Neurology: Now full-text online, 1951-present

Posted by: Jen Ferguson


We’ve expanded our subscription to the journal Neurology. Accessed nearly 1,000 times by Northeastern users in the past year alone, NU faculty, staff, and students now have full-text online access to all Neurology issues from 1951-present.

Neurology is the official journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The journal aims to advance the field of neurology by presenting new basic and clinical research with emphasis on knowledge that will influence the way neurology is practiced.

Neurology content includes:

  • Articles
  • Clinical/Scientific notes
  • Views & Reviews (including Medical Hypothesis papers)
  • Issues of Neurological Practice
  • Historical Neurology
  • NeuroImages
  • Humanities
  • WriteClick® Editor’s Choice
  • Position papers from the American Academy of Neurology
  • Resident and Fellow section
  • Patient Page
  • CME Quizzes
  • Podcasts
  • Supplementary data (including video) for specific articles

Posted in: Biology, Collections, Health Sciences, Online Collections, Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Toxicology, Psychology, Research Online, Serendipity


New collection: JoVE Science Education videos

Posted by: Jen Ferguson


Hey science students!  We’ve subscribed to a new resource to help you with your lab courses.  Check out the JoVE Science Education Database to watch experts perform lab techniques before starting your own experiments.



Northeastern affiliates now have access to these collections:

  • Essentials of Neuroscience – including videos on tissue staining, water mazes, patch clamp electrophysiology, fMRI, and neuroanatomy


Here’s a sample of the videos the JoVE Science Education Database has to offer:  Making Solutions in the Laboratory


We hope you find these video collections useful in your work.  Let us know what you think of them!


Posted in: Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Read, Listen, Watch, Research Online


Codebreakers: Makers of Modern Genetics

Posted by: Jen Ferguson


Heredity charts I-VI: published for the Eugenics Society by George Philip & Son Ltd.

Image courtesy the Wellcome Library

Codebreakers:  Makers of Modern Genetics is a newly-launched treasure trove for fans of science, history, and of course, the history of science!

The Wellcome Library has digitized the papers of key players in genetics from the last century and made them freely available online. Works of CrickWatsonFranklinWilkins, and Haldane are all represented, to name a few. The papers include lab notebooks, sketches, articles, drafts and general correspondence. The site also contains items from the archive of the Eugenics Society, including the heredity chart shown above. In addition to these digitized artifacts, the site features digitized books and a great interactive timeline on the history of genetics.

Posted in: Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Health Sciences, Read, Listen, Watch, Research Online


Onward and upward with SpringerLink

Posted by: G. Karen Merguerian


It’s 6am on a cold November morning, and I know I’m not the only one awake.  As I am writing this, a few Northeastern researchers are online with me, and are currently reading:

*A book chapter about the semantic web
*An article about arterial fibrillation
*An article about human trafficking

How do I know this?  Because Springer, the venerable German publisher of chiefly scientific research, has recently updated its SpringerLink web site.

The content on the new site is the same solid high-quality research they’ve always had, searchable and easily linkable, with full text PDFs available DRM-free, even for ebook chapters, to NU affiliates.

But the new site has this “Recent Activity” feature.  It’s anonymous, but anyone, including you, can see a little window into what’s being read on SpringerLink at Northeastern right now.  More importantly, the new SpringerLink site has a cleaned-up layout and style that displays better in a variety of browsers.  The search results page now shows results at the individual book chapter level, with a “look inside” feature for content not licensed by our library that you may want to purchase.  The “advanced search” has been revamped and is easier to use.

We do have a warning about the new site: If you’ve been a “power user” of Springer Link in the past, you may have set up a “My Account” feature to save your searches, tag your results, and keep a history of any personal orders. Please be aware that your “My Account” on the old SpringerLink will NOT be migrated to the new site. (Unfortunately Springer claims that privacy rules prohibit them from notifying account-holders individually.) You’ll have to set up a new account on the new site and start all over.  The new “My Account” also allows you to log in from anywhere, not just through the NU Libraries.

Currently both the old and the new Springer Link sites are available, so “My Account” users should log in over the Thanksgiving break and save what’s in your old account. Beginning sometime Monday morning, 11/26, you’ll be redirected to the new site and the old site and old account information will no longer be available.

So give the new Springer Link a test drive. Have fun seeing the “Recent Activity” of researchers at NU. I just checked, and it’s now a book about genetically modified plants and an article about Harry Potter from an education journal. I’m sure when you log in it will be something completely different!

Posted in: Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Computer and Information Science, Earth Sciences, Economics, Engineering, Environmental Studies, Health Sciences, Marine Science, Mathematics, Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Toxicology, Physics, Research Online


Extended back files of Web of Science now available

Posted by: Jamie Dendy


An article on a revision of the US Government’s socio-economic index, published in 1982 in the journal, Social Science Research, has been cited by other articles in a broad array of academic journals over 300 times, with the most recent citation being from an article published in June 2011. By extending our offering of Web of Science back files from 1975 through 1992, we are able to provide Northeastern researchers with these historical statistics, allowing them to identify the most important articles, journals, institutions, and authors in their field or subject area of study.

When viewing any article in the Web of Science database, a list of citations from that article are provided as well as a list of other subsequent articles and conference proceedings that cite the original article. Links connect to the full text of the cited articles when the full text is available. And don’t be fooled by the title of this database.  As the above example illustrates, Web of Science covers scholarly articles in all types of sciences that include journals in the humanities and social sciences.

Visit our News & Events page to read more about this collection or visit our full listing of online databases and trials.

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