Library News and Events

27
Nov17

Northeastern Archives’ Elma Lewis honored by Celebrity Series of Boston

Posted by: Molly Brown

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Elma Lewis, whose papers reside in the Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections and is the founder of the Elma Lewis School of Fine Arts, the National Center of Afro-American Artists, and the Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists will be celebrated along with choreographer Alvin Ailey by the Celebrity Series of Boston at John Hancock Hall on Wednesday, December 6 at 7:00 PM.

Celebrity Series of Boston’s event is entitled “REVELATIONS: The Legacies of Alvin Ailey and Boston’s Elma Lewis.” The event is free and open to the public.

If you are interested in attending please follow this link to register and find more information: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/revelations-the-legacies-of-alvin-ailey-and-bostons-elma-lewis-tickets-39629597192?aff=cswebsite

If you are interested in finding out more about Elma Lewis and her legacy in the arts and African American communities in Boston visit the Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections finding aid for her papers here: http://www.library.neu.edu/archives/collect/findaids/m38findprint.htm

Posted in: Archives and Special Collections, Library News and Events

30
Aug17

An Update on Our Wikipedia Visiting Scholar

Posted by: Caroline Klibanoff

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In March, we welcomed Rosie Stephenson-Goodknight as our first Wikipedia Visiting Scholar, working to improve the presence of Wikipedia articles on women and writing before 1900. Her work is supported by scholars in the Women Writers Project and Northeastern reference librarians.

Rosie will be with us, working remotely, through December of this year and has already made remarkable progress on bolstering the canon of women writers and their works on Wikipedia. She has created new pages for over 86 women and/or works by women, and has improved many others with additional information, context and citations.

Through Rosie’s work, you can now learn about Birdie Blye, a descendant of John Hancock who was a child prodigy at the piano and gave concert tours in Europe at just 11 years old, before writing articles about her travels and music criticism. You can get to know Lilian Bell, a novelist who made waves with her first fiction book, The Love Affairs of an Old Maid. Bell’s mother was such a careful editor, and tough critic, that Bell found no reason to dread her books being reviewed: “What have I to fear from the public?” she asked. “Mamma has read it.”

 

Birdie Blye

You can also learn about Mittie Frances Clarke Point, a turn-of-the-century novelist who wrote 80 dime store novels under the pseudonym Mrs. Alex McVeigh Miller; Emily Thornton Charles, a journalist who founded the Washington, D.C. newspaper National Veteran; and Mary Catherine Chase, a 19th-century Catholic nun who wrote essays and literature under pen names.

You can keep up with Rosie’s work on her Wikipedia page. We look forward to seeing more of Rosie’s work throughout her time with us this year.

 

Posted in: Information and Society, Library News and Events

22
Aug17

Fall Course Reserves: Submit Now!

Posted by: Erin Beach

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Reserve BooksFaculty and staff, this is the perfect time to submit your course reserve requests for Fall 2017!  Classes will be underway in less than two weeks, and the sooner we receive your materials, the sooner we’ll have them ready for students to borrow. To request library materials for reserve, submit this form (myNEU login required). The library doesn’t purchase textbooks for courses, but we’d be happy to add your personal copies to our catalog; just print out the completed request form and drop it off with your textbooks at the Help and Information Desk on the 1st floor. 

Feel free to get in touch with me directly with any questions or concerns.

Posted in: Library News and Events, Serendipity

21
Feb17

Fair Use and the Arts: Collage-Making at Snell Library

Posted by: Hillary Corbett

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February 20-24 is Fair Use Week, and this year Snell Library is focusing on the arts. Come and make a collage with us…details below!

What is fair use? It’s a right granted to us that allows us to use copyrighted materials without permission from the copyright holder, under certain circumstances. The central purpose of the doctrine of fair use is to encourage creative expression and innovation through the transformative use of intellectual property. It is part of U.S. copyright law.

People often ask, “how much of someone else’s work can I use without asking permission and have it be considered fair use?” The answer is “it depends.” Fairness is something that needs to be assessed for each potential usage, against four factors:

  1. The intended purpose and character of the use, such as whether it’s for commercial or noncommercial, educational use.
  2. The nature of the copyrighted work – is it factual or creative?
  3. The amount of the portion to be used in relation to the entire work.
  4. The effect of the use on the potential market for the original work.

There’s also a concept of “transformativeness,” which, while not specifically codified in copyright law, has been shown to be a favored use. Transformativeness has to do with the creation of a new work through the use of others’ work. Recording artists and visual artists use remixing, mashups, and sampling in this way. Sometimes they need to ask permission, but sometimes appropriation of others’ work is considered fair use, and the courts agree:

Make a Collage and Learn More About Fair Use!

Creativity can be a great way to think about how fair use can apply in your research output and other work. Our Art and Architecture librarian, Regina Pagani, and I will be hosting a collage table in the lobby of Snell Library on Thursday and Friday this week (2/23 and 2/24), from 2:00 to 4:00. Stop by and find out more about fair use, and make your own collage to take with you or contribute to a larger collaborative effort!

Further Reading:

Posted in: Art, Library News and Events, Serendipity

15
Feb17

2017 Call for Proposals: The CERES Exhibit Toolkit

Posted by: Sarah Sweeney

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CERES Exhibit Toolkit Call for Proposals

The Digital Scholarship Group is now accepting proposals for the next round of CERES Exhibit Toolkit development (formerly known as The DRS Project Toolkit). The CERES Exhibit Toolkit is a user-friendly set of tools for building digital projects and publications using digital materials from the Digital Repository Service (DRS) or the Digital Public Library of America. With CERES users can create exhibits, galleries, maps, timelines, and playlists that draw digital materials dynamically from the DRS or the DPLA.

We are also excited to announce a new program of support for classroom use of the CERES Exhibit Toolkit. We invite proposals from faculty for courses to be held in Fall 2017 and Spring 2018.

Feature development CERES will be a collaborative endeavor and a great opportunity to experiment with publishing your project’s materials. If you have a project idea, we’d love to hear from you! Just answer a few questions about your project to apply.

Examples of successful projects from the first two years of the CERES project include:

Accepted projects will partner with the DSG and DRS teams to use CERES to securely store their project materials in the DRS and create a customized WordPress site to publish those materials on the web.

If you have questions, the DSG staff are glad to meet and discuss project proposals before the deadline; please contact us at DSG@northeastern.edu to set up a meeting.

Please visit the DRS Resources page for more information about the DRS. If you don’t think CERES is right for your project, but you are still interested in securely storing project files in the DRS, contact Sarah Sweeney.

Posted in: Library News and Events