share their stories with each other.  They believed that sharing stories from survivors, families, witnesses, visitors to the city, and everyone around the world touched by the event will speed the healing process, and wanted to create that space as a gift to the community.

Together, they established the Our Marathon: The Boston Bombing Digital Archive, a crowd-sourced, digital archive of pictures, videos, stories, and social media related to the Boston Marathon bombing.  Thus far, they have acquired an archive of almost 10,000 items, 3 interactive exhibits, and 3 major collections.

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[April 21, 2013, from the Public Submissions collection]

This summer, I contributed to this remarkable endeavor as a Simmons School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) graduate summer intern sponsored by the Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections Department and supported by the Project Co-Director James McGrath. In addition to exhibit building and social media, the main task of my internship was to create lesson plans for schoolroom use.

Because children were affected by this crisis as well, the team at Our Marathon thought it would help the healing process for children to use the Our Marathon archives—to remember and share stories in the safety of their own classrooms.  Additionally, it can be difficult for teachers to navigate the complex questions young students ask and a resource like the digital archive can work as a great tool to facilitate age appropriate discussion.

To that end, I helped create a Teaching Resources page for Our Marathon. This page showcases five lesson plans for Kindergarten through Grade 12 that utilize Letters to the City of Boston and The Copley Square Memorial collections,  and the WBUR Oral History Project as the basis for a teaching unit. These lesson plans are designed to demonstrate mastery of grade and subject appropriate Common Core Standards.

Hopefully, these assignments will generate more student submissions to the archive as well as create a platform for an important dialogue amongst students and teachers. I look forward to reading about their experiences in the Our Marathon archives.

Posted in: Archives and Special Collections, History, Information and Society, Library News and Events, Read, Listen, Watch, Research Online

15
Nov12

Free Admission to Touch History

Posted by: Michelle Romero

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The Annual International Antiquarian Book Fair is coming to Boston this weekend, November 16th-18th, at the Hynes Convention Center.  The 3-day event offers visitors an exciting opportunity to view, handle, and purchase rare books, manuscripts, and collectibles, including a signed photograph by John F. Kennedy, a first edition of The History of Mr. Polly by H.G. Wells (1910), and Miles Davis’ autographed musical manuscript.  The event will also include seminars and panel discussions.

On Sunday, November 18th, all students with a student ID will have free admission.  Be sure to bring your books, free appraisals will be available Sunday from 1-3PM.

For more information, please visit the Book Fair website: http://bostonbookfair.com/

Posted in: Archives and Special Collections, Cinema Studies, English and American Literature, History, Music

24
Aug12

New resource: Oxford Bibliographies

Posted by: Christine Oka

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The Northeastern University Libraries presents Oxford Bibliographies in six subject areas: Atlantic History, Cinema and Media Studies, Criminology, Islamic Studies, Sociology, and Victorian Literature.

Developed cooperatively with scholars and librarians, each bibliography provides authoritative research guidance with a large collection of articles addressing major themes and topics within a discipline, with commentary and selective, annotated bibliography. The articles cite resources in many formats: books, along with more recent online sources, such as digital archives, datasets, electronic encyclopedias, and more. Output options for saving, annotating and sharing citations and searches are available with each article.

The Oxford Bibliographies provide access to important themes and topics in a field of study or discipline for scholars, researchers, and students. Have a look and see how they might help you in your research!

 

Posted in: African-American Studies, Cinema Studies, Criminal Justice, English and American Literature, History, Library News and Events, Sociology