Art

21
Feb17

Fair Use and the Arts: Collage-Making at Snell Library

Posted by: Hillary Corbett

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February 20-24 is Fair Use Week, and this year Snell Library is focusing on the arts. Come and make a collage with us…details below!

What is fair use? It’s a right granted to us that allows us to use copyrighted materials without permission from the copyright holder, under certain circumstances. The central purpose of the doctrine of fair use is to encourage creative expression and innovation through the transformative use of intellectual property. It is part of U.S. copyright law.

People often ask, “how much of someone else’s work can I use without asking permission and have it be considered fair use?” The answer is “it depends.” Fairness is something that needs to be assessed for each potential usage, against four factors:

  1. The intended purpose and character of the use, such as whether it’s for commercial or noncommercial, educational use.
  2. The nature of the copyrighted work – is it factual or creative?
  3. The amount of the portion to be used in relation to the entire work.
  4. The effect of the use on the potential market for the original work.

There’s also a concept of “transformativeness,” which, while not specifically codified in copyright law, has been shown to be a favored use. Transformativeness has to do with the creation of a new work through the use of others’ work. Recording artists and visual artists use remixing, mashups, and sampling in this way. Sometimes they need to ask permission, but sometimes appropriation of others’ work is considered fair use, and the courts agree:

Make a Collage and Learn More About Fair Use!

Creativity can be a great way to think about how fair use can apply in your research output and other work. Our Art and Architecture librarian, Regina Pagani, and I will be hosting a collage table in the lobby of Snell Library on Thursday and Friday this week (2/23 and 2/24), from 2:00 to 4:00. Stop by and find out more about fair use, and make your own collage to take with you or contribute to a larger collaborative effort!

Further Reading:

Posted in: Art, Library News and Events, Serendipity

30
Jul14

New: Free Access to 400,000 Digital Images from Metropolitan Museum of Art

Posted by: Rebecca Bailey

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Exciting news! New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art announced recently that “more than 400,000 high-resolution digital images of public domain works in the Museum’s world-renowned collection may be downloaded directly from the Museum’s website for non-commercial use—including in scholarly publications in any media—without permission from the Museum and without a fee. The number of available images will increase as new digital files are added on a regular basis.”

The Met calls this initiative Open Access for Scholarly Content (OASC). When searching their online image collection, look for the OASC icon, which designates images that are part of this initiative. These images may be used for non-commercial purposes, including school assignments, presentations, scholarly publishing, or personal projects. (Read more about the OASC policy in the FAQ.)

This decision by the Met follows a very welcome recent movement among galleries, libraries, archives, and museums (the so-called GLAM organizations) to make more of their digital image content freely available when possible. This benefits the organizations by increasing public awareness of and generating publicity for their collections. And of course it benefits all of us to have greater access to cultural content worldwide!

Here are some links to more such programs:

The initiative known as OpenGLAM, which is helping many museums to open up more of their content, has a longer list of these types of efforts on their website. You can learn more about OpenGLAM from their FAQ. And be sure to check out the amazing image collections listed above. Happy exploring!

Posted in: Architecture, Art, Information and Society, Read, Listen, Watch, Research Online

12
Mar12

Not Sure Where to Start? New in Arts & Humanities Reference Overviews from SAGE

Posted by: Amanda Rust

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Encyclopedias and handbooks provide excellent ways to get an overview and start your research project. (Think of how you use this encyclopedia, probably every day.) To help give context to large research questions, the Library has just purchased a collection of encyclopedias and handbooks from SAGE Reference. You’ll find answers to questions like:

You can search or browse the SAGE Reference collection, and find more resources through our Arts and Humanities subject guides. If you have any comments, let us know here or via email.

Posted in: Anthropology, Art, Business, Cinema Studies, Communication Studies, Criminal Justice, Education, English and American Literature, Foreign Languages and Literatures, History, Music, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Read, Listen, Watch, Religion, Research Online, Serendipity, Sociology, Sports and Recreation, Theater, Women's Studies

17
Nov11

2012 Media Showcase: Call for Submissions

Posted by: Jonathan Iannone

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The Digital Media Design Studio is once again calling for the submission of media projects highlighting this year’s theme, which is “Going Green” (Sustainability).

Here is the link to the flyer with contact information and submission requirements:

DMDS media showcase flyer (PDF)

We look forward to seeing everyone’s work.

Posted in: Art, Environmental Studies, Information and Society, Library News and Events, Serendipity

26
Sep11

Extended back files of Web of Science now available

Posted by: Jamie Dendy

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An article on a revision of the US Government’s socio-economic index, published in 1982 in the journal, Social Science Research, has been cited by other articles in a broad array of academic journals over 300 times, with the most recent citation being from an article published in June 2011. By extending our offering of Web of Science back files from 1975 through 1992, we are able to provide Northeastern researchers with these historical statistics, allowing them to identify the most important articles, journals, institutions, and authors in their field or subject area of study.

When viewing any article in the Web of Science database, a list of citations from that article are provided as well as a list of other subsequent articles and conference proceedings that cite the original article. Links connect to the full text of the cited articles when the full text is available. And don’t be fooled by the title of this database.  As the above example illustrates, Web of Science covers scholarly articles in all types of sciences that include journals in the humanities and social sciences.

Visit our News & Events page to read more about this collection or visit our full listing of online databases and trials.

Posted in: African-American Studies, American Sign Language, Anthropology, Architecture, Art, Biology, Business, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Cinema Studies, Communication Studies, Computer and Information Science, Criminal Justice, Earth Sciences, Economics, Education, Engineering, English and American Literature, English as a Second Language, Environmental Studies, Foreign Languages and Literatures, Health Sciences, History, Journalism and International Affairs, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Library News and Events, Marine Science, Mathematics, Music, Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Toxicology, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Religion, Research Guides by Subject, Research Online, Scholarly Communications, Serendipity, Sociology, Sports and Recreation, Theater, Women's Studies