Economics

21
Nov12

Onward and upward with SpringerLink

Posted by: G. Karen Merguerian

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It’s 6am on a cold November morning, and I know I’m not the only one awake.  As I am writing this, a few Northeastern researchers are online with me, and are currently reading:

*A book chapter about the semantic web
*An article about arterial fibrillation
*An article about human trafficking

How do I know this?  Because Springer, the venerable German publisher of chiefly scientific research, has recently updated its SpringerLink web site.

The content on the new site is the same solid high-quality research they’ve always had, searchable and easily linkable, with full text PDFs available DRM-free, even for ebook chapters, to NU affiliates.

But the new site has this “Recent Activity” feature.  It’s anonymous, but anyone, including you, can see a little window into what’s being read on SpringerLink at Northeastern right now.  More importantly, the new SpringerLink site has a cleaned-up layout and style that displays better in a variety of browsers.  The search results page now shows results at the individual book chapter level, with a “look inside” feature for content not licensed by our library that you may want to purchase.  The “advanced search” has been revamped and is easier to use.

We do have a warning about the new site: If you’ve been a “power user” of Springer Link in the past, you may have set up a “My Account” feature to save your searches, tag your results, and keep a history of any personal orders. Please be aware that your “My Account” on the old SpringerLink will NOT be migrated to the new site. (Unfortunately Springer claims that privacy rules prohibit them from notifying account-holders individually.) You’ll have to set up a new account on the new site and start all over.  The new “My Account” also allows you to log in from anywhere, not just through the NU Libraries.

Currently both the old and the new Springer Link sites are available, so “My Account” users should log in over the Thanksgiving break and save what’s in your old account. Beginning sometime Monday morning, 11/26, you’ll be redirected to the new site and the old site and old account information will no longer be available.

So give the new Springer Link a test drive. Have fun seeing the “Recent Activity” of researchers at NU. I just checked, and it’s now a book about genetically modified plants and an article about Harry Potter from an education journal. I’m sure when you log in it will be something completely different!

Posted in: Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Computer and Information Science, Earth Sciences, Economics, Engineering, Environmental Studies, Health Sciences, Marine Science, Mathematics, Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Toxicology, Physics, Research Online

15
May12

Sports Is Big Business; SBRnet Tells You How Big

Posted by: Rebecca Bailey

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Here we are, a month into baseball season, and my beloved Red Sox are showing few signs of emerging from their prolonged slump. Yet they still (so far, anyway!) are maintaining the longest sold-out-games streak in history. Want to check their attendance numbers versus those of other MLB teams? SBRnet can do that.

Brave enough to bike around Boston? (Not me, thanks.) That has the potential to be an expensive hobby. How much do US consumers spend annually on their bicycling habits? SBRnet’s got that information as well.

Maybe you want to advertise a product to female TV viewers of sporting events. But which sports do women watch on television the most? SBRnet can link you to TV Viewing Profiles for all televised sports.

SBRnet is a great tool for sport marketing and business information. It includes statistical data, news, research, and reports on topics such as sport participation, fan profiles, sports facilities, sport finance, sporting goods, sponsorship, marketing, and media.

If you are interested in the business of sports, take a moment to poke around in SBRnet. And as always, let us know what you think, either in the comments below or by contacting us here.

Posted in: Business, Economics, Research Online, Sports and Recreation

26
Sep11

Extended back files of Web of Science now available

Posted by: Jamie Dendy

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An article on a revision of the US Government’s socio-economic index, published in 1982 in the journal, Social Science Research, has been cited by other articles in a broad array of academic journals over 300 times, with the most recent citation being from an article published in June 2011. By extending our offering of Web of Science back files from 1975 through 1992, we are able to provide Northeastern researchers with these historical statistics, allowing them to identify the most important articles, journals, institutions, and authors in their field or subject area of study.

When viewing any article in the Web of Science database, a list of citations from that article are provided as well as a list of other subsequent articles and conference proceedings that cite the original article. Links connect to the full text of the cited articles when the full text is available. And don’t be fooled by the title of this database.  As the above example illustrates, Web of Science covers scholarly articles in all types of sciences that include journals in the humanities and social sciences.

Visit our News & Events page to read more about this collection or visit our full listing of online databases and trials.

Posted in: African-American Studies, American Sign Language, Anthropology, Architecture, Art, Biology, Business, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Cinema Studies, Communication Studies, Computer and Information Science, Criminal Justice, Earth Sciences, Economics, Education, Engineering, English and American Literature, English as a Second Language, Environmental Studies, Foreign Languages and Literatures, Health Sciences, History, Journalism and International Affairs, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Library News and Events, Marine Science, Mathematics, Music, Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Toxicology, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Religion, Research Guides by Subject, Research Online, Scholarly Communications, Serendipity, Sociology, Sports and Recreation, Theater, Women's Studies

18
May11

New Resource: Annual Reviews Online Back Volume Collection (1932-2006)

Posted by: Rebecca Bailey

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Need a summary of research in Biomedical, Life, Physical, or Social Sciences?

To supplement our ongoing access to the Annual Reviews, Snell Library is pleased to offer the Electronic Back Volume Collection, which has over 70 years of research online — timely collections of critical reviews written by leading scientists and social scientists from 1932-2006. It offers seamless access to a comprehensive collection of all available Annual Reviews Sciences Collection back volumes, with content dating back to the very first volume of the Annual Review of Biochemistry in 1932.

Features and Benefits

  • A comprehensive online collection of available Annual Reviews Sciences Collection with content spanning Biomedical, Life, Physical, and Social Sciences, including Economics
  • Immediate access to 1,100+ volumes, comprising over 25,000 critical and authoritative review articles from 1932-2006
  • Color and grayscale figures, charts, tables, and cited literature available via full-text searchable PDFs

You may also wish to look at Annual Reviews‘ audio and video series featuring interviews with foremost scientific scholars.

To find Annual Reviews, click here to link directly, or go to the Library home page and click on All Databases and Trials for an A-Z list.

Posted in: Anthropology, Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Computer and Information Science, Earth Sciences, Economics, Engineering, Environmental Studies, Health Sciences, Library News and Events, Marine Science, Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Toxicology, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Research Online, Serendipity, Sociology

16
Nov10

Rolling Stone Columnist: Matt Taibbi at Snell Library

Posted by: Josef Bober

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Tomorrow, Wednesday, November 17th, Rolling Stone columnist Matt Taibbi will be featured in Snell Library’s Meet the Author series with his new book Griftopia. Come for refreshments and a lot of laughs. Matt Taibbi takes a humorous and at times very serious stance on just about all of the big headlines of the news. Notorious for his political comments, Matt wrote Griftopia to report the inside scoop on America’s failing economy and who’s to blame. Come to learn about all of the latest struggles America is facing and some that undoubtedly will be challenges for the future. Want a taste? Check out his blog on True/Slant for a small dose of the excitement about to come. You can purchase a book at the event and even get it signed. Don’t forget to bring your questions and/or rants!

This event is sponsored by NU Libraries and the NU Bookstore.

Posted in: Economics, Library News and Events