Political Science

30
Oct12

Feed your Inner Policy Wonk

Posted by: Roxanne Palmatier

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Just can’t get enough politics? The Library can help!  Sample our polling resources and online political encyclopedias or ask about other options at the Research Assistance Desk in the new Digital Media Commons.

Visit the Roper Center Public Opinion Archives to immerse yourself in Presidential approval ratings, state and national exit polls, or facts and figures on Presidential elections from 1976 through 2008. For the more adventurous researcher, Roper’s iPoll database provides access to poll questions and survey data collected from the 1930’s to present.  Track public opinion on the trustworthiness of the President, Congress, and individual candidates from the late 1980’s onward.  Check a recent Bloomberg poll to learn which Presidential candidate is considered best qualified to handle relations with Middle Eastern countries in the aftermath of the Benghazi consulate incident.

Polling the Nations includes polls conducted abroad and in the U.S.  You’ll learn how respondents in selected countries feel about President Obama’s foreign policy decisions.  Check a Pew Research Center poll to see how world leaders, including President Obama, are rated by citizens from a variety of nations.

For background information on the office of President, try CQ’s Guide to the Presidency and the Executive Branch. This resource provides an excellent overview of all aspects of the presidency from executive powers through the perks available on Air Force One (personalized boxes of M&M’s!).  A companion publication, CQ’s Guide to Congress is also available. Learn about the powers reserved to the Congress or check on the perks available to your Representatives and Senators.

Vital Statistics on American Politics offers statistics on campaign finance, media outlets and politics, voter turnout, and mid-term elections among other topics. Online editions are available from 2005 to present and offer several options for downloading data. Print volumes for the years 1990 through 2008 are available in the Snell Stacks JK274 S74.

For background on elections and political parties worldwide, check the newly acquired International Encyclopedia of Political Science.  Articles on political parties, electoral geography, and electoral campaigns provide background on these topics in both the U.S. and other countries.

To see photos from Presidential debates, past and present, visit our AP Images database. Classic photos from the 1960 Nixon/Kennedy debates make an interesting contrast with the current Obama/Romney debate images.  For starters, only one of the Nixon/Kennedy images is in color!   Debate moderators from the sixties are identified in photo captions only; today, they’re celebrities in their own rights with photos included with those of the candidates.

Please visit our Political Science Subject Guide to learn about other political/policy research tools provided by the University Libraries.

Posted in: Political Science, Research Online

25
Apr12

Policy Making Begins at Home

Posted by: Roxanne Palmatier

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Update: Stephen Flynn, founding co-director of Northeastern’s George J. Costas Research Institute for Homeland Security, testified before Congress on Tuesday this week about cyber security concerns.

Policy making isn’t always an “inside the beltway phenomenon” or the exclusive preserve of Washington insiders. Northeastern faculty and staff are frequent visitors to Congressional hearing rooms, providing expert testimony on topics as diverse as hate crimes, tobacco regulation, airline mergers, autism, the economic downturn, and human trafficking.

In 2008, President Joseph Aoun welcomed Senator Ted Kennedy, invited witnesses, and members of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions to NU for a hearing on access to higher education. Ensuring Access to College in a Turbulent Economy provides a verbatim record of these proceedings.

Other recent hearings with a local connection include:

Mitchell Report: Illegal Use of Steroids in Major League Baseball – Includes testimony of former Red Sox pitcher Roger Clemens and his colleague, New York Yankees player Andy Pettitte.

Digging Up the Facts: Inspecting the Big Dig – More on the project Bostonians love to hate: water leaks, shoddy building materials, and cost overruns.

Learning from the States: Individual State Experiences with Healthcare Reform Coverage Initiatives – The Commonwealth’s flagship program for universal healthcare coverage, now much in the spotlight in the 2012 Presidential election.

Ten Years after 9/11: Assessing Airport Security and Preventing a Future Terrorist Attack – This hearing was held in Boston since two of the affected flights originated at Logan International Airport.

