Information and Society

18
Jan12

Why is Wikipedia down today? (Jan. 18, 2012)

Posted by: Hillary Corbett

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Major websites such as Wikipedia and the Internet Archive are holding blackouts today, January 18, 2012, in protest of two anti-piracy bills currently before Congress. Many believe that the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the Protect Intellectual Property Act (PIPA) go too far in their efforts to curb illegal downloading and streaming of movies and television shows.

The stated intent of these acts is to protect the intellectual property rights of copyright holders (sometimes the authors or creators but more frequently the large media corporations who own the works). However, if passed into law, they may set a dangerous precedent for permitting private companies to block access to information. Wikipedia, among other sites, has chosen to do just that today – block access to the information that millions of us seek every day – in order to highlight what they feel could happen if SOPA and PIPA are passed.

What do you think about this topic? Read more here:

Full text of SOPA and PIPA

“A Political Coming of Age for the Tech Industry” (The New York Times)

On a lighter note…

“Wikipedia Blackout: A Nation of Students Mourn” (The Guardian)
(compilation of tweets, may contain foul language)

Register your opinion on SOPA/PIPA with Congress:

PopVox: What’s Your Position on the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA)?

PopVox: What’s Your Position on the Protect IP Act (PIPA)?

Need that information TODAY? Visit our online collection of dictionaries and encyclopedias!

Posted in: Information and Society, Library News and Events, Research Online, Scholarly Communications, Tech Alerts

7
Dec11

Apply Creative Commons Licenses to Your Work with These Tools

Posted by: Hillary Corbett

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Next time you’re writing a paper, putting together a presentation, uploading a video to YouTube, or updating your website, why not tell your audience that you’ve decided to expand access to your work? With a Creative Commons license, you keep your copyright but allow people to copy and distribute your work provided they give you credit — and only on the conditions you specify.

If you have a PC and use Microsoft Office products like Word and PowerPoint, you can get a free add-in that makes it easy to include a Creative Commons license. Read more about it and download the add-in here:

To include CC licenses elsewhere (anywhere!), the Creative Commons license chooser offers the ability to select the criteria you want your license to include and then provides you with the relevant text and an image to use (including HTML for use on the web). In addition, Creative Commons offers best practices for marking your work as CC-licensed in a variety of formats, including images and video. Sites like YouTube and Flickr also offer the option of applying a Creative Commons license when you upload your stuff.

For even more info about Creative Commons, check out their website.

Posted in: Information and Society, Scholarly Communications

17
Nov11

2012 Media Showcase: Call for Submissions

Posted by: Jonathan Iannone

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The Digital Media Design Studio is once again calling for the submission of media projects highlighting this year’s theme, which is “Going Green” (Sustainability).

Here is the link to the flyer with contact information and submission requirements:

DMDS media showcase flyer (PDF)

We look forward to seeing everyone’s work.

Posted in: Art, Environmental Studies, Information and Society, Library News and Events, Serendipity

26
Oct11

Open Access Week event: Open Textbooks and Flat World Knowledge – Thursday at 10:30 a.m.

Posted by: Hillary Corbett

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Join us on Thursday, October 27, at 10:30 a.m. in 90 Snell Library for a presentation on open textbooks. Michael Boezi, editorial director of Flat World Knowledge, the leading commercial publisher of open textbooks, will speak on “Keeping Education Accessible: The Textbook Affordability Crisis and Emerging Open Solutions.
High textbook prices increasingly challenge the mission of many institutions to provide affordable, quality education. The emerging trend of open content is reshaping the publishing landscape, allowing for the rise of new business models that:

  1. significantly reduce the cost of high-quality learning materials, and thereby the overall cost of education;
  2. meet the growing demand for alternate, flexible formats that keep pace with the different ways we consume information; and
  3. provide authors with a forward-looking compensation model.

Boezi will discuss the emerging trend of open content, examining the advantages (and challenges) of “open” as it relates to textbooks, as well as the economic, social, and technology drivers that are transforming education and propelling the growth of free, low-cost, and open alternatives to expensive, traditional college textbooks.

Refreshments will be served.

For a full schedule of our Open Access Week events, visit our News & Events page.

Posted in: Information and Society, Scholarly Communications

25
Oct11

Open Access Week panel: “Wikipedia: Friend or Foe?” – Wednesday at 1:30

Posted by: Hillary Corbett

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Join us on Wednesday at 1:30 in Snell Library room 421 for a panel discussion that is sure to engage both students and their instructors. Three Northeastern faculty members – Jeff Howe (Journalism), Joseph Reagle (Communication), and Heidi Wilkes (CPS) – will discuss Wikipedia, crowdsourcing, and social networking tools as components of the research process. There will be plenty of time for audience discussion afterwards.

⇒ Read an interview with Jeff Howe in the News@Northeastern, September 8, 2011: “The power of the ‘Crowd’”

⇒ Watch the trailer for Jeff Howe’s book, Crowdsourcing: Why the Power of the Crowd is Driving the Future of Business.

⇒ Read an interview with Joseph Reagle in the News@Northeastern, August 16, 2011: “Cultural connections, a click away”

⇒ Watch a video of Reagle produced by the News: Joseph Reagle speaking on Wikipedia

Refreshments will be served.

For a full schedule of our Open Access Week events, visit our News & Events page.

 

 

Posted in: Information and Society, Research Online, Scholarly Communications