Health Sciences

26
Aug14

Bouvé College of Health Sciences Celebrates 100th Anniversary with Archival Photographs

Posted by: Claudia Willett

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In 1913, Marjorie Bouvé, Bessie Barnes, Caroline Baxter, Marguerite Sanderson, Grace Shepardson, Mary Florence Stratton, and Miriam Tobey established The Boston School of Physical Education.

The School was established to provide for women a thorough training in physical education which would fit them to meet as teachers the increasing need for instruction in the proper use of the body and its functions in relation to human efficiency … the school proposes to graduate only such students as will make good teachers and who are qualified to carry forward and maintain the highest ideals of p.e. in their professional work.” (First Annual Catalog, page 3, BBC, Box 48, Folder 4)

[Bouvé students learn physical therapy techniques at summer camp, ca. 1960]

These seven women recognized an important education gap in the Greater Boston Area and set out to fill it. Success was immediate. In its inaugural year, the Class of 1915 entered the school with 11 members.  Since its founding, the school has been affiliated with three Boston-area universities, survived splits and mergers, and graduated countless health sciences professionals.  This complex, detailed history of the school’s move from independent school to The Bouvé College of Health Sciences at Northeastern University are stored in the Archives and Special Collections Department of Snell Library. We are pleased to preserve and carefully curate the historical Bouvé College of Health Sciences records as well as Marjorie Bouvé’s personal papers.

When the The Bouvé College of Health Sciences started working to establish a commemorative timeline in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the first graduating class, they immediately looked to the Archives and Special Collections department. With help from archives staff, Bouvé representatives spent gainful hours looking through the collection to identify original, interesting photographs to illuminate the history of the college. Archives staff then digitized the requested images and provided the college with a disc of high quality, scanned images for continued use. We look forward to the publication of the timeline and future research in Northeastern University’s historical collections.

For more on the history of the Bouvé College of Health Sciences and its founders check out the archives’ online exhibit.

Posted in: Archives and Special Collections, Health Sciences, History, Sports and Recreation

19
Dec13

ClinicalKey with Expanded Content Replaces MD Consult Effective January 1, 2014

Posted by: Sandy Dunphy

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Elsevier’s ClinicalKey will replace its older MD Consult resource beginning January 1, 2014. You will be able to find links to ClinicalKey from all of the same places you now can find MD Consult (the library’s A to Z index, Books & E-Books, and the Biomedical and Health subject guides).

ClinicalKey brings together greatly expanded content, including hundreds of additional e-books, e-journals, practice guidelines, videos, and images.

ClinicalKey includes the following expanded features:

  • single search interface across resources
  • 900+ top medical books in medicine and surgery
  • 500+ medical journals
  • 15,000 medical & surgical videos
  • 15,000 patient education handouts
  • 2,800 drug monographs from Gold Standard
  • 800+ First Consult point-of-care clinical monographs that assist with complex cases
  • more than 5 million images
  • 4,000 practice guidelines


Take a video guided tour of ClinicalKey now!

Posted in: Health Sciences, Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Toxicology, Research Online

17
Jul13

Spread the word: New full-text e-resources in medicine, pharmacy, and physical therapy are now available

Posted by: Katherine Herrlich

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AccessPhysiotherapy covers physical therapy, AccessMedicine covers medical/health sciences, and AccessPharmacy is the tool of choice for pharmacy.

These resources from McGraw-Hill were designed especially for instructors and students, with a focus on curricular topics, Q & A, self-assessment, core titles for assigned reading, high quality images, animation tools to convey concepts, and videos that demonstrate clinical practices.  Content can be embedded in Blackboard.

Mobile access: These resources are optimized for the iPhone, Google Android devices and the Blackberry Bold.

Highlights:

AccessPhysiotherapy

  • 500+ videos and narrated lectures in key topics in orthopedics, neurology and sports medicine; demonstrations of various examination and treatment techniques
  • Anatomy and Physiology Revealed”, a powerful cadaver dissection tool with imaging slides and animations
  • Essentials of Neuroscience in Physical Therapy”, an ongoing lecture series, which combines graphics, case studies, and narration to teach key neuroscience and neuroanatomy concepts relating to physical therapy
  • “Custom Curriculum”, a cutting edge tool to assign, manage, and track the progress of student assignments

