Information and Society

7
Dec11

Apply Creative Commons Licenses to Your Work with These Tools

Posted by: Hillary Corbett

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Next time you’re writing a paper, putting together a presentation, uploading a video to YouTube, or updating your website, why not tell your audience that you’ve decided to expand access to your work? With a Creative Commons license, you keep your copyright but allow people to copy and distribute your work provided they give you credit — and only on the conditions you specify.

If you have a PC and use Microsoft Office products like Word and PowerPoint, you can get a free add-in that makes it easy to include a Creative Commons license. Read more about it and download the add-in here:

To include CC licenses elsewhere (anywhere!), the Creative Commons license chooser offers the ability to select the criteria you want your license to include and then provides you with the relevant text and an image to use (including HTML for use on the web). In addition, Creative Commons offers best practices for marking your work as CC-licensed in a variety of formats, including images and video. Sites like YouTube and Flickr also offer the option of applying a Creative Commons license when you upload your stuff.

For even more info about Creative Commons, check out their website.

Posted in: Information and Society, Scholarly Communications

17
Nov11

2012 Media Showcase: Call for Submissions

Posted by: Jonathan Iannone

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The Digital Media Design Studio is once again calling for the submission of media projects highlighting this year’s theme, which is “Going Green” (Sustainability).

Here is the link to the flyer with contact information and submission requirements:

DMDS media showcase flyer (PDF)

We look forward to seeing everyone’s work.

Posted in: Art, Environmental Studies, Information and Society, Library News and Events, Serendipity

26
Oct11

Open Access Week event: Open Textbooks and Flat World Knowledge – Thursday at 10:30 a.m.

Posted by: Hillary Corbett

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Join us on Thursday, October 27, at 10:30 a.m. in 90 Snell Library for a presentation on open textbooks. Michael Boezi, editorial director of Flat World Knowledge, the leading commercial publisher of open textbooks, will speak on “Keeping Education Accessible: The Textbook Affordability Crisis and Emerging Open Solutions.
High textbook prices increasingly challenge the mission of many institutions to provide affordable, quality education. The emerging trend of open content is reshaping the publishing landscape, allowing for the rise of new business models that:

  1. significantly reduce the cost of high-quality learning materials, and thereby the overall cost of education;
  2. meet the growing demand for alternate, flexible formats that keep pace with the different ways we consume information; and
  3. provide authors with a forward-looking compensation model.

Boezi will discuss the emerging trend of open content, examining the advantages (and challenges) of “open” as it relates to textbooks, as well as the economic, social, and technology drivers that are transforming education and propelling the growth of free, low-cost, and open alternatives to expensive, traditional college textbooks.

Refreshments will be served.

For a full schedule of our Open Access Week events, visit our News & Events page.

Posted in: Information and Society, Scholarly Communications

25
Oct11

Open Access Week panel: “Wikipedia: Friend or Foe?” – Wednesday at 1:30

Posted by: Hillary Corbett

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Join us on Wednesday at 1:30 in Snell Library room 421 for a panel discussion that is sure to engage both students and their instructors. Three Northeastern faculty members – Jeff Howe (Journalism), Joseph Reagle (Communication), and Heidi Wilkes (CPS) – will discuss Wikipedia, crowdsourcing, and social networking tools as components of the research process. There will be plenty of time for audience discussion afterwards.

⇒ Read an interview with Jeff Howe in the News@Northeastern, September 8, 2011: “The power of the ‘Crowd’”

⇒ Watch the trailer for Jeff Howe’s book, Crowdsourcing: Why the Power of the Crowd is Driving the Future of Business.

⇒ Read an interview with Joseph Reagle in the News@Northeastern, August 16, 2011: “Cultural connections, a click away”

⇒ Watch a video of Reagle produced by the News: Joseph Reagle speaking on Wikipedia

Refreshments will be served.

For a full schedule of our Open Access Week events, visit our News & Events page.

 

 

Posted in: Information and Society, Research Online, Scholarly Communications

25
Oct11

Extra! Extra! Read all about Library Press Display!

Posted by: Kathie Demeritt

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Library Press Display is a great but little-known resource available through Snell Library. If you are looking for international or U.S. newspapers, Library Press Display is a convenient and easy to navigate tool that has a large collection of world newspapers from the past 60 days.

The Library Press Display home screen shows the last 7 days of important world news and events. This resource has tabs that allow you to search or browse newspapers by country, by language, or alphabetically. For most papers there are two ways to read each paper: you can click on the heading and an easy to read digital version of the article will appear, or you can choose to zoom in on the actual pages of the paper and read the articles as you would if you had the paper copy of the newspaper in your hands. 

For international users who prefer to navigate Library Press Display in their first language, the display can be switched to Arabic, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Russian, Spanish, and Traditional Chinese. The language can be switched on the labels, tabs, and buttons.

Don’t forget, Snell Library also has several other news and newspaper resources available! For general news try Access World News. For other newspapers, including historical newspapers, check out Snell Library’s newspaper resources page.

Posted in: Information and Society, Library News and Events, Read, Listen, Watch, Serendipity