Foreign Languages and Literatures

12
Mar12

Not Sure Where to Start? New in Arts & Humanities Reference Overviews from SAGE

Posted by: Amanda Rust

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Encyclopedias and handbooks provide excellent ways to get an overview and start your research project. (Think of how you use this encyclopedia, probably every day.) To help give context to large research questions, the Library has just purchased a collection of encyclopedias and handbooks from SAGE Reference. You’ll find answers to questions like:

You can search or browse the SAGE Reference collection, and find more resources through our Arts and Humanities subject guides. If you have any comments, let us know here or via email.

Posted in: Anthropology, Art, Business, Cinema Studies, Communication Studies, Criminal Justice, Education, English and American Literature, Foreign Languages and Literatures, History, Music, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Read, Listen, Watch, Religion, Research Online, Serendipity, Sociology, Sports and Recreation, Theater, Women's Studies

6
Mar12

Learn a Language with the BBC

Posted by: Rebecca Bailey

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In my role as the librarian for Foreign Languages and Literatures, I get questions all the time from people who are looking for materials to help them learn a foreign language. So I’m always on the lookout for free online resources to which I can direct people.

One that has just come to my attention is the BBC’s Languages site. This site offers a wealth of free language lessons and tools, for a variety of languages. You can watch videos, see vocabulary lists, subscribe to phrase-a-day RSS feeds, sign up for email tips, and more. It seems to have the most content for French, German, Italian, and Spanish, but there are 40 languages for which they at least offer lists of useful phrases.

So, if you want to do some language prep for your study abroad trip or your international co-op (or spring break!), you may want to see what the BBC has to offer you. You can also check out my subject guide for Foreign Languages & Literatures for other helpful language links. And buena suerte / bonne chance / viel Glück / good luck with your language study!

Posted in: Foreign Languages and Literatures, Read, Listen, Watch, Staff Interests

16
Nov11

Linguistics Film Screening at MIT, 11/17/11

Posted by: Rebecca Bailey

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I just found out about a very cool event: this Thursday, 11/17/11, at MIT at 7pm, there will be a screening of the documentary film We Still Live Here – As Nutayunean. This film is about the efforts of the Wampanoag Indian Tribe of Massachusetts to revive their language after the death of the last native speaker. A copy has been purchased for Snell Library and is on reserve, so you can view it on your own at any time, but the screening at MIT will also feature a question-and-answer session afterward with the filmmaker and several linguists who have worked with the tribe on the language reclamation project. See this MIT calendar listing for more information.

The film will also air on the PBS program Independent Lens in the near future. Check your local listings for airtimes.

Posted in: Foreign Languages and Literatures, Read, Listen, Watch, Staff Interests

26
Sep11

Extended back files of Web of Science now available

Posted by: Jamie Dendy

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An article on a revision of the US Government’s socio-economic index, published in 1982 in the journal, Social Science Research, has been cited by other articles in a broad array of academic journals over 300 times, with the most recent citation being from an article published in June 2011. By extending our offering of Web of Science back files from 1975 through 1992, we are able to provide Northeastern researchers with these historical statistics, allowing them to identify the most important articles, journals, institutions, and authors in their field or subject area of study.

When viewing any article in the Web of Science database, a list of citations from that article are provided as well as a list of other subsequent articles and conference proceedings that cite the original article. Links connect to the full text of the cited articles when the full text is available. And don’t be fooled by the title of this database.  As the above example illustrates, Web of Science covers scholarly articles in all types of sciences that include journals in the humanities and social sciences.

Visit our News & Events page to read more about this collection or visit our full listing of online databases and trials.

Posted in: African-American Studies, American Sign Language, Anthropology, Architecture, Art, Biology, Business, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Cinema Studies, Communication Studies, Computer and Information Science, Criminal Justice, Earth Sciences, Economics, Education, Engineering, English and American Literature, English as a Second Language, Environmental Studies, Foreign Languages and Literatures, Health Sciences, History, Journalism and International Affairs, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Library News and Events, Marine Science, Mathematics, Music, Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Toxicology, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Religion, Research Guides by Subject, Research Online, Scholarly Communications, Serendipity, Sociology, Sports and Recreation, Theater, Women's Studies

29
Jun11

NU Professor Highlights Latin American Jewish Art and Poetry

Posted by: Kirsten Forsberg

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Northeastern Spanish and Latin American literature professor Stephen Sadow worked with his Argentinian colleagues to create a collection of fourteen “artist’s books” that feature poems and artwork of the Jewish communities in Latin America.

Sadow selected 14 poems, and then assigned each one to a Jewish artist from Latin America. The artists were asked to create a unique piece of artwork to match their interpretation of the poem they were assigned. The poems focus on a range of themes: Jewish identity, mysticism, Old Testament themes, the Holocaust, and the 1994 bombing of a Jewish community in Argentina, among others.

In addition to this poetry compilation, Sadow also recently completed an “open source” anthology that features the work of 13 Latin American Jewish poets from the 1960s to the present. This anthology, and many of his other works, can be found in IRis, Northeastern University Libraries’ digital archive!

For more information read the recent NU News article on Professor Sadow’s work.

Posted in: Foreign Languages and Literatures, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Library News and Events, Serendipity