The NU Library provides access to historic and contemporary U.S. Government documents in online and print formats. Key collections include:

  • Proquest Digital Hearings: Congressional hearings from 1824 to present
  • FDsys: The government site for authenticated, permanent access to important document series, including the Congressional Record (1994 to present), Code of Federal Regulations, Federal Register, Compilation of Presidential Documents, federal budget, Statutes at Large, United States Code, etc.
  • HeinOnline: Historical and contemporary government documents, including Foreign Relations of the United States, treaties, Presidential Papers, and the Congressional Record and its predecessors.
  • U.S. Congressional Serial Set and American State Papers: Rich collection of primary source materials from Congress and other government agencies.  The set includes an historical map collection.

Consult the Federal Government Subject Guide for information about additional government publications.

Posted in: History, Political Science, Research Online

12
Mar12

Not Sure Where to Start? New in Arts & Humanities Reference Overviews from SAGE

Posted by: Amanda Rust

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Encyclopedias and handbooks provide excellent ways to get an overview and start your research project. (Think of how you use this encyclopedia, probably every day.) To help give context to large research questions, the Library has just purchased a collection of encyclopedias and handbooks from SAGE Reference. You’ll find answers to questions like:

You can search or browse the SAGE Reference collection, and find more resources through our Arts and Humanities subject guides. If you have any comments, let us know here or via email.

Posted in: Anthropology, Art, Business, Cinema Studies, Communication Studies, Criminal Justice, Education, English and American Literature, Foreign Languages and Literatures, History, Music, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Read, Listen, Watch, Religion, Research Online, Serendipity, Sociology, Sports and Recreation, Theater, Women's Studies

26
Sep11

Extended back files of Web of Science now available

Posted by: Jamie Dendy

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An article on a revision of the US Government’s socio-economic index, published in 1982 in the journal, Social Science Research, has been cited by other articles in a broad array of academic journals over 300 times, with the most recent citation being from an article published in June 2011. By extending our offering of Web of Science back files from 1975 through 1992, we are able to provide Northeastern researchers with these historical statistics, allowing them to identify the most important articles, journals, institutions, and authors in their field or subject area of study.

When viewing any article in the Web of Science database, a list of citations from that article are provided as well as a list of other subsequent articles and conference proceedings that cite the original article. Links connect to the full text of the cited articles when the full text is available. And don’t be fooled by the title of this database.  As the above example illustrates, Web of Science covers scholarly articles in all types of sciences that include journals in the humanities and social sciences.

Visit our News & Events page to read more about this collection or visit our full listing of online databases and trials.

Posted in: African-American Studies, American Sign Language, Anthropology, Architecture, Art, Biology, Business, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Cinema Studies, Communication Studies, Computer and Information Science, Criminal Justice, Earth Sciences, Economics, Education, Engineering, English and American Literature, English as a Second Language, Environmental Studies, Foreign Languages and Literatures, Health Sciences, History, Journalism and International Affairs, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Library News and Events, Marine Science, Mathematics, Music, Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Toxicology, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Religion, Research Guides by Subject, Research Online, Scholarly Communications, Serendipity, Sociology, Sports and Recreation, Theater, Women's Studies

21
Jun11

Introducing Mideastwire

Posted by: Roxanne Palmatier

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Mideastwire provides daily English-language summaries of key political, cultural, economic, and opinion pieces produced by the media in 22 Arab countries, Iran, and the Arab Diaspora. Although this resource is particularly relevant for faculty and students in Political Science, International Affairs, Journalism, and International Business, it will be of interest to anyone following current developments in the Middle East and Arab world.

Automatic delivery of a daily briefing is available through RSS feed or e-mail. To enable e-mail delivery of the daily briefing, send a blank e-mail message to info@mideastwire.com. Please note that there are currently some difficulties with delivery to Gmail accounts; Gmail users, please see the following FAQ: http://0-www.mideastwire.com.ilsprod.lib.neu.edu/faq.php. A link to RSS feeds is available on the home page of Mideastwire.

Additional features include:

  • Links from each translated article to the original news piece which offers users the look and feel of the original news source. Additionally, readers fluent in the language of publication may view the original.
  • Five year archive for issue tracking.
  • Basic and advanced searching of the article archive.
  • Access to the Mideastwire blog.
  • Links to related websites.
  • Alumni access.

Mideastwire enhances international news coverage already provided through other library resources, including EIU.com, Press Display, Access World News, and Lexis/Nexis Academic.

Posted in: Foreign Languages and Literatures, Information and Society, Journalism and International Affairs, Library News and Events, Political Science, Research Online, Serendipity