AccessMedicine

  • 77 essential medical texts, including “Harrison’s Online”, “Hurst’s The Heart”, “Current Medical Diagnosis & Treatment”, and “DeGowin’s Diagnostic Examination”
  • Thousands of photos and illustrations
  • Diagnosaurus, the differential diagnosis tool
  • Interactive patient safety modules, musculoskeletal exams, case files, and Q & A
  • 200+ procedural videos and Grand Rounds lectures

AccessPharmacy

  •  Drug databases, cases, self-assessment tools, animations, and full text of these core titles:
    • DiPiro’s Pharmacotherapy: A Pathophysiologic Approach, 8e
    • Pharmacotherapy Casebook: A Patient-Focused Approach, 8e
    • Goodman & Gilman’s The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 12e
    • Applied Biopharmaceutics & Pharmacokinetics, 6e
    • Basic & Clinical Pharmacology, 12e
    • Casarett & Doulls Essentials of Toxicology, 2e
    • Drug Information: A Guide for Pharmacists, 4e
    • Ganong’s Review of Medical Physiology, 24e
    • Pharmacy and Federal Drug Law Review
    • Pharmacy Student Survival Guide, 2e
    • Understanding Health Policy: A Clinical Approach, 6e

Register for a My AccessMedicine, My AccessPharmacy or My AccessPhysiotherapy account to enter the mobile sites, save and download images, bookmark content pages, view and print CE certificates, customize patient education handouts, re-run recent searches, and use the Custom Curriculum.

For more information on health sciences resources, please see the biomedical and health subject guides.

 

Posted in: Health Sciences, Library News and Events, Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Toxicology, Research Online

6
Mar13

Codebreakers: Makers of Modern Genetics

Posted by: Jen Ferguson

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Heredity charts I-VI: published for the Eugenics Society by George Philip & Son Ltd.

Image courtesy the Wellcome Library

Codebreakers:  Makers of Modern Genetics is a newly-launched treasure trove for fans of science, history, and of course, the history of science!

The Wellcome Library has digitized the papers of key players in genetics from the last century and made them freely available online. Works of CrickWatsonFranklinWilkins, and Haldane are all represented, to name a few. The papers include lab notebooks, sketches, articles, drafts and general correspondence. The site also contains items from the archive of the Eugenics Society, including the heredity chart shown above. In addition to these digitized artifacts, the site features digitized books and a great interactive timeline on the history of genetics.

Posted in: Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Health Sciences, Read, Listen, Watch, Research Online

21
Nov12

Onward and upward with SpringerLink

Posted by: G. Karen Merguerian

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It’s 6am on a cold November morning, and I know I’m not the only one awake.  As I am writing this, a few Northeastern researchers are online with me, and are currently reading:

*A book chapter about the semantic web
*An article about arterial fibrillation
*An article about human trafficking

How do I know this?  Because Springer, the venerable German publisher of chiefly scientific research, has recently updated its SpringerLink web site.

The content on the new site is the same solid high-quality research they’ve always had, searchable and easily linkable, with full text PDFs available DRM-free, even for ebook chapters, to NU affiliates.

But the new site has this “Recent Activity” feature.  It’s anonymous, but anyone, including you, can see a little window into what’s being read on SpringerLink at Northeastern right now.  More importantly, the new SpringerLink site has a cleaned-up layout and style that displays better in a variety of browsers.  The search results page now shows results at the individual book chapter level, with a “look inside” feature for content not licensed by our library that you may want to purchase.  The “advanced search” has been revamped and is easier to use.

We do have a warning about the new site: If you’ve been a “power user” of Springer Link in the past, you may have set up a “My Account” feature to save your searches, tag your results, and keep a history of any personal orders. Please be aware that your “My Account” on the old SpringerLink will NOT be migrated to the new site. (Unfortunately Springer claims that privacy rules prohibit them from notifying account-holders individually.) You’ll have to set up a new account on the new site and start all over.  The new “My Account” also allows you to log in from anywhere, not just through the NU Libraries.

Currently both the old and the new Springer Link sites are available, so “My Account” users should log in over the Thanksgiving break and save what’s in your old account. Beginning sometime Monday morning, 11/26, you’ll be redirected to the new site and the old site and old account information will no longer be available.

So give the new Springer Link a test drive. Have fun seeing the “Recent Activity” of researchers at NU. I just checked, and it’s now a book about genetically modified plants and an article about Harry Potter from an education journal. I’m sure when you log in it will be something completely different!

Posted in: Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Computer and Information Science, Earth Sciences, Economics, Engineering, Environmental Studies, Health Sciences, Marine Science, Mathematics, Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Toxicology, Physics, Research Online