6
Oct17

Now’s Your Chance to Meet the Press!

Posted by: Brooke Williams

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Eleanor Roosevelt is seated at a table on the Meet the Press set. She is smiling at a man standing behind her. Host Ned Brooks is seated next to them.

September 16, 1956: Eleanor Roosevelt is seated at a table on the Meet the Press set in New York City. She is smiling at a man standing behind her. Host Ned Brooks is seated next to them.

Meet the Press has been on television longer than any other program in history. The show premiered in 1947, and it’s been a cornerstone of the American cultural and political landscape ever since. It’s the first show to ever conduct a live interview via satellite (in 1965, with British Prime Minister Harold Wilson) and the first live network news show to ever host a sitting president (Gerald Ford, in 1975). Since Ford, every American president has dropped by Meet the Press at least once.

Now, all of this history, much of which has been unseen since its original television broadcast, is just a few clicks away. Over the summer, Snell Library acquired access to the full surviving run of Meet the Press, from 1947 to today, through Alexander Street Press. That’s almost 1500 hours—or 62.5 days—of video available to you for free, dating back to 1957. You can watch Eleanor Roosevelt talk politics in the 1950s; see Martin Luther King, Jr. discuss the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s; hear Dan Rostenkowski describe Reaganomics in the 1980s; or watch Ross Perot’s presidential campaign unfold in the 1990s. Many episodes include detailed transcripts and closed captioning.

Meet the Press is available from our A-Z Databases list. You can also click here for direct access. If you are off campus, you may be asked to sign in with your NEU ID and password.

Posted in: Communication Studies, Economics, History, Information and Society, Journalism and International Affairs, Online Collections, Political Science, Read, Listen, Watch, Serendipity, Sociology

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