11
Sep08

The Eyre Affair

Posted by: Emily Sabo

Gravatar

The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde reshaped many of my ideas about reading and books-it’s one of the most creative and fun stories that I have ever read. The Wall Street Journal writes: “Filled with clever wordplay, literary allusion and bibliowit, The Eyre Affair combines elements of Monty Python, Harry Potter, Stephen Hawking and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. But its quirky charm is all its own.” That cover blurb (along with the Jane Eyre title reference) sold me on it.

Thursday Next is Fforde’s heroine, and she’s a literary detective in a very unfamiliar version of 1985 England. When arch-villain Acheron Hades kidnaps Jane Eyre from her own novel, Thursday Next is hot on his heels.

I’ve really liked Fforde’s subsequent books, but The Eyre Affair is his first, and in my mind, best outing. I think if you’re a bibliophile or a verbivore, it’s hard not to love!

Posted in: Read, Listen, Watch, Staff Interests

5
Sep08

Pinball Wizardry

Posted by: Diann Smothers

Gravatar

Once again, the Research & Instruction department held its annual Pinball Tournament. R&I Librarians competed for a deluxe championship prize in this annual event. Previous champion (yours truly) got the contestants on track, made sure flippers worked and that the contestants knew how to find the controls. For 30 minutes, the sounds of pinball filled the room.

Winner was Sandy Dunphy, with a top score of 3,915,000 points.

I’d post a few photos, but nothing will load them up.

Congratulations to Sandy, our new Pinball champion!

Posted in: Staff Interests

3
Sep08

More on Library Liberty

Posted by: Emily Sabo

Gravatar

I just read this NY Times article, on Sarah Palin’s career as mayor of Wasilla, AK.  One incident really jumped out at me–her experience with the town library, librarians, and possibly censoring books (or at least having that discussion).  It surprised me a bit that this would be occuring at the level of a town mayor–has anyone heard any other stories like this?  Any thoughts?

Posted in: Information and Society

29
Aug08

The Alibi

Posted by: Emily Sabo

Gravatar

I read The Alibi by Sandra Brown.  This is the first book by her that I’ve read, though she’s a pretty popular mystery author.  I actually read an excerpt of it in a magazine many years ago, and it stuck in my head-so when I saw it on the recreational reading shelf, I knew I had to check it out!

It’s set in a very sultry Charleston, South Carolina and opens with the murder of wealthy, sleazy real estate magnate, Lute Pettijohn.  Hammond Cross is the young attorney of sterling character and pedigree, who hopes to use the case to cement his ascent to lead prosecutor.  (We learn that in South Carolina, “County Solicitor” is the correct term, in place of “District Attorney”).  Brown weaves together a tangled web of over-the-top Southern characters.  There are intersecting love triangles involving Hammond Cross, his cut-throat professional rival, Pettijohn’s drunken socialite widow, and the obsessive investigating detective.  But the story’s real tension revolves around “the alibi”-Hammond’s rendezvous with a mysterious stranger, who becomes the prime suspect in the Pettijohn case.  And neither she nor he, are about to reveal their relationship.  It’s a legal ethics minefield and probably pretty far-fetched, but I still found The Alibi to be absorbing and exciting.

Pick it up to enjoy over the last weekend of summer!

Posted in: Read, Listen, Watch

19
Aug08

Tristram Shandy

Posted by: Emily Sabo

Gravatar

I finished Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy, another one of my TBR 2008 Challenge books.  This is often hailed as the first post-modern text, and a few years ago, I saw a film adaptation A Cock and Bull Story, which I found to be a lot of fun.  So I was quite looking forward to this.  It’s a (very) rambling story where the narrator recounts his birth-paying particular attention to circumstances surrounding his conception, his father, and his uncle Toby.  Sterne has no compunction about breaking off a chapter, just as it’s about to reach a resolution.  It’s a narrative of interruptions, and so it requires a good deal of focus to follow the novel’s train(s) of thought. 

Have any of you read it? What did you think? 

Posted in: Read, Listen, Watch