Library News and Events

12
Feb18

Neighborhood Matters, Spring 2018

Posted by: Giordana Mecagni

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Neighborhood Matters’ Spring 2018 will focus on transportation in Boston. We will discuss how transportation has changed the fabric of the city by focusing on several key flashpoints: “I-695,” a highway rejected by community activists in the 1970s; the “Big Dig”, one of the nation’s largest infrastructure projects ever completed (1980s-1990s); and the “Silver Line,” (Phase 1 2000s) including current plans for expansion and improvement.

All events are free and open to the public, lunch will be served.

 

2/3: Equal or Better: The Story of The Silver Line

12 PM, Snell Library, Room 90 (Film runtime 53 minutes)

Featuring Special Guests Kris Carter and Scott Hamwey

In 1987 the Washington Street Elevated train was torn down and the Washington Street corridor to Dudley Square was left without rapid transit for the first time since 1901.

Equal or Better follows the story of a misstated promise to three Boston communities and the issues of equality still present in our country’s transportation priorities.

Scott Hamwey leads the Massachusetts Department of Transportation’s Transit Planning team and oversaw the planning phase of the Silver Line Gateway Project. The Silver Line Gateway Project encompasses four new bus stations and connects Chelsea and East Boston (via the Blue Line’s Airport Station) with the Red Line’s South Station and the Seaport District.

Kris Carter is the Co-Chair of the Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics. He is a non-practicing engineer, an optimistic urban planner, and a self-taught filmmaker. He has a not so secret love for Boston (his adopted home) and working through challenging human-centered urban problems. Kris has been nationally recognized by the APA for his blending of storytelling and urban planning and the Federal Labs Consortium for his innovation in transportation work.

3/15: People before Highways: Boston Activists, Urban Planners, and a New Movement for City Making

12PM Snell Library, Room 422 (Book talk)

A book talk featuring special guest Karilyn Crockett, who is the author of People Before Highways: Boston Activists, Urban Planners, and a New Movement for City Making. Dr. Crockett is director of Economic Policy & Research for the City of Boston. She holds a Ph.D. in American studies from Yale University.

Linking archival research, (including in Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections), ethnographic fieldwork, and oral history, Karilyn Crockett in People before Highways offers ground-level analysis of the social, political, and environmental significance of a local anti-highway protest and its lasting national implications. The story of how an unlikely multiracial coalition of urban and suburban residents, planners, and activists emerged to stop an interstate highway is one full of suspenseful twists and surprises, including for the actors themselves.

4/3: Great Projects: The Building of America ‘The Big Dig’” (WGBH, 2003)

12PM Snell Library, Room 90 (Film runtime 56 minutes)

Featuring Special Guest Fred Salvucci, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and former Massachusetts Secretary of Transportation.

In the post World War II years, urban highways divided neighborhoods; nothing stood in the way of their construction. In Boston, the Central Artery cut through downtown Boston and the city was left with an ugly green monster, an elevated highway in the heart of its historic and business districts. By the 1970s, city planners wanted to tear it down but the existing highway was so vital to the city’s transportation that closing it down for any length of time was unfeasible.

The solution to this dilemma became known as the Big Dig. A local engineer named Fred Salvucci, (whose own grandmother had been displaced by the Mass Pike years earlier), championed a complex plan that resulted in a transportation renaissance in Boston and a renewal of much of the city’s infrastructure.

 About Neighborhood Matters

Neighborhood Matters is a lunchtime series that celebrates the ways in which community groups have shaped the neighborhoods surrounding the Northeastern campus. This series is curated by Northeastern University Library Archives and Special Collections with the assistance of Library Communications and Events.

Neighborhood Matters is co-sponsored by Northeastern University City and Community Affairs and Northeastern University Office of Institutional Diversity and Inclusion.

Archives and Special Collections at Northeastern University Libraries

The Archives and Special Collections at Northeastern University Libraries houses and carefully curates a diverse collection of historical records relating to Boston’s fight for social justice; preserving the history of Boston’s social movements, including civil & political rights, immigrants rights, homelessness and urban and environmental justice. They focus on the history of Boston’s African American, Asian American, LGBTQ, Latino and other communities, as well as Boston’s public infrastructure, neighborhoods, and natural environments.

