Criminal Justice

24
Aug12

New resource: Oxford Bibliographies

Posted by: Christine Oka

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The Northeastern University Libraries presents Oxford Bibliographies in six subject areas: Atlantic History, Cinema and Media Studies, Criminology, Islamic Studies, Sociology, and Victorian Literature.

Developed cooperatively with scholars and librarians, each bibliography provides authoritative research guidance with a large collection of articles addressing major themes and topics within a discipline, with commentary and selective, annotated bibliography. The articles cite resources in many formats: books, along with more recent online sources, such as digital archives, datasets, electronic encyclopedias, and more. Output options for saving, annotating and sharing citations and searches are available with each article.

The Oxford Bibliographies provide access to important themes and topics in a field of study or discipline for scholars, researchers, and students. Have a look and see how they might help you in your research!

 

Posted in: African-American Studies, Cinema Studies, Criminal Justice, English and American Literature, History, Library News and Events, Sociology

12
Mar12

Not Sure Where to Start? New in Arts & Humanities Reference Overviews from SAGE

Posted by: Amanda Rust

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Encyclopedias and handbooks provide excellent ways to get an overview and start your research project. (Think of how you use this encyclopedia, probably every day.) To help give context to large research questions, the Library has just purchased a collection of encyclopedias and handbooks from SAGE Reference. You’ll find answers to questions like:

You can search or browse the SAGE Reference collection, and find more resources through our Arts and Humanities subject guides. If you have any comments, let us know here or via email.

Posted in: Anthropology, Art, Business, Cinema Studies, Communication Studies, Criminal Justice, Education, English and American Literature, Foreign Languages and Literatures, History, Music, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Read, Listen, Watch, Religion, Research Online, Serendipity, Sociology, Sports and Recreation, Theater, Women's Studies

26
Sep11

Extended back files of Web of Science now available

Posted by: Jamie Dendy

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An article on a revision of the US Government’s socio-economic index, published in 1982 in the journal, Social Science Research, has been cited by other articles in a broad array of academic journals over 300 times, with the most recent citation being from an article published in June 2011. By extending our offering of Web of Science back files from 1975 through 1992, we are able to provide Northeastern researchers with these historical statistics, allowing them to identify the most important articles, journals, institutions, and authors in their field or subject area of study.

When viewing any article in the Web of Science database, a list of citations from that article are provided as well as a list of other subsequent articles and conference proceedings that cite the original article. Links connect to the full text of the cited articles when the full text is available. And don’t be fooled by the title of this database.  As the above example illustrates, Web of Science covers scholarly articles in all types of sciences that include journals in the humanities and social sciences.

Visit our News & Events page to read more about this collection or visit our full listing of online databases and trials.

Posted in: African-American Studies, American Sign Language, Anthropology, Architecture, Art, Biology, Business, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Cinema Studies, Communication Studies, Computer and Information Science, Criminal Justice, Earth Sciences, Economics, Education, Engineering, English and American Literature, English as a Second Language, Environmental Studies, Foreign Languages and Literatures, Health Sciences, History, Journalism and International Affairs, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Library News and Events, Marine Science, Mathematics, Music, Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Toxicology, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Religion, Research Guides by Subject, Research Online, Scholarly Communications, Serendipity, Sociology, Sports and Recreation, Theater, Women's Studies

6
Apr11

Sad Follow-Up to a Prior Snell Author Talk

Posted by: Rebecca Bailey

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Those who follow Snell Library’s Meet the Author Series may remember author John Hollway’s discussion of his book, Killing Time, the story of an innocent man’s 14 years on death row and how he came to be found innocent and released. At the time of the talk, the Supreme Court was due to hear a civil case brought by the innocent man, John Thompson, and his attorneys against the New Orleans prosecutor’s office that was found to have withheld evidence in the original case, evidence that would have led to his acquittal but whose suppression meant he lost all those years of his life to unjust prison time. A local jury awarded him $14 million to compensate for the time he spent on death row, and appeals courts upheld the award, all the way to the Supreme Court.

A sad update this week, however, as the Supreme Court handed down its 5-4 decision overturning the monetary award, stating the prosecutor’s office could not be held responsible for the “bad actions” of a single person, even though it has been shown that the office had a clear pattern of violations of the rules for handling evidence and was obviously not training its prosecutors in correct procedures — and even though all the lower appeals courts had upheld the local decision that the prosecutor’s office was responsible.

Commentators around the news media are outraged by the decision; for examples, see this New York Times op-ed or this piece in Slate.com.

According to the Facebook page for the book (which by the way offers more links to additional media coverage of the decision, as well as to the text of the decision itself), “Now the only remedy that any of us has for prosecutorial misconduct is a complaint to the State Bar Association — which, in most states, you can only make if you are admitted to the Bar yourself.” This is a grim outcome for all of us, not just John Thompson.

Posted in: Criminal Justice, Information and Society, Read, Listen, Watch

16
Feb11

“Profiling” a Popular Honors Project in IRis

Posted by: Hillary Corbett

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From time to time, I like to feature an object in IRis, our digital archive of research and scholarship at Northeastern, that’s been getting a lot of hits. I get a weekly report e-mailed to me of the most frequently accessed content in IRis, and there’s one honors project that’s been appearing near the top of that weekly list for quite a while now. “Profiling Pros and Cons: An Evaluation of Contemporary Criminal Profiling Methods” was submitted by Theresa M. Young in fulfillment of the Honors Program’s Junior/Senior Project requirement in 2006. In the past year, it’s been accessed 546 times, making it the second most-accessed document in IRis!

We use Google Analytics to track usage of both the library website and IRis, and there’s a lot of fascinating information to be found in those metrics. For example, almost 81% of visitors found Theresa’s project through Google searches; the most commonly searched phrase that brought them to her project was “criminal profiling pros and cons,” where it’s the top result. Although the majority of visitors came from the United States, people in a total of 18 countries accessed Theresa’s project. I found it particularly noteworthy that of the 5 visits from Iraq, 3 of them came via the Department of Defense. Is Theresa’s research having an impact on criminal justice in Iraq? Regardless of how it’s being used, the popularity and relevance of her work, both in the US and around the world, is undeniable.

(After graduating from Northeastern in 2006, Theresa Young went on to law school at the University of Richmond. While there, she served as Executive Editor of the Richmond Journal of Law and the Public Interest.)

Posted in: Criminal Justice, Scholarly Communications