Foreign Languages and Literatures

21
Jun11

Introducing Mideastwire

Posted by: Roxanne Palmatier

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Mideastwire provides daily English-language summaries of key political, cultural, economic, and opinion pieces produced by the media in 22 Arab countries, Iran, and the Arab Diaspora. Although this resource is particularly relevant for faculty and students in Political Science, International Affairs, Journalism, and International Business, it will be of interest to anyone following current developments in the Middle East and Arab world.

Automatic delivery of a daily briefing is available through RSS feed or e-mail. To enable e-mail delivery of the daily briefing, send a blank e-mail message to info@mideastwire.com. Please note that there are currently some difficulties with delivery to Gmail accounts; Gmail users, please see the following FAQ: http://0-www.mideastwire.com.ilsprod.lib.neu.edu/faq.php. A link to RSS feeds is available on the home page of Mideastwire.

Additional features include:

  • Links from each translated article to the original news piece which offers users the look and feel of the original news source. Additionally, readers fluent in the language of publication may view the original.
  • Five year archive for issue tracking.
  • Basic and advanced searching of the article archive.
  • Access to the Mideastwire blog.
  • Links to related websites.
  • Alumni access.

Mideastwire enhances international news coverage already provided through other library resources, including EIU.com, Press Display, Access World News, and Lexis/Nexis Academic.

Posted in: Foreign Languages and Literatures, Information and Society, Journalism and International Affairs, Library News and Events, Political Science, Research Online, Serendipity

18
May11

Full-Color Nostradamus, Galileo, Kepler, and More

Posted by: Amanda Rust

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Google Books, in partnership with many of the great libraries in Europe, has just released full-color scans of important texts from the 16th and 17th centuries. They include Nostradamus’ prophecies, Kepler’s textbook on astronomy, and several works by Galileo including his Systema cosmicum, arguing that the Earth revolves around the Sun.

The full-color scans are particularly important for illustrations, diagrams, maps, and distinguishing handwriting. Some of the books ages’ lead to bleedthrough (where the type on the other side of the page is visible), but even in those cases the full-color images give a sense of how the physical material has changed over time.

There is not a separate interface through which you can access these books, but using the date limiters in the Google Books Advanced Search will help you find them. More detail is available at the Inside Google Books blog post.

Posted in: English and American Literature, Foreign Languages and Literatures, History, Research Online

15
Dec10

Oxford English Dictionary Is a Polished-Up Jewel

Posted by: G. Karen Merguerian

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The new Oxford English Dictionary Online is now available through the NU Libraries.

If you love the OED, don’t be alarmed by the word “new”! All the content, the words, pronunciations, etymologies, definitions, and everything else you love and trust is still there, unchanged.

But for this new edition, Oxford has added new content, new ways of appreciating the English language, and new technical features.

New content

From a productivity standpoint, for my money the most important content addition is the integration of a thesaurus. Each definition of the word has a prominent “Thesaurus” link that allows you to see a few alternatives. The dictionary is also integrated with the Historical Thesaurus to the OED, which places your word in an outline form with related words.

In fact, overall, Oxford has placed a high value on historical content and there’s a lot more word history to explore. For example:

*Links to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography give you more information about the authors of the example quotations. (For full biographies from this resource, see Snell Library’s print edition.)

*A list of most-cited authors and texts, updated each quarter, shows you what the OED uses for sources.

*Essays by OED staff historians have also been added on the history of the English language.

*A fun time-killing feature called “Timelines” leverages the incredible amount of information packed into the dictionary by allowing you to analyze it more like a database. Choose a broad topic like “Military” and see when new military words were added to the language. Sort them by region (Ireland, Australia, etc…) to see in what part of the world they originated. Link to lists of those words for browsing.

New functionality

An updated design and some great new technical features allow you to navigate the site more easily and appreciate the incredible richness and history of our language.

*When you do a search with many results, the first screen gives you a peek into each word so you know which one you want.

*Once you select a word, a scroll bar along the definition allows you to navigate more easily.

*A text enlargement feature is built into the definition page.

*The pronunciation symbols are explained in a pop-up box for every word.

*You can save instead of just printing and emailing.

*”About this entry” tells you when the word first entered the dictionary, what other words link to this word, and other facts.

*Each word has a “Cite” button that gives you the correct citation for MLA and Chicago for your bibliography, for download to Endnote, ProCite, RefWorks, and Reference Manager software.

*During your session, the dictionary remembers the words you searched so you can go back to them.

*”My Oxford English Dictionary” is a new feature for saving your searches, creating folders to organize your favorite words, and setting preferences such as how much information you want to display on each page.

How did we even tolerate this dictionary before this update? It’s hard to imagine! Enjoy the beautiful polish and shine on this online dictionary, a true jewel of the English language.

Posted in: English as a Second Language, Foreign Languages and Literatures, Library News and Events, Research Online

2
Aug10

Smithsonian Global Sound’s Mobile App is Here!

Posted by: Debra Mandel

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Smithsonian Global Sound, Alexander Street Press‘s “virtual encyclopedia of the world’s musical and aural traditions,” has three convenient ways to access recordings from your mobile phone. Select a track you wish to listen to, click on the mobile phone icon, and choose one of three methods for accessing the track (and entire album!) from your mobile device.

Click on the screen shot below of the Cajun Home Music Album to see the pop-up help menu you will receive.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact me at d.mandel@neu.edu.

Debra Mandel

Posted in: African-American Studies, Anthropology, English and American Literature, Foreign Languages and Literatures, Information and Society, Journalism and International Affairs, Music, Read, Listen, Watch, Serendipity, Sociology

14
Oct09

Meet Author Dahlma Llanos-Figueroa, Thursday 10/15 at noon

Posted by: Rebecca Bailey

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cover image for Daughters of the Stone

Please join us for the latest in the Library’s Meet The Author series this Thursday, October 15, at noon in room 90, Snell Library. Author Dahlma Llanos-Figueroa will discuss her novel, Daughters of the Stone, which follows five generations of Afro-Puerto Rican women from the mid-1800s to the present. The event is also sponsored by the NU Latino/a Student Cultural Center, the NU Women’s Studies Program, and the NU Bookstore. For more information on this and other programs in the Meet The Author series, see our calendar of events. Hope to see you on Thursday at noon!

Posted in: Foreign Languages and Literatures, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Library News and Events, Read, Listen, Watch