The primary source materials they collect and make available are used by the community members, students, faculty, scholars, journalists, and others from across the world as evidence on which histories are built. An understanding of the past can help inspire the next generation of leaders to fight for economic, political, and social rights.

Posted in: Archives and Special Collections, Library News and Events, Serendipity

13
Dec17

Collections on the Move!

Posted by: Amira Aaron

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The move of lesser-used library print collections to an offsite annex announced earlier this fall by Dan Cohen, Dean of Libraries, and Provost James Bean is about to start.  The project will begin on the 4th floor and you will see people hard at work selecting items from the shelves and packing boxes.  There will be increased activity in the stacks on the 3rd and 4th floors during this project and the back service elevator will be restricted to library and vendor staff.  Thank you for your understanding as we work to bring you additional study space along with new and improved services.

Here are a couple of important links to follow for more information:

Collection Move Status Updates

Letter from Dan Cohen and Provost Bean, September 2017

For assistance, contact the Help and information Desk on the first floor.

Posted in: Collections, Library News and Events

27
Nov17

Northeastern Archives’ Elma Lewis honored by Celebrity Series of Boston

Posted by: Molly Brown

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Elma Lewis, whose papers reside in the Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections and is the founder of the Elma Lewis School of Fine Arts, the National Center of Afro-American Artists, and the Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists will be celebrated along with choreographer Alvin Ailey by the Celebrity Series of Boston at John Hancock Hall on Wednesday, December 6 at 7:00 PM.

Celebrity Series of Boston’s event is entitled “REVELATIONS: The Legacies of Alvin Ailey and Boston’s Elma Lewis.” The event is free and open to the public.

If you are interested in attending please follow this link to register and find more information: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/revelations-the-legacies-of-alvin-ailey-and-bostons-elma-lewis-tickets-39629597192?aff=cswebsite

If you are interested in finding out more about Elma Lewis and her legacy in the arts and African American communities in Boston visit the Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections finding aid for her papers here: http://www.library.neu.edu/archives/collect/findaids/m38findprint.htm

Posted in: Archives and Special Collections, Library News and Events

30
Aug17

An Update on Our Wikipedia Visiting Scholar

Posted by: Caroline Klibanoff

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In March, we welcomed Rosie Stephenson-Goodknight as our first Wikipedia Visiting Scholar, working to improve the presence of Wikipedia articles on women and writing before 1900. Her work is supported by scholars in the Women Writers Project and Northeastern reference librarians.

Rosie will be with us, working remotely, through December of this year and has already made remarkable progress on bolstering the canon of women writers and their works on Wikipedia. She has created new pages for over 86 women and/or works by women, and has improved many others with additional information, context and citations.

Through Rosie’s work, you can now learn about Birdie Blye, a descendant of John Hancock who was a child prodigy at the piano and gave concert tours in Europe at just 11 years old, before writing articles about her travels and music criticism. You can get to know Lilian Bell, a novelist who made waves with her first fiction book, The Love Affairs of an Old Maid. Bell’s mother was such a careful editor, and tough critic, that Bell found no reason to dread her books being reviewed: “What have I to fear from the public?” she asked. “Mamma has read it.”

 

Birdie Blye

You can also learn about Mittie Frances Clarke Point, a turn-of-the-century novelist who wrote 80 dime store novels under the pseudonym Mrs. Alex McVeigh Miller; Emily Thornton Charles, a journalist who founded the Washington, D.C. newspaper National Veteran; and Mary Catherine Chase, a 19th-century Catholic nun who wrote essays and literature under pen names.

You can keep up with Rosie’s work on her Wikipedia page. We look forward to seeing more of Rosie’s work throughout her time with us this year.

 

Posted in: Information and Society, Library News and Events

22
Aug17

Fall Course Reserves: Submit Now!

Posted by: Erin Beach

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Reserve BooksFaculty and staff, this is the perfect time to submit your course reserve requests for Fall 2017!  Classes will be underway in less than two weeks, and the sooner we receive your materials, the sooner we’ll have them ready for students to borrow. To request library materials for reserve, submit this form (myNEU login required). The library doesn’t purchase textbooks for courses, but we’d be happy to add your personal copies to our catalog; just print out the completed request form and drop it off with your textbooks at the Help and Information Desk on the 1st floor. 

Feel free to get in touch with me directly with any questions or concerns.

Posted in: Library News and Events, Serendipity